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Santos (Sao Paulo, Brazil) (search for this): narrative 936
he South sea. The 19 of November we fell with the bay of Salvador in Brasil . The 16. of December we tooke the towne of Santos , hoping there to revictuall our selves, but it fell not out to our contentment. The 24 of January we set saile from SantSantos , shaping our course for The Streights of Magellan. The 8 of Februarie by violent stormes the sayde fleete was parted: The Robuck and The Desire arrived in Porte Desire the 6 of March. The 16 of March The Black pinnesse arrived there also: and thyou of wheate, porke, and rootes enough. Also I will bring you to an Isle, where Pelicans bee in great abundance, and at Santos wee shall have meale in great plenty, besides all our possibilitie of intercepting some shippes upon the coast of Chili of Jenero very ful of men; whom we mistrusted came from thence to take us : because there came from Jenero souldiers to Santos , when the Generall had taken the towne and was strong in it. Of 76 persons which departed in our ship out of England , w
Ireland (Irish Republic) (search for this): narrative 936
ptaine taking their turnes at the helme, were mightily distressed and monstrously grieved with the most wofull lamentation of our sick men. Thus as lost wanderers upon the sea, the 11 of June 1593, it pleased God that we arrived at Bear-haven in Ireland , and there ran the ship on shore: where the Irish men helped us to take in our sailes, and to more our ship for flooting : which slender paines of theirs cost the captaine some ten pounds before he could have the ship in safetie. Thus withousome ten pounds before he could have the ship in safetie. Thus without victuals, sailes, men, or any furniture God onely guided us into Ireland , where the captaine left the master and three or foure of the company to keepe the ship; and within 5 dayes after he and certaine others had passage in an English fisher-boat to Padstow in Cornewall. In this maner our small remnant by Gods onely mercie were preserved, and restored to our countrey, to whom be all honour and glory world without end.
onely knoweth, and you are in some part a witnesse. And nowe if you thinke good to returne, I will not gainesay it: but this I assure you, if life may be preserved by any meanes, it is in proceeding. For at the Isle of Santa Maria I doe assure you of wheate, porke, and rootes enough. Also I will bring you to an Isle, where Pelicans bee in great abundance, and at Santos wee shall have meale in great plenty, besides all our possibilitie of intercepting some shippes upon the coast of Chili and Peru . But if wee returne there is nothing but death to be hoped for: therefore doe as you like, I am ready, but my desire is to proceede. These his speeches being confirmed by others that were in the former voyage, there was a generall consent of proceeding; and so the second of October we put into the South sea, and were free of all land. This night the winde began to blowe very much at Westnorthwest, and still increased in fury, so that wee were in great doubt what course to take: to put into t
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 936
ped upon my head this bitter calamity now present, but also have in some sort procured the dislike of my best friends in England , as it is not unknowen to some in this company. But now being thus intangled by the providence of God for my former offeet indure this injury, and you shall in no sorte be prejudiced or in any thing be by me commanded: but when we come into England (if God so favour us) your master shall knowe your honesties : in the meane space be voide of these suspicions, for, Godf which many died, & restored us to perfect health of body, so that we were in as good case as when we came first out of England . We stayed in this harbour until the 22 of December, in which time we had dried 20000 Penguins; & the Captaine, the Mast to Santos , when the Generall had taken the towne and was strong in it. Of 76 persons which departed in our ship out of England , we were now left but 27, having lost 13 in this place, with their chiefe furniture, as muskets, calivers, powder, & sho
n most deepe distresse. Then bemoning our estate one to another, and recounting over all our extremities, nothing grieved us more, then the losse of our men twise, first by the slaughter of the Canibals at Port Desire, and at this Ile of Placencia by the Indians and Portugals. And considering what they were that were lost, we found that al those that conspired the murthering of our captaine & master were now slain by salvages, the gunner only excepted. Being thus at sea, when we came to cape Frio , the winde was contrary; so that 3 weekes we were grievously vexed with crosse windes, & our water consuming, our hope of life was very small. Some desired to go to Baya, & to submit themselves to the Portugales, rather then to die for thirst: but the captaine with faire perswasions altered their purpose of yeelding to the Portugales. In this distresse it pleased God to send us raine in such plenty, as that we were wel watered, & in good comfort to returne. But after we came neere unto the s
r the greatest part of them had not clothes to defend the extremitie of the winters cold) being in this heavie distresse, our captaine and Master thought it the best course to depart from the Streights into the South sea, and to go for the Isle of Santa Maria, which is to the Northward of Baldivia in 37 degrees & a quarter, where we might have reliefe, and be in a temperate clime, and there stay for the Generall, for of necessity he must come by that Isle. So we departed the 13 of September, & e of minde I have lived, God onely knoweth, and you are in some part a witnesse. And nowe if you thinke good to returne, I will not gainesay it: but this I assure you, if life may be preserved by any meanes, it is in proceeding. For at the Isle of Santa Maria I doe assure you of wheate, porke, and rootes enough. Also I will bring you to an Isle, where Pelicans bee in great abundance, and at Santos wee shall have meale in great plenty, besides all our possibilitie of intercepting some shippes u
Rosa (Italy) (search for this): narrative 936
that in nature it could not possibly be more, the seas such and so lofty, with continuall breach, that many times we were doubtfull whether our ship did sinke or swimme. The tenth of October being by the accompt of our Captaine and Master very neere the shore, the weather darke, the storme furious, and most of our men having given over to travell, we yeelded our selves to death, without further hope of succour. Our captaine sitting in the gallery very pensive, I came and brought him some Rosa solis to comfort him; for he was so cold, that hee was scarce able to moove a joint. After he had drunke, and was comforted in heart, hee began for the ease of his conscience to make a large repetition of his forepassed time, and with many grievous sighs he concluded in these words: Oh most glorious God, with whose power the mightiest things among men are matters of no moment, I most humbly beseech thee, that the intollerable burthen of my sinnes may through the blood of Jesus Christ be take
Salvador (Bahia, Brazil) (search for this): narrative 936
eparted from Plimmouth under M. Thomas Candish our Generall, with 4 ships of his, to wit, The Galeoh, The Robuck, The Desire, and The Black pinnesse, for the performance of a voyage into The South sea. The 19 of November we fell with the bay of Salvador in Brasil . The 16. of December we tooke the towne of Santos , hoping there to revictuall our selves, but it fell not out to our contentment. The 24 of January we set saile from Santos , shaping our course for The Streights of Magellan. The 8 o salvages, the gunner only excepted. Being thus at sea, when we came to cape Frio , the winde was contrary; so that 3 weekes we were grievously vexed with crosse windes, & our water consuming, our hope of life was very small. Some desired to go to Baya, & to submit themselves to the Portugales, rather then to die for thirst: but the captaine with faire perswasions altered their purpose of yeelding to the Portugales. In this distresse it pleased God to send us raine in such plenty, as that we wer
Padstow (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 936
& sprit-sailes were torne all in pieces by the weather. The master and captaine taking their turnes at the helme, were mightily distressed and monstrously grieved with the most wofull lamentation of our sick men. Thus as lost wanderers upon the sea, the 11 of June 1593, it pleased God that we arrived at Bear-haven in Ireland , and there ran the ship on shore: where the Irish men helped us to take in our sailes, and to more our ship for flooting : which slender paines of theirs cost the captaine some ten pounds before he could have the ship in safetie. Thus without victuals, sailes, men, or any furniture God onely guided us into Ireland , where the captaine left the master and three or foure of the company to keepe the ship; and within 5 dayes after he and certaine others had passage in an English fisher-boat to Padstow in Cornewall. In this maner our small remnant by Gods onely mercie were preserved, and restored to our countrey, to whom be all honour and glory world without end.
Brazil (Brazil) (search for this): narrative 936
ck pinnesse, for the performance of a voyage into The South sea. The 19 of November we fell with the bay of Salvador in Brasil . The 16. of December we tooke the towne of Santos , hoping there to revictuall our selves, but it fell not out to our coskles, our provision was so slender; so that many of our men died in this hard extremitie. Then our General returned for Brasil there to winter, & to procure victuals for this voyage against the next yeere. So we departed The Streights the 15 of Maales and penguins to relieve our selves, and so to make shift to followe the Generall, or there to stay his comming from Brasil . The 24 of May wee had much winde at North. The 25 was calme, and the sea very loftie, so that our ship had dangerous for. So the 22 at night we departed with 14000 dried Penguins, not being able to fetch the rest, and shaped our course for Brasil . Nowe our captaine rated our victuals, and brought us to such allowance, as that our victuals might last sixe moneths; f
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