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on account of his conspiring against Augustus. The nature of this relationship is, however, not clear. The full name of this Murena was A. Terentius Varro Murena, and Drumann conjectures that he was the son of L. Licinius Murena, who was consul B. C. 62, and that he was adopted by A. Terentius Varro. The same writer farther conjectures that Proculeius was the son of C. Licinius Murena, the brother of the consul of B. C. 62, and that he was adopted by some one of the name of Proculeius. In that B. C. 62, and that he was adopted by some one of the name of Proculeius. In that case Proculeius would have been the cousin of Murena. We know that it was common among the Romans to call cousins by the name of brothers (frater patruelis and frater). (Drumann, Geschichte Roms, vol. iv. pp. 193, 194.) The great intimacy of Proculeius with Augustus is attested by many writers. (Dio Cass. l.c. ; Tac. Ann. 4.40; Plin. Nat. 7.45. s. 46, 36.25. s. 59.) Dio Cassius (l.c.) speaks of him and Maecenas as the principal friends of the emperor, and they both interceded, but to no purpos
calls him Procleius (Plut. Ant. 77-79; D. C. 51.11.) It is of this Proculeius that Horace speaks (Carm. 2.2) :-- Vivet extento Proculeius aevo, Notus in fratres animi paterni: and Porphyrio relates, in his commentary on this passage, that Proculeius divided his property with his brothers Caepio (not Scipio as in some editions) and Murena, who had lost their property in the civil wars. It is also stated by Dio Cassius (54.3), that Proculeius was a brother of the Murena, who was condemned, in B. C. 22, on account of his conspiring against Augustus. The nature of this relationship is, however, not clear. The full name of this Murena was A. Terentius Varro Murena, and Drumann conjectures that he was the son of L. Licinius Murena, who was consul B. C. 62, and that he was adopted by A. Terentius Varro. The same writer farther conjectures that Proculeius was the son of C. Licinius Murena, the brother of the consul of B. C. 62, and that he was adopted by some one of the name of Proculeius. In