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. 2.1. 49), is said to have been one of the judices corrupted by Hortensius. This domination over the courts continued up to about the year B. C. 70, when Hortensius was retained by Verres against Cicero. Cicero had come to Rome from Athens in B. C. 81, and first met Hortensius as the advocate of P. Quinctius. Cicero's speech is extant, and not the least interesting part is that in which he describes and admits the extraordinary gifts of his future rival (pro Quinct. 1, 2, 22, 24, 26). But Cicero again left Rome, and did not finally settle there till B. C. 74, about three years before the Verrine affair came on. Meantime, Hortensius had begun his course of civil honours. He was quaestor in B. C. 81, and Cicero himself bears witness to the integrity with which his accounts were kept (in Verr. 1.14, 39). Soon after he defended M. Canuleius (Brut. 92) ; Cn. Dolabella, when accused of extortion in Cilicia by M. Scaurus; another Cn. Dolabella, arraigned by Caesar for like offences in Ma
ed of extortion in Asia, jointly with Cicero, and took occasion to extol the acts of the latter in his consulship (ad Att. 2.25). He also pleaded the cause of P. Lentulus Spinther, against whom Pompey had promoted an accusation for his conduct respecting Ptolemy Auletes, though Cicero, fearing a second banishment, declined the office (ad Fam. 1.1, 2.1). He joined Cicero again iN the defence of Sextius, and again allowed him to speak last (pro Sext. 2.6). When the latter was in his province (B. C. 51), Hortensius defended his own nephew, M. Valerius Messalla, who was accused of bribery in canvassing for the consulship. He was, as usual, successful; but the case was so flagrant, that, next day, when Hortensius entered the theatre of Curio, he was received with a round of hisses--a thing mainly remarkable, because it was the first time lie had suffered any thing of the kind (ad Fam. 8.2). In the beginning of April, B. C. 50, he appeared for the last time, with his wonted success, for App.
ssus (erroneously called the first triumvirate). Hortensius now drew back from public life, seeing probably that his own party must yield to the arts and power of the coalition, and yet not choosing to forsake it. From this time to his death (in B. C. 50) he confined himself to his advocate's duties. He defended Flaccus, accused of extortion in Asia, jointly with Cicero, and took occasion to extol the acts of the latter in his consulship (ad Att. 2.25). He also pleaded the cause of P. Lentulus Srant, that, next day, when Hortensius entered the theatre of Curio, he was received with a round of hisses--a thing mainly remarkable, because it was the first time lie had suffered any thing of the kind (ad Fam. 8.2). In the beginning of April, B. C. 50, he appeared for the last time, with his wonted success, for App. Claudius, accused de majestate et ambitu by Dolabella, the future sonin-law of Cicero. He died not long after. Cicero received the news of his death at Rhodes, as he was returning
forensic pursuits were soon interrupted by the Social War, in which he was obliged to serve two campaigns (B. C. 91, 90), in the first as a legionary, in the second as tribunus militum (Brut. 89). In the year 86 B. C. he defended young Cn. Pompeius, who was accused of having embezzled some of the public booty taken at Asculum in the course of the war (Brut. (64). But, for the most part, the courts were silent during the anarchy which followed the Marian massacres, up to the return of Sulla, B. C. 83. But these troubles, though they checked the young orator in his career, left him complete master of the courts--rex judiciorum,-- as Cicero calls him (Divin. in Q. Caecil. 7). For Crassus had died before the landing of Marius ; Antonius, Catulus, and others fell victims in the massacres; and Cotta, who survived, yielded the first place to his younger rival. Hortensius, therefore, began his brilliant professional cancer anew, and was carried along on the top of the wave till he met a more p
Horte'nsius 6. Q. Hortensius, L. F., the orator, born in B. C. 114, eight years before Cicero, the same year that L. Crassus made his famous speech for the Vestal Licinia (Cic. Brut. 64, 94). At the early age of nineteen he appeared in the forum, and his first speech gained the applause of the consuls, L. Crassus and Q. Scaevola, the former the greatest orator, the latter the first jurist of the day. Crassus also heard his second speech for Nicomedes, king of Bithynia, who had been expelled by his brother Chrestus. His client was restored (Cic. de Orat. 3.61). By these speeches Hortensius at once rose to eminence as an advocate. Q. Hortensius, says Cicero, ad modum adolescentis ingenium simul spectatum et probatum est (Brut. 64). But his forensic pursuits were soon interrupted by the Social War, in which he was obliged to serve two campaigns (B. C. 91, 90), in the first as a legionary, in the second as tribunus militum (Brut. 89). In the year 86 B. C. he defended young Cn. Pompeius,
onent before him, unless he had good warrant for its truth. Turius, or Furins, mentioned by Horace (Scrm. 2.1. 49), is said to have been one of the judices corrupted by Hortensius. This domination over the courts continued up to about the year B. C. 70, when Hortensius was retained by Verres against Cicero. Cicero had come to Rome from Athens in B. C. 81, and first met Hortensius as the advocate of P. Quinctius. Cicero's speech is extant, and not the least interesting part is that in which he e on the other side was (Instit. 10.1). It is true also that Verres was backed by all the power of the Sullane aristocracy. But this party had been much weakened by the measures passed by Pompey in his consulship with Crassus in the year before (B. C. 70). Especially, the Aemilian law, which transferred the judicial power from the senators to the senators, equites, and tribune aerarii conjointly, must have very much weakened the influence of Hortensius and his party. (Ascon. and Cic. in Pison. p
cia by M. Scaurus; another Cn. Dolabella, arraigned by Caesar for like offences in Macedonia [DOLABELLA, Nos. 5, 6]. In B. C. 75 he was aediie, Cotta the orator being consul, and Cicero quaestor in Sicily (Brut. 92). The games and shows he exhibited as aedile were long remembered for their extaordinary splendour (Cic. de )Off. 2.16); but great part of this splendour was the loan of those noble clients, whose robberies he had so successfully excused (Cic. in Verr. 1.19, 22; Ascon. ad l.). In B. C. 72 he was praetor urbanus, and had the task of trying those delinquents whom he had hitherto defended. In B. C. 69 he reached the summit of civic ambition, being consul for that year with Q. Caecilius Metellus. After his consulship the province of Crete feii to him by lot, but he resigned it in favour of his colleague. It was in the year before his consulship, after he was designated, that the prosecution of Verres commenced. Cicero was then aedile-elect, though Hortensius and his party had
y settle there till B. C. 74, about three years before the Verrine affair came on. Meantime, Hortensius had begun his course of civil honours. He was quaestor in B. C. 81, and Cicero himself bears witness to the integrity with which his accounts were kept (in Verr. 1.14, 39). Soon after he defended M. Canuleius (Brut. 92) ; Cn. Dolabella, when accused of extortion in Cilicia by M. Scaurus; another Cn. Dolabella, arraigned by Caesar for like offences in Macedonia [DOLABELLA, Nos. 5, 6]. In B. C. 75 he was aediie, Cotta the orator being consul, and Cicero quaestor in Sicily (Brut. 92). The games and shows he exhibited as aedile were long remembered for their extaordinary splendour (Cic. de )Off. 2.16); but great part of this splendour was the loan of those noble clients, whose robberies he had so successfully excused (Cic. in Verr. 1.19, 22; Ascon. ad l.). In B. C. 72 he was praetor urbanus, and had the task of trying those delinquents whom he had hitherto defended. In B. C. 69 he reac
y Hortensius. This domination over the courts continued up to about the year B. C. 70, when Hortensius was retained by Verres against Cicero. Cicero had come to Rome from Athens in B. C. 81, and first met Hortensius as the advocate of P. Quinctius. Cicero's speech is extant, and not the least interesting part is that in which he describes and admits the extraordinary gifts of his future rival (pro Quinct. 1, 2, 22, 24, 26). But Cicero again left Rome, and did not finally settle there till B. C. 74, about three years before the Verrine affair came on. Meantime, Hortensius had begun his course of civil honours. He was quaestor in B. C. 81, and Cicero himself bears witness to the integrity with which his accounts were kept (in Verr. 1.14, 39). Soon after he defended M. Canuleius (Brut. 92) ; Cn. Dolabella, when accused of extortion in Cilicia by M. Scaurus; another Cn. Dolabella, arraigned by Caesar for like offences in Macedonia [DOLABELLA, Nos. 5, 6]. In B. C. 75 he was aediie, Cott
, Hortensius took a leading part in supporting the optimates against the rising power of Pompey. He opposed the Gabinian law, which invested that great commander with absolute power on the Mediterranean, in order to put down the pirates of Cilicia (B. C. 67); and the Manilian, by which the conduct of the war against Mithridates was transferred from Lucullus (of the Sullane party) to Pompeius (B. C. 66). In favour of the latter, Cicero made his first political speech. In the memorable year B. C. 63 Cicero was unanimously elected consul. He had already become estranged from the popular party, with whom he had hitherto acted. The intrigues of Caesar and Crassus, who supported his opponents C. Antonius and the notorious Catiline, touched him personally; and he found it his duty as consul to oppose the turbulent measures of the popular leaders, such as the agrarian law of Rullus. Above all, the conspiracy of Catiline, to which Crassus was suspected of being privy, forced him to combine wi
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