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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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th and south at an angle of 18 degrees with the via Lata, and divided into three parts, each of which consisted of a central court surrounded by a porticus and rows of chambers. Extensive remains brought to light by the excavations of the seventeenth century showed, however, that many changes had been made in the barracks after the time of Severus (HJ 461, and literature there cited; NS 1912, 337). II on the Esquiline (Not. Reg. V), at the south end of the Piazza Vittorio Emanuele (CIL vi. 41. V on the Caelian (Not. Reg. II), just west of the Macellum magnum, the present church of S. Stefano Rotondo (CIL vi. 221, 222, 1057, 1058; ib. (not in situ) 2977-83). Besides the inscriptions, some traces of the building were found in the sixteenth century (LS ii. 132) and in 1820 (LR 340). The location of the other three barracks is uncertain: III in Region VI (Not.). The epigraphic evidence is indeterminate (CIL vi. 2969-71, 3761=31320, 32753-6), but the statio was probably just inside the
VIII (Not.), but the inscriptions (CIL vi. 2984-92; 32757) are without topographical value. For a supposed excubitorium in the forum, see NS 1902, 96; BC 1902, 31; Atti 570: CIL vi. 3909. VII in Region XIV (Not.). No traces of the statio of this cohort have been found, but considerable remains of one of the excubitoria were discovered in 1866 at the monte de' Fiori, near the church of S. Crisogono. The building, which appears to have been originally a large private house, belongs to the second century with later additions, and on its walls are many graffiti (CIL vi. 2998-3091), dating from 215 to 245 A.D. and containing much information in regard to the organisation of the corps. The portion excavated consists of a central atrium with mosaic pavement and a hexagonal fountain, and adjacent apartments, among them a lararium and a balneum (Bull. d. Inst. 1867, 8-30; Ann. d. Inst. 1874, 111-163; cf. BC 1886, 266-269; LR 549; CIL vi. 2993-2997, 32751; Mau, Gesch. d. Wandmalerei, 461). Som
osed excubitorium in the forum, see NS 1902, 96; BC 1902, 31; Atti 570: CIL vi. 3909. VII in Region XIV (Not.). No traces of the statio of this cohort have been found, but considerable remains of one of the excubitoria were discovered in 1866 at the monte de' Fiori, near the church of S. Crisogono. The building, which appears to have been originally a large private house, belongs to the second century with later additions, and on its walls are many graffiti (CIL vi. 2998-3091), dating from 215 to 245 A.D. and containing much information in regard to the organisation of the corps. The portion excavated consists of a central atrium with mosaic pavement and a hexagonal fountain, and adjacent apartments, among them a lararium and a balneum (Bull. d. Inst. 1867, 8-30; Ann. d. Inst. 1874, 111-163; cf. BC 1886, 266-269; LR 549; CIL vi. 2993-2997, 32751; Mau, Gesch. d. Wandmalerei, 461). Some authorities place the other excubitorium in the ninth region, because in one of the graffiti (CIL vi.