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testis est, etc. the enumeration corresponds to that in sect. 28, ll. 12-14, above (Civile, Africanum, etc.). Italia, Sicilia., i.e. in the Civil War. Italia: Pompey raised an army to help Sulla against Cinna and Carbo., the Marian leaders (B.C. 83). Sicilia, Africa: after Sulla's final victory in Italy, he entrusted to young Pompey the subjugation of Sicily and Africa, where Carbo, with the remnants of his power, had taken refuge. Fig. 23 shows a coin of Pompey, on which is an allegorical head of Africa. Gallia: this refers to certain hostilities in Gaul when Pompey was on his way to Spain to the war against Sertorius (B.C. 77); these are referred to as bellum Transalpinum in sect. 28. Hispania: in the war with Sertorius (see, however, note on p. 71, l. 5). iterum: Pompey, on his way back from Spain (B.C. 71), fell in with the remnants of the troops of Spartacus and cut them to pieces in Cisalpine Gaul; but the whole passage is a rhetorical exaggeration.
testis est, etc. the enumeration corresponds to that in sect. 28, ll. 12-14, above (Civile, Africanum, etc.). Italia, Sicilia., i.e. in the Civil War. Italia: Pompey raised an army to help Sulla against Cinna and Carbo., the Marian leaders (B.C. 83). Sicilia, Africa: after Sulla's final victory in Italy, he entrusted to young Pompey the subjugation of Sicily and Africa, where Carbo, with the remnants of his power, had taken refuge. Fig. 23 shows a coin of Pompey, on which is an allegorical head of Africa. Gallia: this refers to certain hostilities in Gaul when Pompey was on his way to Spain to the war against Sertorius (B.C. 77); these are referred to as bellum Transalpinum in sect. 28. Hispania: in the war with Sertorius (see, however, note on p. 71, l. 5). iterum: Pompey, on his way back from Spain (B.C. 71), fell in with the remnants of the troops of Spartacus and cut them to pieces in Cisalpine Gaul; but the whole passage is a rhetorical exaggeration.
testis est, etc. the enumeration corresponds to that in sect. 28, ll. 12-14, above (Civile, Africanum, etc.). Italia, Sicilia., i.e. in the Civil War. Italia: Pompey raised an army to help Sulla against Cinna and Carbo., the Marian leaders (B.C. 83). Sicilia, Africa: after Sulla's final victory in Italy, he entrusted to young Pompey the subjugation of Sicily and Africa, where Carbo, with the remnants of his power, had taken refuge. Fig. 23 shows a coin of Pompey, on which is an allegorical head of Africa. Gallia: this refers to certain hostilities in Gaul when Pompey was on his way to Spain to the war against Sertorius (B.C. 77); these are referred to as bellum Transalpinum in sect. 28. Hispania: in the war with Sertorius (see, however, note on p. 71, l. 5). iterum: Pompey, on his way back from Spain (B.C. 71), fell in with the remnants of the troops of Spartacus and cut them to pieces in Cisalpine Gaul; but the whole passage is a rhetorical exaggeration.