hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
43 BC 170 170 Browse Search
44 BC 146 146 Browse Search
49 BC 140 140 Browse Search
45 BC 124 124 Browse Search
54 BC 121 121 Browse Search
46 BC 119 119 Browse Search
63 BC 109 109 Browse Search
48 BC 106 106 Browse Search
69 AD 95 95 Browse Search
59 BC 90 90 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

Found 2 total hits in 2 results.

of the relations and connections of Sejanus whom Tiberius did not put to death; and Tacitus is disposed to believe the report, that Lentulus sent to the emperor to assure him of his allegiance, as long as he was allowed to retain the command of the army, but intimating that he would raise the standard of revolt, if he were deprived of his province. Tiberius thought it more prudent to leave him alone; but Caligula, thinking his influence with the soldiers too dangerous, put hint to death in A. D. 39, apparently without exciting any commotion. Lentulus was succeeded in the command of the army in Upper Germany by Galba, who was subsequently emperor. (Vell. 2.116; Tac. Ann. 4.42, 46, 6.30 ; D. C. 59.22; Suet. Galb. 6, Claud. 9) Lentulus Gaetulicus was an historian and a poet. Of his historical writings, which are quoted by Suetonius (Calig. 8), no fragments even are extant; and of his poems we have only three lines, which appear to have belonged to an astronomical poem, and which are pr
Lentulus 41. CN. CORNELIUS COSSI F. CN. N. LENTULUS GAETULICUS. a son of No. 39, was consul A. D. 26, with C. Calvisius Sabinus. He afterwards had the command of the legions of Upper Germany for ten years, and was very popular among the troops, by the mildness of his punishments and his merciful rule. He was also a favourite with the army in Lower Germany, which was commanded by L. Apronius, his father-in-law. His influence with the soldiers is said to have saved him on the fall of Sejanus, to whose son he had promised his daughter. He was the only one of the relations and connections of Sejanus whom Tiberius did not put to death; and Tacitus is disposed to believe the report, that Lentulus sent to the emperor to assure him of his allegiance, as long as he was allowed to retain the command of the army, but intimating that he would raise the standard of revolt, if he were deprived of his province. Tiberius thought it more prudent to leave him alone; but Caligula, thinking his influence