hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
England (United Kingdom) 1,858 0 Browse Search
China (China) 630 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 620 0 Browse Search
Goa (Goa, India) 614 0 Browse Search
Guiana (Guyana) 580 0 Browse Search
Russia (Russia) 568 0 Browse Search
Peru (Peru) 506 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico) 490 0 Browse Search
Ormus (Iran) 482 0 Browse Search
Pegu (Myanmar) 460 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

Found 51 total hits in 12 results.

1 2
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 740
so to recover his losse of the Spaniards themselves, at his owne charge with the help of his friends hee furnished two barkes for the West Indies, the greater of which barkes was called the Ragged staffe, himselfe being captaine, & Philip Roche Master thereof, the other named the Beare had one William Coxe of Limehouse for her Master and captaine. And thus all our company being imbarked at Plimmoth on Whitsonday in the beginning of June, we set forward, & in our course we met with a ship of London , & afterwards with another ship, but tooke nothing from either of them. Our first arrival was at one of the Island of Cape Verde, named Del sal, vz. the Isle of salt, where we tooke certain fishes called Tortoises: and there we remained one night and halfe the day following. And from thence wee came to the Isle of Maio, being distant from Isla del sal, 14 or 15 leagues, where we tooke in fresh water and traffiqued with certaine Portugals inhabiting in that place, of whom we had some victua
Honduras (Honduras) (search for this): narrative 740
ad surprised. From hence (by the direction of certain Indians) we sayled into the gulfe of the Honduras : there we tooke a barke wherin were rials of plate, to the value of 100 pound, Maiz or Indian , we arrived at an Island called S. Francisco, being in the mouth of the great bay, called the Honduras . And within two dayes next after our arrivall there, William Coxe and divers others (which forancisco) with certaine others of our men in a skyffe, to the towne of Truxillio, in the bay of Honduras , which towne they surprised, and had therein wine and oyle as much as they would, and divers oimselfe : so for haste they left those that were in the skiffe (being 8 persons) in the bay of Honduras : what became of them afterward God knoweth. Hereupon we determined to saile for England , and sle of Silly neere Cornwall where we left our Frigat which we built new upon the shore of the Honduras , having in her at our landing ten botisios of oyle, and the foure cast Peeces that were in Joh
Tulu (Nevada, United States) (search for this): narrative 740
ne slaine. And from thence we departed for the maine land Southwards, to a certain bay, and there we abode 3 daies, but nothing of any reckoning was there atchieved. From thence we arrived at Cape de la Vela, where grewe a contention betweene our Captaine M. Andrew Barker, and his Master Philip Roche, upon comparisons made betweene them concerning the knowledge of Navigation, and about other quarels, which quarels afterward were an occasion of further mischiefe. Hence we sailed to the bay of Tulu (which is about 18 leagues Southwestward from Carthagena) where wee tooke a Frigat and certaine treasure therein to the value of 500 pound, namely barres of gold, and lingots of silver, and some quantity of corriento or coyne in rials of plate, and certaine greene stones called Emerauds, whereof one very great, being set in gold, was found tied secretly about the thigh of a frier. Here having stayed three dayes, and now being pursued by Spanish men of warre, wee departed with the sayd treasu
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 740
f Dominic Chester merchant of Bristol ) to learn the language. Now the sayd Andrew Barker forthwith upon his arrivall in England , in November, 1574, fraighted a small ship (named the Speedwell of Bristol) to goe for the Canaries with cloth and othergolde wee found therein. In this Frigat were 23 Spaniards whom wee set on shore, and two Flemings, them wee brought into England with us: wee had therein also foure cast pieces of Ordinance, 3 harquebuzes on crocke, 16 Spanish calivers, and a booke of Navigation: and in this Frigat some of our company came homeward into England . Thus passing forward in our course, we came to Veragua, where captaine Barker, & Philip Roche his Master, fought upon the foresayd quarel, in which combat the captainbeing 8 persons) in the bay of Honduras : what became of them afterward God knoweth. Hereupon we determined to saile for England , and being in the maine sea homeward bound, about 60 leagues from the Isle of S. Francisco, the Frigat wherein was the t
Cornwall (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 740
isco, the Frigat wherein was the treasure for the adventurers, and that which pertained to the captaine to the value of 2000 pound, being overset with sayle, with a flaw of wind was overthrowen, and all the goods therein perished: therein also were 14 persons drowned, and nine saved, whereof William Coxe and William Gillam were two. After this Philip Roche, Master of the Admirall called the Ragged staffe, died. And thus at length, (by the helpe of God) we arrived in the Isle of Silly neere Cornwall where we left our Frigat which we built new upon the shore of the Honduras , having in her at our landing ten botisios of oyle, and the foure cast Peeces that were in John Oxnams Frigat (which the yeere before was taken in the streit of Dariene) three harquebuzes on crocke, certaine calivers, and certaine treasure: Where William Cox and Andrew Browne devided the treasure amongst their company, delivering to some five pound, to some sixe pound, to some seven pound, to some more, as every ma
Bristol (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 740
he Beare, to the coast of Terra firma, and the Bay of Honduras in the West Indies, in the yeere 1576. Wherein the reasons are premised which mooved him to set forth this voyage against the Spaniards: collected out of certaine notes and examinations touching this enterprise by M. Richard Hakluyt. FIRST of all Andrew Barker having abode in one of the Canary Islands called Tenerif for a certaine time, and returning home left behind him Charles Chester (the sonne of Dominic Chester merchant of Bristol ) to learn the language. Now the sayd Andrew Barker forthwith upon his arrivall in England , in November, 1574, fraighted a small ship (named the Speedwell of Bristol) to goe for the Canaries with cloth and other merchandise of a great value. He sent also one John Drue of Bastable as his Factor to make sale and dispose of the said goods, who when he arrived at Tenerif, landed the marchandize, and sent home the barke with some small quantity of wine, making account to sell the sayd wares to g
Trinidad (Bolivia) (search for this): narrative 740
being distant from Isla del sal, 14 or 15 leagues, where we tooke in fresh water and traffiqued with certaine Portugals inhabiting in that place, of whom we had some victuals for knives and beades : and there we remained one day and one night: but our trumpetter was trecherously slaine by those Portugals, in revenge of which murther we set on fire two of their small villages. From this Island wee shaped our course over the maine Ocean toward the West Indies, and arrived happily at the Island of Trinidad, and had conference with certaine Indians inhabitants thereof, who gave us very friendly and courteous entertainement: and here we set up a pinnesse which we caried forth in the Ragged staffe, and traffiqued with the foresayd Indians for victuals. And after we had spent sixe dayes in this place we departed, and arrived next at the Isle of Margarita, where we tooke a small Spanish ship having in her certaine pitch and 30 tuns of Canarie wines whereof we reserved 4 or 5 tunnes to our sel
Isla (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 740
. And thus all our company being imbarked at Plimmoth on Whitsonday in the beginning of June, we set forward, & in our course we met with a ship of London , & afterwards with another ship, but tooke nothing from either of them. Our first arrival was at one of the Island of Cape Verde, named Del sal, vz. the Isle of salt, where we tooke certain fishes called Tortoises: and there we remained one night and halfe the day following. And from thence wee came to the Isle of Maio, being distant from Isla del sal, 14 or 15 leagues, where we tooke in fresh water and traffiqued with certaine Portugals inhabiting in that place, of whom we had some victuals for knives and beades : and there we remained one day and one night: but our trumpetter was trecherously slaine by those Portugals, in revenge of which murther we set on fire two of their small villages. From this Island wee shaped our course over the maine Ocean toward the West Indies, and arrived happily at the Island of Trinidad, and had co
Cape Verde (Cape Verde) (search for this): narrative 740
kes for the West Indies, the greater of which barkes was called the Ragged staffe, himselfe being captaine, & Philip Roche Master thereof, the other named the Beare had one William Coxe of Limehouse for her Master and captaine. And thus all our company being imbarked at Plimmoth on Whitsonday in the beginning of June, we set forward, & in our course we met with a ship of London , & afterwards with another ship, but tooke nothing from either of them. Our first arrival was at one of the Island of Cape Verde, named Del sal, vz. the Isle of salt, where we tooke certain fishes called Tortoises: and there we remained one night and halfe the day following. And from thence wee came to the Isle of Maio, being distant from Isla del sal, 14 or 15 leagues, where we tooke in fresh water and traffiqued with certaine Portugals inhabiting in that place, of whom we had some victuals for knives and beades : and there we remained one day and one night: but our trumpetter was trecherously slaine by those
The voyage of Master Andrew Barker of Bristol, with two ships, the one called the Ragged staffe, the other the Beare, to the coast of Terra firma, and the Bay of Honduras in the West Indies, in the yeere 1576. Wherein the reasons are premised which mooved him to set forth this voyage against the Spaniards: collected out of certaine notes and examinations touching this enterprise by M. Richard Hakluyt. FIRST of all Andrew Barker having abode in one of the Canary Islands called Tenerif for a certaine time, and returning home left behind him Charles Chester (the sonne of Dominic Chester merchant of Bristol ) to learn the language. Now the sayd Andrew Barker forthwith upon his arrivall in England , in November, 1574, fraighted a small ship (named the Speedwell of Bristol) to goe for the Canaries with cloth and other merchandise of a great value. He sent also one John Drue of Bastable as his Factor to make sale and dispose of the said goods, who when he arrived at Tenerif, landed the march
1 2