hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
England (United Kingdom) 1,858 0 Browse Search
China (China) 630 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 620 0 Browse Search
Goa (Goa, India) 614 0 Browse Search
Guiana (Guyana) 580 0 Browse Search
Russia (Russia) 568 0 Browse Search
Peru (Peru) 506 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico) 490 0 Browse Search
Ormus (Iran) 482 0 Browse Search
Pegu (Myanmar) 460 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

Found 777 total hits in 83 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Jamaica (Cuba) (search for this): narrative 716
of August to unlade foure ships which come out of Spaine laden with rich merchandise, and receive in heere againe their lading of a kinde of merchandise called Annile and Cochinilla (although it be not of such value as that of Nova Hispania), and silver of the mines of Tomaangua, and golde of Nicaragua, and hides, and Salsa perilla, the best in all the Indies: all which merchandize they returne, and depart from thence alwayes in the moneth of April following, taking their course by the Island of Jamaica, in which Island there dwell on the West side of it certeine Spanyards of no great number. From this place they go to the cape of S. Anthony, which is the uttermost part of the Westward of the Island of Cuba, and from thence to Havana lying hard by, which is the chiefest port that the king of Spaine hath in all the countreys of the Indies, and of greatest importance: for all the ships, both from Peru , Hunduras, Porto rico, S. Domingo, Jamaica , and all other places in his Indies, ar
Campeche (Campeche, Mexico) (search for this): narrative 716
ry mighty and big men. Afterwards I returned another way to the province of Sonsonate by Vera cruz, and so to Rio Alvarado, and from thence to the province of Campeche , which lieth on the South side of the bay of Mexico: the chiefe towne of this province is called Merida , in which is a bishop and almost 100 Spanyards. The Indi number there were 200. men landed here, & 4. great brasse pieces of ordinance, although the castle were before sufficiently provided: 200. men more were sent to Campeche , & certaine ordinance: 200. to Florida with ordinance: and 100. lastly to S. John Ullua. As for ordinance there they have sufficient, and of the very same which shore woollen and linnen cloth, to the value thereof. From hence by foule weather wee were forced to seeke the Port of Saint John de Ullua. In our way thwart of Campeche we met with a Spaniard, a small ship, who was bound for Santo Domingo: he had in him a Spaniard called Augustin de villa nueva, who was the man that betrayed all
Culiacan (Sinaloa, Mexico) (search for this): narrative 716
here come in the meane time any man or beast and wake or disquiet him, he speedeth well if he get from him. He is like unto a serpent, saving that he doth not flie, neither hath he wings. There is West out of Mexico a port towne which is on the South sea, called Puerto de Acapulco, where as there are shippes which they have ordinarily for the navigation of China , which they have newly found. This port is threescore leagues from Mexico . There is another port towne which is called Culiacan , on the South sea, which lieth West and by North out of Mexico , and is 200 leagues from the same: and there the Spanyards made two ships to goe seeke the streight or gulfe, which, as they say, is betweene the Newfoundland and Groenland ; and they call it the Englishmens streigth: which as yet was never fully found. They say, that streight lieth not farre from the maine land of China , which the Spanyards account to be marvellous rich. Toward the North from Mexico there are great stor
Pachuca (Hidalgo, Mexico) (search for this): narrative 716
in English, as March, march on you English dogges, Lutherans, enemies to God. And the next day we came to a towne called Pachuca , and there are two places of that name: as this towne of Pachuca , and the mines of Pachuca , which are mines of silver,Pachuca , and the mines of Pachuca , which are mines of silver, and are about sixe leagues distant from this towne of Pachuca towards the Northwest. Here at this towne the good olde man our Governour suffered us to stay two dayes and two nights, having compassion of our sicke and weake men, full sore againstPachuca , which are mines of silver, and are about sixe leagues distant from this towne of Pachuca towards the Northwest. Here at this towne the good olde man our Governour suffered us to stay two dayes and two nights, having compassion of our sicke and weake men, full sore against the minde of the yoong man his companion. From thence we tooke our journey, and travelled foure or five dayes by little villages, and Stantias, which are farmes or dairie houses of the Spaniards, and ever as wee had neede, the good olde man would stPachuca towards the Northwest. Here at this towne the good olde man our Governour suffered us to stay two dayes and two nights, having compassion of our sicke and weake men, full sore against the minde of the yoong man his companion. From thence we tooke our journey, and travelled foure or five dayes by little villages, and Stantias, which are farmes or dairie houses of the Spaniards, and ever as wee had neede, the good olde man would still provide us sufficient of meates, fruites, and water to sustaine us. At the end of which five dayes wee came to a towne within five leagues of Mexico , which is called Quoghliclan, where wee also stayed one whole day and two nights, where was a fa
Canaries (Saint Lucia) (search for this): narrative 716
on the ships of the said fleet, & being not assured when they would depart, determined to ship themselves for the Isles of the Canaries, which are 250. leagues from S. Lucar, and there to stay till the said fleet should come thither: for that is con had seene the countrey, the people, and the disposition thereof, wee departed from thence, and passed to the next Ile of the Canaries 18. leagues off, called Teneriffe , and being come on land, went up to the citie called La Laguna, where we remainy towardes the Iland of S. Domingo, otherwise called Hispaniola. So that within 32. dayes after we departed from the Iles of Canaries wee arrived with our ship at the port of S. Domingo, and went in over the barre where our ship knocked her keele at being desirous to see the world, I embarked my selfe in the bay of Cadiz in Andaluzia, in a shippe bound for the Isles of the Canaries, where she tooke in her lading, & set forth from thence for the voyage, in the moneth of June, the same yere. Wit
Santo Domingo (Argentina) (search for this): narrative 716
cattel, which dayly do increase, and they are of a greater growth then ours are. You may have a great steere that hath an hundred weight of tallow in his belly for sixteene shillings; and some one man hath 20000 head of cattel of his owne. They sell the hides unto the merchants, who lade into Spaine as many as may be well spared. They spend many in the countrey in shooes and boots, and in the mines: and as the countrey is great, so is the increase of the cattell woonderfull. In the Island of Santo Domingo they commonly kill the beasts for their hides and tallow; and the fowles eat the carkeises: and so they do in Cuba and Porto Rico, whereas there is much sugar, and cana fistula, which dayly they send into Spaine. They have great increase of sheepe in like maner, and dayly do intend to increase them. They have much wooll, and as good as the wooll of Spaine. They make cloth as much as serveth the countrey, for the common people, and send much cloth into Peru . I have seene cloth made
Canow (Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany) (search for this): narrative 716
and the women weare about them a garment much like unto a flannell petticote. The kings pallace was the first place wee were brought unto in Mexico , where without we were willed to sit downe. Much people, men, women, and children came wondring about us, many lamented our misery, & some of their clergy asked us if we were Christians, we said, we praised God, we were as good Christians as they: they asked how they might know that, we said, by our confessions. From thence we were carried in a Canow to a Tanners house, which standeth a little from the citie: the next morning two friers and two priests came thither to us, and willed us to blesse our selves, and say our prayers in the Latin tongue, that they might understand us, many of our company did so, whereupon they returned to the viceroy, and told him that we were good Christians, and that they liked us well, and then they brought us much reliefe, with clothes, our sicke men were sent to their Hospitals, where many were cured, and
Bourne (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 716
Espanna, the 8. of October 1568.NOT untruely nor without cause said Job the faithfull servant of God (whom the sacred Scriptures tell us, to have dwelt in the land of Hus) that man being borne of a woman, living a short time, is replenished with many miseries: which some know by reading of histories, many by the view of others calamities, and I by experience in my selfe, as this present Treatise insuing shall shew. It is not unknowen unto many, that I Job Hortop pouder-maker was borne at Bourne , a towne in Lincolnshire , from my age of twelve yeeres brought up in Redriffe neere London , with M. Francis Lee, who was the Queenes Majesties powder-maker, whom I served, until I was prest to go on the 3. voyage to the West Indies, with the right worshipful Sir John Hawkins, who appointed me to be one of the Gunners in her Majesties ship called the Jesus of Lubeck, who set saile from Plimmouth in the moneth of October 567. having with him another ship of her Majesties, called the Minion,
f January, wee obteined by that time the number of 150. Negros. And being ready to depart from the Sea coast, there was a Negro sent as an Ambassadour to our Generall, from a King of the Negros, which was oppressed with other Kings his bordering ne awry. David Alexander & Robert Cooke returned to serve the Inquisitor, who shortly after maried them both to two of his Negro women: Richard Williams maried a rich widow of Biskay with 4000 Pezos: Paul Horsewell is maried to a Mestisa, as they nam Cortes the Conquerour, who had with her in marriage foure thousand Pezos, and a faire house: John Storie is maried to a Negro woman: William Lowe had leave and licence to goe into Spaine where he is now married: for mine owne part I could never thmpany were hurt with poysoned arrowes: about nine dayes after, the 8. that were wounded died. Our general was taught by a Negro , to draw the poyson out of his wound with a clove of garlike, whereby he was cured. From thence wee went to Sierra leona,
China (Alabama, United States) (search for this): narrative 716
t the Spaniards durst not go on land among them. And because they had bene long upon the voyage, their people were very weake, and so went not on land, to know what commoditie was upon it. And for want of victuals, they arrived in Nova Hispania, in a port called Puerto de Navidad, and thence returned backe againe unto Peru , whereas they were evil entreated, because they had not knowen more of the same Island. They have in this port of Navidad ordinarily their ships, which goe to the Islands of China, which are certaine Islands which they have found within these 7. yeres. They have brought from thence gold, and much Cinamom, and dishes of earth, and cups of the same, so fine, that every man that may have a piece of them, will give the weight of silver for it. There was a Mariner that brought a pearle as big as a doves egge from thence, & a stone, for which the Viceroy would have given 3000. duckets. Many things they bring from thence, most excellent. There are many of these ylan
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9