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th the assistance of Caecilius and Memmius. In B. C. 49 he returned from exile, upon the call of Caesar, but he took no part in direct hostilities against Pompey. After the battle of Pharsalia, he was despatched to Illyricum with the newly levied troops, in order to reinforce Q. Cornificius. Fearing the fleet of the Pompeiani, he went by land, and, on his march, was much harassed by the Dalmatians. In the neighbourhood of Salonae, after having lost more than 2000 men in an engagement with the natives, he threw himself into the town with the remainder of his forces, and for some time defended himself bravely against M. Octavius, but, in a few months, he was seized with a mortal illness, and died about the end of the year B. C. 48, or the beginning of the following year. (Appian, App. Ill. 12 and 27, Bell. Civ. 2.59; D. C. 42.11, 12.) (A. Rachenstein, Ueber A. Gabinius ein Programm. 8vo. Aarau. 1826; Drumann, Gesch. Roms. vol. iv. pp. 40-62, where all the authorities are collected.)
as liable to make up the deficiency, if it could be proved that the money illegally received by Gabinius had come to his hands. Thus the cause of C. Rabirius Postumus (who was also defended by Cicero) was a supplementary ap pendage to the cause of Gabinius. [POSTUMUS, C. RABIRIUS] Upon the exile of Gabinius the third accusation dropped, which charged him with ambitus, or illegal canvassing, and was entrusted to P. Sulla, as as prosecutor, with the assistance of Caecilius and Memmius. In B. C. 49 he returned from exile, upon the call of Caesar, but he took no part in direct hostilities against Pompey. After the battle of Pharsalia, he was despatched to Illyricum with the newly levied troops, in order to reinforce Q. Cornificius. Fearing the fleet of the Pompeiani, he went by land, and, on his march, was much harassed by the Dalmatians. In the neighbourhood of Salonae, after having lost more than 2000 men in an engagement with the natives, he threw himself into the town with the rem
Syrian coast, which Gabinius had left unguarded during his expedition to Egypt. The recall of Gabinius from his province had been decreed in B. C. 55, but he did not depart until his successor, M. Crassus, had actually made his appearance, in B. C. 54. He lingered on the road, and his gold travelled before him, to purchase favour or silence. To cover his disgrace, lie gave out that he intended to demand a triumph, and lie remained some time without the city gates, but, finding delay useless, on the 28th of September, B. C. 54, he stole into the city by night, to avoid the insults of the populace. For tell days he did not dare to present himself before the senate. When at length he came, and had made the usual report as to the state of the Roman forces, and as to the troops of the enemy, he was about to go away, when he was detained by the consuls, L. Domitius Ahenobarbus and App. Claudius, to answer the accusation of the publicani, who had been in attendance at the doors, and were c
t Rome, where Gabinius knew that he would have to encounter not only the hostility of the optimates, but all the unpopularity which his personal enemies could excite against him. He had given umbrage to the Romans in Syria, especially to the publicani of the equestrian order, whose profits were dimi nished by the depredations of the pirates along the Syrian coast, which Gabinius had left unguarded during his expedition to Egypt. The recall of Gabinius from his province had been decreed in B. C. 55, but he did not depart until his successor, M. Crassus, had actually made his appearance, in B. C. 54. He lingered on the road, and his gold travelled before him, to purchase favour or silence. To cover his disgrace, lie gave out that he intended to demand a triumph, and lie remained some time without the city gates, but, finding delay useless, on the 28th of September, B. C. 54, he stole into the city by night, to avoid the insults of the populace. For tell days he did not dare to present
upreme council. (J. AJ 4.10, de Bell. Jud. 1.6.) It was perhaps on account of some of his successes in Judea that Gabinius made application to the senate to be honoured with a supplicatio ; but the senate, in order to evince their hostility to him and his patron Pompey, slighted his letter, and rejected his suit--an affront which had never before been offered, under similar circumstances, to any proconsul. (Ad Qu. Fr. 2.8.) As the refusal of the senate occurred in the early part of the year B. C. 56, Drumann (Gesch. Roms. vol. iii. p. 47, n. 35) thinks that it referred to some successes of Gabinius over the Arabs, previous to his campaigns in Judea. Gabinius now sought for other enemies, against whom he might profitably turn his arms. Phraates, king of Parthia, had been murdered by his two sons, Orodes and Mithridates, who afterwards contended between themselves for the crown. Mithridates, feeling himself the weaker of the two, by presents and promises engaged Gabinius to undertake h
read of another Lex Gabinia, by which the senate was directed to give audience to ambassadors from the 1st of February to the 1st of March. By a previous Lex Pupia the senate was prohibited in general terms from assembling on comitial days. Under these laws arose the question whether the senate might be legally assembled on a comitial day, occurring in February, or whether such days were not tacitly excepted from the Lex Gabinia. (Ad Qu. Fr. 2.13.) In B. C. 61 Gabinius was praetor, and in B. C. 59 he and L. Piso were chosen consuls for the ensuing year. In the interval between his tribunate and his praetorship he appears to have been engaged in military service in the East, and to have accompanied M. Scaurus to Judea, where, in the contest between the Maccabees, he received a bribe of 300 talents from Aristobulus. (J. AJ 14.2, 3, 4.) The consuls, Gabinius and Piso, had previously been gained over to the party of Clodius, who promised to use his influence in procuring for them lucra
the legal rate. (Ad Att. 6.2.5.) We read of another Lex Gabinia, by which the senate was directed to give audience to ambassadors from the 1st of February to the 1st of March. By a previous Lex Pupia the senate was prohibited in general terms from assembling on comitial days. Under these laws arose the question whether the senate might be legally assembled on a comitial day, occurring in February, or whether such days were not tacitly excepted from the Lex Gabinia. (Ad Qu. Fr. 2.13.) In B. C. 61 Gabinius was praetor, and in B. C. 59 he and L. Piso were chosen consuls for the ensuing year. In the interval between his tribunate and his praetorship he appears to have been engaged in military service in the East, and to have accompanied M. Scaurus to Judea, where, in the contest between the Maccabees, he received a bribe of 300 talents from Aristobulus. (J. AJ 14.2, 3, 4.) The consuls, Gabinius and Piso, had previously been gained over to the party of Clodius, who promised to use his
ed hair was fragrant with unguents, and his checks were coloured with rouge. He was a proficient in the dance, and his house resounded with music and song. If we may trust the angry invective of Cicero (pro Sext. 8, 9, post Red. in Sen. 4-8, in Pison. 11, pro Domo. 24, 48), he kept the most vicious company, and led the most impure and profligate life. having dissipated his fortune by such a course of conduct, he looked to official station as the means of repairing his shattered finances. In B. C. 66 he was made tribune of the plebs, and moved that the command of the war against the pirates should be given to Pompey. The proposed law did not name Pompey, but it plainly pointed to him, and was calculated to make him almost an absolute monarch. Among other provisions, it directed that the people should elect a commander whose imperium should extend over the whole of the Mediterranean, and to a distance of fifty miles inland from its coasts,--who should take such sums of money as he might