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tribune, Decianus, brought an accusation against him. In B. C. 100 he was the colleague of C. Marius, in his sixth consulship. During the disturbances of L. Appuleius Saturninus, the consuls were ordered by the senate to avail themselves of the assistance of the tribunes and praetors, for the purpose of maintaining the dignity of the republic. In consequence of this, Valerius Flaccus put to death Saturninus, Glaucia, and others of the revolutionary party. Four years after these occurrences, B. C. 97, he was censor with M. Antonius, the orator. In B. C. 86, when Marius had died, in his seventh consulship, L. Valerius Flaccus was chosen by Cinna as his colleague, in the place of Marius, and received the commission to go into Asia, to resist Sulla, and to bring the war against Mithridates to a close. He was accompanied on this expedition by C. Flavius Fimbria. Flaccus was avaricious, and very cruel in his punishments, whence he was so unpopular with the soldiers, that many of them deserte
Flaccus, Vale'rius 11. L. Valerius Flaccus, probably a son of No. 10, and the father of L. Valerius Flaccus, whom Cicero defended. [See No. 15.] When he was curule aedile, the tribune, Decianus, brought an accusation against him. In B. C. 100 he was the colleague of C. Marius, in his sixth consulship. During the disturbances of L. Appuleius Saturninus, the consuls were ordered by the senate to avail themselves of the assistance of the tribunes and praetors, for the purpose of maintaining the dignity of the republic. In consequence of this, Valerius Flaccus put to death Saturninus, Glaucia, and others of the revolutionary party. Four years after these occurrences, B. C. 97, he was censor with M. Antonius, the orator. In B. C. 86, when Marius had died, in his seventh consulship, L. Valerius Flaccus was chosen by Cinna as his colleague, in the place of Marius, and received the commission to go into Asia, to resist Sulla, and to bring the war against Mithridates to a close. He was accomp
intaining the dignity of the republic. In consequence of this, Valerius Flaccus put to death Saturninus, Glaucia, and others of the revolutionary party. Four years after these occurrences, B. C. 97, he was censor with M. Antonius, the orator. In B. C. 86, when Marius had died, in his seventh consulship, L. Valerius Flaccus was chosen by Cinna as his colleague, in the place of Marius, and received the commission to go into Asia, to resist Sulla, and to bring the war against Mithridates to a closecomedeia, and shut the gates against his pursuer, but Fimbria had him dragged forth, and murdered him : his head was thrown into the sea, and his body was left unburied. Most authorities place the murder of Flaccus in the year of his consulship, B. C. 86, but Velleius (2.23, 24) places it a year later. At the beginning of his consulship, Flaccus had carried a law, by which it was decreed that debts should be cancelled, and only a quadrans be paid to the creditors, and his violent death was regar