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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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.) and Pol. Silvius (545). It was probably a new construction of the Emperor Probus (276-282) rather than a rebuilding of an older bridge, and situated below the other bridges as it stands last in the list. It is now generally identified with a still later bridge, which crossed the Tiber a little south of the north corner of the Aventine, and was called in the Middle Ages pons marmoreus Theodosii (Mirab. II) and pons Theodosii in ripa r(o)mea (Graphia 10). From the letters and reports of Symmachus (Ep. iv. 70; v. 76; Relat. 25, 26) it appears that work was begun on this bridge before 384 but not completed in 387, and while the structure is called novus, it is usually believed to have been a rebuilding of the pons Probi. This bridge was partially destroyed in the eleventh century and almost entirely in 1484. The last traces of its piers were removed from the bed of the river in 1878 (Jord. i. I. 421-422; Gilb. iii. 262; Mitt. 1893, 320; BC 1877, 167; 1892, 261,262; LR 16, 17; DuP 86).
.) and Pol. Silvius (545). It was probably a new construction of the Emperor Probus (276-282) rather than a rebuilding of an older bridge, and situated below the other bridges as it stands last in the list. It is now generally identified with a still later bridge, which crossed the Tiber a little south of the north corner of the Aventine, and was called in the Middle Ages pons marmoreus Theodosii (Mirab. II) and pons Theodosii in ripa r(o)mea (Graphia 10). From the letters and reports of Symmachus (Ep. iv. 70; v. 76; Relat. 25, 26) it appears that work was begun on this bridge before 384 but not completed in 387, and while the structure is called novus, it is usually believed to have been a rebuilding of the pons Probi. This bridge was partially destroyed in the eleventh century and almost entirely in 1484. The last traces of its piers were removed from the bed of the river in 1878 (Jord. i. I. 421-422; Gilb. iii. 262; Mitt. 1893, 320; BC 1877, 167; 1892, 261,262; LR 16, 17; DuP 86).
1000 AD - 1099 AD (search for this): entry pons-probi
.) and Pol. Silvius (545). It was probably a new construction of the Emperor Probus (276-282) rather than a rebuilding of an older bridge, and situated below the other bridges as it stands last in the list. It is now generally identified with a still later bridge, which crossed the Tiber a little south of the north corner of the Aventine, and was called in the Middle Ages pons marmoreus Theodosii (Mirab. II) and pons Theodosii in ripa r(o)mea (Graphia 10). From the letters and reports of Symmachus (Ep. iv. 70; v. 76; Relat. 25, 26) it appears that work was begun on this bridge before 384 but not completed in 387, and while the structure is called novus, it is usually believed to have been a rebuilding of the pons Probi. This bridge was partially destroyed in the eleventh century and almost entirely in 1484. The last traces of its piers were removed from the bed of the river in 1878 (Jord. i. I. 421-422; Gilb. iii. 262; Mitt. 1893, 320; BC 1877, 167; 1892, 261,262; LR 16, 17; DuP 86).