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Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): narrative 770
ld go with him to an harbour called Gonnavy, which is to the Northward of Cape Tiburon, that then he would helpe us with fresh victuals enough. Whereupon I returned aboord our ship, and certified our captaine of all: who made it knowen unto the company; which no sooner heard of it, but they would all go in. So here we staied with the aforesaid Frenchman 15 dayes: but small refreshing we could get, because the Spaniards stood in some feare of the Frenchman of war, supposing our ship to be a Portugal , and that we were his prize: neverthelesse hee certified them to the contrary. And in staying so long with him, and having little refreshing, our company began to be in a mutiny, and made report that the captaine & I went aboord the Frenchman but to make good cheere, and had not any care of them: but I protest before God, that our care was to get victuals wherby we might have bene gone from him. But in the meane time a great part of our company had conspired to take away the Frenchmans pin
Malaga (Spain) (search for this): narrative 770
d for want of refreshing. In this moneth of June we came to an anker at the isles of Pulo pinaom, whereas we stayed untill the first day of September, our men being very sicke, and dying apace. This day we set saile, and directed our course for Malaca : and wee had not bene farre at sea, but wee tooke a shippe of the kingdome of Pegu of some fourescore tunnes with wooden ankers, and about fiftie men in her, with a pinnesse of some eighteene tunnes at her stearne, both laden with pepper. But tun, laden chiefly with victuals, chests of hats, pintados, and Calicut clothes. Besides this we tooke another Portugall ship of some hundred tun, laden with victuals, rice, Calicos, pintados, and other commodities. These ships were bound for Malaca with victuals: for those of Goa, of S. Thomas, and of other places in the Indies doe victuall it, because that victuals there are very scarce. In the moneth of November 1592 we shaped our course for the island of Nicubar lying certeine league
Laguna (Para, Brazil) (search for this): narrative 770
us past, weyed and set saile to go for England : and they did share among them all the captaines victuals & mine, when they saw the Frenchman keepe us as prisoners. So the next morning we went to seeke out the Frenchmans pinnesse: which being at Laguna we shot off a piece, & so she came to us, having in her three more of our company, Edmund Barker our lieutenant, and one John West, and Richard Lucland one of the mutinous crew. The which I told the Frenchman of; & he could not deny, but that thmpany. And this day we tooke our leaves the one of the other; the Edward for England : and we bare in for Gonnavy, where afterwards we found the Frenchmans boat. The last of November 1593 Monsieur de la Barbotiere departed from a port called Laguna in Hispaniola. The 17 of December next insuing it was his fortune to have his ship cast away upon the Northwest part of the isle of Bermuda about midnight; the pilots making themselves at noone to be to the Southward of the island twelve league
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 770
nza where we stayed about a moneth with the Merchant royall, which by reason of sicknesse in our fleet was sent home for England with divers weake men. Here we bought an oxe for a knife of three pence, a sheepe for a broken knife or any other odde tt of our bread before we were aware: so that when we came to sharing, we had but 31 pound of bread a man to cary us into England , with a small quantity of rice a day. The last of March 1593 we doubled the cape of Bona Speranza. In April next n us very sore that we should pay his voyage. In the meane time the Edward seeing us past, weyed and set saile to go for England : and they did share among them all the captaines victuals & mine, when they saw the Frenchman keepe us as prisoners. So voyage, as also of the unrulinesse of the company. And this day we tooke our leaves the one of the other; the Edward for England : and we bare in for Gonnavy, where afterwards we found the Frenchmans boat. The last of November 1593 Monsieur de la
Zanzibar (Tanzania) (search for this): narrative 770
h standeth about 11 degrees to the South of the equinoctial: in which island we stayed all November, finding the people blacke and very comly, but very treacherous and cruell: for the day before we departed from thence they killed thirty of our men on shore, among whom was William Mace our master, and two of his mates; the one of them being in the boat with him to fetch water, the other being on shore against our ship; they having first betrayed our boat. From hence we went for the isle of Zanzibar , on the coast of Melinde, whereas wee stayed and Wintered untill the beginning of February following. The second of February 1592 wee weyed anker, and set saile directly for the East Indies; but having calmes and contrary windes, wee were untill the moneth of June before wee could recover the coast of India neere Calicut ; whereby many of our men died for want of refreshing. In this moneth of June we came to an anker at the isles of Pulo pinaom, whereas we stayed untill the first da
Normandy (France) (search for this): narrative 770
ne; and for want of victuals the company would have forsaken the ship: whereupon the captaine was inforced to sweare every man not to forsake the ship untill we should see further occasion. Out of this bay, called Boca de Dragone, it pleased God to deliver us; from whence we directed our course for the isle of S. Juan de Puerto rico, but fell with the small isle of Mona , where we abode some fifteene dayes, finding in that place some small refreshing. And heere arrived a ship of Caen in Normandy , whereof was captaine one Monsieur Charles de la Barbotiere, who greatly refreshed us with bread and other provision, which we greatly wanted. And so we tooke our leaves the one of the other. In July having foule weather at Mona , we were forced to wey anker, and to set saile, directing our course for Cape Tiburon: and in doubling of the cape we had a gust from the shore, which caried away all our sailes from the yards: so that we had left but one new forecourse to helpe our selves with
Calicut (Kerala, India) (search for this): narrative 770
s, and pinned with woodden pinnes. In this pangaia we had certeine corne called millio, hennes, and some fardels of blew Calicut cloth. The Portugall boy we tooke with us, and dismissed the rest. From this place we went for an island called Comoro, having calmes and contrary windes, wee were untill the moneth of June before wee could recover the coast of India neere Calicut ; whereby many of our men died for want of refreshing. In this moneth of June we came to an anker at the isles of Pulo p we tooke a great Portugall ship of six or seven hundred tun, laden chiefly with victuals, chests of hats, pintados, and Calicut clothes. Besides this we tooke another Portugall ship of some hundred tun, laden with victuals, rice, Calicos, pintados, hennes, cocos, plantans, and other fruits: and within two dayes they brought unto us reals of plate, giving us them for Calicut cloth: which reals they found by diving in the sea, which were lost not long before in two Portugall ships which were bo
James Lancaster, Rere-admirall, with a small pinnesse. Written by Henry May, who in his returne homeward by the West Indies, suffred shipwracke upon the isle of Bermuda , wherof here is annexed a large description. THE tenth of April 1591 we departed from Plymmouth with the ships aforesayd. In May following wee arrived at Granded from a port called Laguna in Hispaniola. The 17 of December next insuing it was his fortune to have his ship cast away upon the Northwest part of the isle of Bermuda about midnight; the pilots making themselves at noone to be to the Southward of the island twelve leagues, certified the captaine that they were out of all dange and so put in our provision of raine-water, and 13 live tortoises for our food, for our voyage which we intended to Newfoundland . In the South part of this Island of Bermuda there are hogs, but they are so leane that you can not eat them, by reason the Island is so barren: but it yeeldeth great store of fowle, fish and tortoises.
India (India) (search for this): narrative 770
tes; the one of them being in the boat with him to fetch water, the other being on shore against our ship; they having first betrayed our boat. From hence we went for the isle of Zanzibar , on the coast of Melinde, whereas wee stayed and Wintered untill the beginning of February following. The second of February 1592 wee weyed anker, and set saile directly for the East Indies; but having calmes and contrary windes, wee were untill the moneth of June before wee could recover the coast of India neere Calicut ; whereby many of our men died for want of refreshing. In this moneth of June we came to an anker at the isles of Pulo pinaom, whereas we stayed untill the first day of September, our men being very sicke, and dying apace. This day we set saile, and directed our course for Malaca : and wee had not bene farre at sea, but wee tooke a shippe of the kingdome of Pegu of some fourescore tunnes with wooden ankers, and about fiftie men in her, with a pinnesse of some eighteene tunne
weyed anker, and that day we doubled the cape of Buona Speranza. The 12 following we were taken with an extreame tempest or huricano. This evening we saw a great sea breake over our admirall the Penelope, and their light strooke out: and after that we never saw them any more. In October following we in the Edward fell with the Westermost part of the isle of S. Laurence about midnight, knowing not where we were. Also the next day we came to an anker at Quitangone a place on the main land of Africa , which is two or three leagues to the Northward of Mozambique, where the Portugals of the isle of Mozambique fetch all their fresh water. Here we tooke a pangaia, with a Portugall boy in it; which is a vessell like a barge, with one matsaile of Coco nut leaves. The barge is sowed together with the rindes of trees, and pinned with woodden pinnes. In this pangaia we had certeine corne called millio, hennes, and some fardels of blew Calicut cloth. The Portugall boy we tooke with us, and dismi
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