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ntulus 39. COSSUS CORNELIUS CN. F. LENTULUS GAETULICUS, son probably of No. 37, is sometimes called Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Cossus. The former, however, is more usual; but as we find on coins both COSSVS CN. F. LENTVLVS, and CN. LENTVLVS COSSVS, it would seem that he might be called indifferently either Cneius or Cossus (Pighius, vol. iii. p. 531). Cossus was originally a family name in the Cornelia gens, and was first assumed as a praenomen by this Lentulus. [COSSUS.] Lentulus was consul B. C. 1, with L. Calpurnius Piso, and in A. D. 6 was sent into Africa, where he defeated the Gaetuli, who had invaded the kingdom of Juba. In consequence of this success he received the surname of Gaetulicus and the ornamenta triumphalia. (D. C. 55.28; Veil. Pat. 2.116; Flor. 4.12.40; Oros. 6.21; Tac. Ann. 4.44.) On the accession of Tiberius in A. D. 14, he accompanied Drusus, who was sent to quell the mutiny of the legions in Pannonia. The mutineers were especially incensed against Lentulus, becau
rname of Gaetulicus and the ornamenta triumphalia. (D. C. 55.28; Veil. Pat. 2.116; Flor. 4.12.40; Oros. 6.21; Tac. Ann. 4.44.) On the accession of Tiberius in A. D. 14, he accompanied Drusus, who was sent to quell the mutiny of the legions in Pannonia. The mutineers were especially incensed against Lentulus, because they thought that from his age and military glory he would judge their offences most severely; and on one occasion he narrowly escaped death at their hands. Cn. Lentulus is again mentioned in A. D. 16, in the debate in the senate respecting Libo, also in A. D. 22 in the debate respecting Silanus, and again in A. D. 24, when he was falsely accused of majestas, but Tiberius would not allow the charge to be prosecuted. He died A. D. 25, at a very great age, leaving behind him an honourable reputation. He had endured poverty, says Tacitus, with patience, acquired a great fortune by honest means, and enjoyed it with moderation. (Tac. Ann. 1.27, 2.32, 3.68, 4.29,44; D. C. 57.24.)
rname of Gaetulicus and the ornamenta triumphalia. (D. C. 55.28; Veil. Pat. 2.116; Flor. 4.12.40; Oros. 6.21; Tac. Ann. 4.44.) On the accession of Tiberius in A. D. 14, he accompanied Drusus, who was sent to quell the mutiny of the legions in Pannonia. The mutineers were especially incensed against Lentulus, because they thought that from his age and military glory he would judge their offences most severely; and on one occasion he narrowly escaped death at their hands. Cn. Lentulus is again mentioned in A. D. 16, in the debate in the senate respecting Libo, also in A. D. 22 in the debate respecting Silanus, and again in A. D. 24, when he was falsely accused of majestas, but Tiberius would not allow the charge to be prosecuted. He died A. D. 25, at a very great age, leaving behind him an honourable reputation. He had endured poverty, says Tacitus, with patience, acquired a great fortune by honest means, and enjoyed it with moderation. (Tac. Ann. 1.27, 2.32, 3.68, 4.29,44; D. C. 57.24.)
rname of Gaetulicus and the ornamenta triumphalia. (D. C. 55.28; Veil. Pat. 2.116; Flor. 4.12.40; Oros. 6.21; Tac. Ann. 4.44.) On the accession of Tiberius in A. D. 14, he accompanied Drusus, who was sent to quell the mutiny of the legions in Pannonia. The mutineers were especially incensed against Lentulus, because they thought that from his age and military glory he would judge their offences most severely; and on one occasion he narrowly escaped death at their hands. Cn. Lentulus is again mentioned in A. D. 16, in the debate in the senate respecting Libo, also in A. D. 22 in the debate respecting Silanus, and again in A. D. 24, when he was falsely accused of majestas, but Tiberius would not allow the charge to be prosecuted. He died A. D. 25, at a very great age, leaving behind him an honourable reputation. He had endured poverty, says Tacitus, with patience, acquired a great fortune by honest means, and enjoyed it with moderation. (Tac. Ann. 1.27, 2.32, 3.68, 4.29,44; D. C. 57.24.)
rname of Gaetulicus and the ornamenta triumphalia. (D. C. 55.28; Veil. Pat. 2.116; Flor. 4.12.40; Oros. 6.21; Tac. Ann. 4.44.) On the accession of Tiberius in A. D. 14, he accompanied Drusus, who was sent to quell the mutiny of the legions in Pannonia. The mutineers were especially incensed against Lentulus, because they thought that from his age and military glory he would judge their offences most severely; and on one occasion he narrowly escaped death at their hands. Cn. Lentulus is again mentioned in A. D. 16, in the debate in the senate respecting Libo, also in A. D. 22 in the debate respecting Silanus, and again in A. D. 24, when he was falsely accused of majestas, but Tiberius would not allow the charge to be prosecuted. He died A. D. 25, at a very great age, leaving behind him an honourable reputation. He had endured poverty, says Tacitus, with patience, acquired a great fortune by honest means, and enjoyed it with moderation. (Tac. Ann. 1.27, 2.32, 3.68, 4.29,44; D. C. 57.24.)
LUS GAETULICUS, son probably of No. 37, is sometimes called Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Cossus. The former, however, is more usual; but as we find on coins both COSSVS CN. F. LENTVLVS, and CN. LENTVLVS COSSVS, it would seem that he might be called indifferently either Cneius or Cossus (Pighius, vol. iii. p. 531). Cossus was originally a family name in the Cornelia gens, and was first assumed as a praenomen by this Lentulus. [COSSUS.] Lentulus was consul B. C. 1, with L. Calpurnius Piso, and in A. D. 6 was sent into Africa, where he defeated the Gaetuli, who had invaded the kingdom of Juba. In consequence of this success he received the surname of Gaetulicus and the ornamenta triumphalia. (D. C. 55.28; Veil. Pat. 2.116; Flor. 4.12.40; Oros. 6.21; Tac. Ann. 4.44.) On the accession of Tiberius in A. D. 14, he accompanied Drusus, who was sent to quell the mutiny of the legions in Pannonia. The mutineers were especially incensed against Lentulus, because they thought that from his age and mil