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Ahenobarbus 9. L. Domitius Cn. F. L. N. AHENOBARBUS, son of the preceding, was betrothed in B. C. 36, at the meeting of Octavianus and Antony at Tarentum, to Antonia, the daughter of the latter by Octavia. He was aedile in B. C. 22, and consul in B. C. 16. After his consulship, and probably as the successor of Tiberius, he commanded the Roman army in Germany, crossed the Elbe, and penetrated further into the country than any of his predecessors had done. He received in consequence the insignia of a triumph. He died A. D. 25. Suetonius describes him as haughty, prodigal, and cruel, and relates that in his aedileship he commanded the censor L. Plancus to make way for him; and that in his praetorship and consulship he brought Roman knights and matrons on the stage. He exhibited shows of wild beasts in every quarter of the city, and his gladiatorial combats were conducted with so much bloodshed, that Augustus was obliged to put some restraint upon them. (Suet. Nero 4; Tac. Ann. 4.44; D. C
mitius Cn. F. L. N. AHENOBARBUS, son of the preceding, was betrothed in B. C. 36, at the meeting of Octavianus and Antony at Tarentum, to Antonia, the daughter of the latter by Octavia. He was aedile in B. C. 22, and consul in B. C. 16. After his consulship, and probably as the successor of Tiberius, he commanded the Roman army in Germany, crossed the Elbe, and penetrated further into the country than any of his predecessors had done. He received in consequence the insignia of a triumph. He died A. D. 25. Suetonius describes him as haughty, prodigal, and cruel, and relates that in his aedileship he commanded the censor L. Plancus to make way for him; and that in his praetorship and consulship he brought Roman knights and matrons on the stage. He exhibited shows of wild beasts in every quarter of the city, and his gladiatorial combats were conducted with so much bloodshed, that Augustus was obliged to put some restraint upon them. (Suet. Nero 4; Tac. Ann. 4.44; D. C. 54.59; Vell. 2.72.)
Ahenobarbus 9. L. Domitius Cn. F. L. N. AHENOBARBUS, son of the preceding, was betrothed in B. C. 36, at the meeting of Octavianus and Antony at Tarentum, to Antonia, the daughter of the latter by Octavia. He was aedile in B. C. 22, and consul in B. C. 16. After his consulship, and probably as the successor of Tiberius, he commanded the Roman army in Germany, crossed the Elbe, and penetrated further into the country than any of his predecessors had done. He received in consequence the insignia of a triumph. He died A. D. 25. Suetonius describes him as haughty, prodigal, and cruel, and relates that in his aedileship he commanded the censor L. Plancus to make way for him; and that in his praetorship and consulship he brought Roman knights and matrons on the stage. He exhibited shows of wild beasts in every quarter of the city, and his gladiatorial combats were conducted with so much bloodshed, that Augustus was obliged to put some restraint upon them. (Suet. Nero 4; Tac. Ann. 4.44; D. C
Ahenobarbus 9. L. Domitius Cn. F. L. N. AHENOBARBUS, son of the preceding, was betrothed in B. C. 36, at the meeting of Octavianus and Antony at Tarentum, to Antonia, the daughter of the latter by Octavia. He was aedile in B. C. 22, and consul in B. C. 16. After his consulship, and probably as the successor of Tiberius, he commanded the Roman army in Germany, crossed the Elbe, and penetrated further into the country than any of his predecessors had done. He received in consequence the insignia of a triumph. He died A. D. 25. Suetonius describes him as haughty, prodigal, and cruel, and relates that in his aedileship he commanded the censor L. Plancus to make way for him; and that in his praetorship and consulship he brought Roman knights and matrons on the stage. He exhibited shows of wild beasts in every quarter of the city, and his gladiatorial combats were conducted with so much bloodshed, that Augustus was obliged to put some restraint upon them. (Suet. Nero 4; Tac. Ann. 4.44; D. C