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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

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Carri'nas 1. C. Carrinas, is mentioned first as the commander of a detachment of the Marian party, with which he attacked Pompey, who was levying troops in Picenum to strengthen the forces of Sulla in B. C. 83, immediately after his arrival in Italy. In the year after, B. C. 82, Carrinas was legate of the consul Cn. Papirius Carbo [CARBO, No. 7.], and fought a battle on the river Aesis, in Umbria, against Metellus, in which however he was beaten. He was attacked soon after in the neighbourhood of Spoletium, by Pompey and Crassus, two of Sulla's generals, and after a loss of nearly 3000 men, he was besieged by the enemy, but found means to escape during a dark and stormy night. After Carbo had quitted Italy, Carrinas and Marcius continued to command two legions ; and after joining Damasippus and the Sanmites, who were still in arms, they marched towards the passes of Praeneste, hoping to force their way through them and relieve Marius, who was still besieged in that town. But when this
Carri'nas 1. C. Carrinas, is mentioned first as the commander of a detachment of the Marian party, with which he attacked Pompey, who was levying troops in Picenum to strengthen the forces of Sulla in B. C. 83, immediately after his arrival in Italy. In the year after, B. C. 82, Carrinas was legate of the consul Cn. Papirius Carbo [CARBO, No. 7.], and fought a battle on the river Aesis, in Umbria, against Metellus, in which however he was beaten. He was attacked soon after in the neighbourhood of Spoletium, by Pompey and Crassus, two of Sulla's generals, and after a loss of nearly 3000 men, he was besieged by the enemy, but found means to escape during a dark and stormy night. After Carbo had quitted Italy, Carrinas and Marcius continued to command two legions ; and after joining Damasippus and the Sanmites, who were still in arms, they marched towards the passes of Praeneste, hoping to force their way through them and relieve Marius, who was still besieged in that town. But when this