hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
England (United Kingdom) 1,858 0 Browse Search
China (China) 630 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 620 0 Browse Search
Goa (Goa, India) 614 0 Browse Search
Guiana (Guyana) 580 0 Browse Search
Russia (Russia) 568 0 Browse Search
Peru (Peru) 506 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico) 490 0 Browse Search
Ormus (Iran) 482 0 Browse Search
Pegu (Myanmar) 460 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

Found 70 total hits in 17 results.

1 2
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): narrative 768
rd. And so we parted, not hearing either of other untill we came into England . Our place of meeting should have beene at the Tortugas neere unto the point of Florida , but the Golden dragon and the Prudence were put to leeward of this place: neverthelesse wee fell with certeine islands within the point of Florida , where the cFlorida , where the captaine of the Dragon M. Christopher Newport sent his pinnesse on shore with certeine shot to seeke for fresh water, where wee found none; but found the Savages very courteous unto us, who came brest high into the sea, and brought us a line to hall in our boat on shore, and shewed us that up into the land Northward was fresh waterup the full number of twenty, the Spanyards themselves set one on fire in the bay of the Honduras , lest we should be masters of it. We shaped our course from Florida homeward by the isle of Flores one of the Azores , where we watered, finding sir John Burgh there, who tooke us to be Spanyards, and made up unto us; with whom
an olde knife: the other piece he gave to one William Wright a sailer, for an olde knife: which pieces of silver were in forme like unto the bosse of a bridle. These Savages were farre more civill than those of Dominica : for besides their courtesie, they covered their privities with a platted mat of greene straw, about three handfuls deepe, which came round about their waste, with the bush hanging downe behinde. The next day in the morning very early, there came a frigat of the iland of Cuba of 30 tunnes, put in by weather, which was bound for Havana , wherein were fifty hogges; to which we gave chase all that day, passing the gulfe of Bahama, and about five of the clocke in the afternoone, after a shot or two made at her, shee yeelded unto us: wee hoisted out our boat, and went aboord, where we found some five Spanyards, five and fifty hogs, and about some two hundred weight of excellent tabacco rolled up in seynes. We lightened them of their hogges and tabacco, and sent th
Canaries (Saint Lucia) (search for this): narrative 768
urnt upon the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile of shippes and frigats. THE 12. daye of Februarie An. 1591. we set saile from Dover roade, and having a prosperous winde, the 27. day of the same moneth wee fell with Cape Cantin on the coast of Barbarie, and on the 28. wee arrived at Santa Cruz roade, where having refreshed our selves some 3. or 4. dayes, we put off to sea againe, and about the 5. of March wee passed by the Ilands of the Canaries: and having a favourable wind, the 4. of April An. 1592. we fell with Dominica in the West Indies: where making stay a day or two, wee bartred with the Salvages for certaine commodities of theirs, viz. Tabacco, hennes, Potato rootes, &c. Passing from thence to a watering place on the other side of the cliffe, wee tooke a Portugall ship of Lisbone of 300. tuns, which came from Guinie, and was bound for Cartagena , wherein were 300. Negros young and olde. Which ship we tooke along
Cartagena (Spain) (search for this): narrative 768
off to sea againe, and about the 5. of March wee passed by the Ilands of the Canaries: and having a favourable wind, the 4. of April An. 1592. we fell with Dominica in the West Indies: where making stay a day or two, wee bartred with the Salvages for certaine commodities of theirs, viz. Tabacco, hennes, Potato rootes, &c. Passing from thence to a watering place on the other side of the cliffe, wee tooke a Portugall ship of Lisbone of 300. tuns, which came from Guinie, and was bound for Cartagena , wherein were 300. Negros young and olde. Which ship we tooke along with us to S. Juan de Puerto rico, where we landed the marchant and one Spaniard more within a league of the towne, and landing some 20. or 30. musketiers, some 20. horsemen made towards us; but wee retired to our boates without any service done. The 9. we lay hovering all day before the towne, the castle making a shot or two at us. The reason why wee set the Portugall marchant aland there was, for that he hoped to h
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 768
A true report of a voyage undertaken for the West Indies by M. Christopher Newport Generall of a fleete of three shippes and a pinnesse, viz. The golden Dragon Admirall, whereof was Captaine M. Newport himselfe; The Prudence Vice-admirall, under the conduct of Captaine Hugh Merrick; The Margaret under Captaine Robert Fred; and The Virgin our pinnesse under Captaine Henry Kidgil: Begun from London the 25. of Januarie 1591. Written by M. John Twitt of Harewich, Corporall in the Dragon. In which voyage they tooke and burnt upon the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile of shippes and frigats. THE 12. daye of Februarie An. 1591. we set saile from Dover roade, and having a prosperous winde, the 27. day of the same moneth wee fell with Cape Cantin on the coast of Barbarie, and on the 28. wee arrived at Santa Cruz roade, where having refreshed our selves some 3. or 4. dayes, we put off to sea againe, and about the 5. of March wee pa
Azores (Portugal) (search for this): narrative 768
up in seynes. We lightened them of their hogges and tabacco, and sent the men away with their frigat. In this voyage we tooke and sacked foure townes, seventeene frigats, and two ships, whereof eight were taken in the bay of the Honduras ; of all which we brought but two into England : the rest we sunke, burnt, and one of them we sent away with their men. And to make up the full number of twenty, the Spanyards themselves set one on fire in the bay of the Honduras , lest we should be masters of it. We shaped our course from Florida homeward by the isle of Flores one of the Azores , where we watered, finding sir John Burgh there, who tooke us to be Spanyards, and made up unto us; with whom wee joyned in the taking the mighty Portugall caracke called Madre de Dios, and our captaine M. Christopher Newport with divers of us was placed in her as captaine by the Generall sir John Burgh to conduct her into England , where we arrived in Dartmouth the seventh of September 1592.
Havana (Cuba) (search for this): narrative 768
t a sailer, for an olde knife: which pieces of silver were in forme like unto the bosse of a bridle. These Savages were farre more civill than those of Dominica : for besides their courtesie, they covered their privities with a platted mat of greene straw, about three handfuls deepe, which came round about their waste, with the bush hanging downe behinde. The next day in the morning very early, there came a frigat of the iland of Cuba of 30 tunnes, put in by weather, which was bound for Havana , wherein were fifty hogges; to which we gave chase all that day, passing the gulfe of Bahama, and about five of the clocke in the afternoone, after a shot or two made at her, shee yeelded unto us: wee hoisted out our boat, and went aboord, where we found some five Spanyards, five and fifty hogs, and about some two hundred weight of excellent tabacco rolled up in seynes. We lightened them of their hogges and tabacco, and sent the men away with their frigat. In this voyage we tooke and
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 768
men. Two of our shippes went to seeke our prize and our men: and other two of us came homeward. And so we parted, not hearing either of other untill we came into England . Our place of meeting should have beene at the Tortugas neere unto the point of Florida , but the Golden dragon and the Prudence were put to leeward of this pe we tooke and sacked foure townes, seventeene frigats, and two ships, whereof eight were taken in the bay of the Honduras ; of all which we brought but two into England : the rest we sunke, burnt, and one of them we sent away with their men. And to make up the full number of twenty, the Spanyards themselves set one on fire in the Spanyards, and made up unto us; with whom wee joyned in the taking the mighty Portugall caracke called Madre de Dios, and our captaine M. Christopher Newport with divers of us was placed in her as captaine by the Generall sir John Burgh to conduct her into England , where we arrived in Dartmouth the seventh of September 1592.
Dartmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 768
d up in seynes. We lightened them of their hogges and tabacco, and sent the men away with their frigat. In this voyage we tooke and sacked foure townes, seventeene frigats, and two ships, whereof eight were taken in the bay of the Honduras ; of all which we brought but two into England : the rest we sunke, burnt, and one of them we sent away with their men. And to make up the full number of twenty, the Spanyards themselves set one on fire in the bay of the Honduras , lest we should be masters of it. We shaped our course from Florida homeward by the isle of Flores one of the Azores , where we watered, finding sir John Burgh there, who tooke us to be Spanyards, and made up unto us; with whom wee joyned in the taking the mighty Portugall caracke called Madre de Dios, and our captaine M. Christopher Newport with divers of us was placed in her as captaine by the Generall sir John Burgh to conduct her into England , where we arrived in Dartmouth the seventh of September 1592.
ong Iland and very fruitfull, replenished with store of wilde beastes and swine, where we landed, hunted, and trained our men. Passing from hence Westward along the South coast of Hispaniola, wee descryed a frigat, which wee chased and tooke: wherein were 22. jarres of copper-money, being bound for S. Juan de Puerto rico, to buy wine there. The next day we tooke 2. small frigats more, but nothing of any value in them. The 15. of Aprill at night wee sacked a towne in the sayde Iland of Hispaniola called Ocoa, where was an Ingenio, wherein we found sugar & poultrie great store, but the people had discovered our ships over night, and were fled into the mountaines. This town standeth a league from the seaside, consisting of some fortie or fiftie houses. They brought us much cattell, and two wayne loades of sugar, to ransome the towne. While this action was perfourmed, Robert Freed of Harwich, captaine of the Margaret, tooke two frigats with certaine Spaniards on the other side
1 2