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Le'pidus 15. M'. Aemilius Mam. F. M. N. LEPIDUS, probably likewise a son of No. 8, was consul, B. C. 66, with L. Volcatius Tullus, the same year in which Cicero was praetor. He is mentioned several times by Cicero, but never attained much political importance. In B. C. 65, he is spoken of as one of the witnesses against C. Cornelius, whom Cicero defended. He belonged to the aristocratical party, but on the breaking out of the civil war in B. C. 49, he retired to his Formian villa to watch the progress of events. Here he was in almost daily intercourse with Cicero, from whose letters we learn that Lepidus was resolved not to cross the sea with Pompey, but to yield to Caesar if the latter was likely to be victorious. He eventually returned to Rome in March. (Sal. Cat. 18; Cic. in Cat. 1.6, pro Sull. 4; D. C. 36.25; Ascon. in Cornel. p. 66, ed. Orelli; Cic. Att. 7.12, 23, 8.1, 6, 9, 15, 9.1.)
Le'pidus 15. M'. Aemilius Mam. F. M. N. LEPIDUS, probably likewise a son of No. 8, was consul, B. C. 66, with L. Volcatius Tullus, the same year in which Cicero was praetor. He is mentioned several times by Cicero, but never attained much political importance. In B. C. 65, he is spoken of as one of the witnesses against C. Cornelius, whom Cicero defended. He belonged to the aristocratical party, but on the breaking out of the civil war in B. C. 49, he retired to his Formian villa to watch the progress of events. Here he was in almost daily intercourse with Cicero, from whose letters we learn that Lepidus was resolved not to cross the sea with Pompey, but to yield to Caesar if the latter was likely to be victorious. He eventually returned to Rome in March. (Sal. Cat. 18; Cic. in Cat. 1.6, pro Sull. 4; D. C. 36.25; Ascon. in Cornel. p. 66, ed. Orelli; Cic. Att. 7.12, 23, 8.1, 6, 9, 15, 9.1.)
Le'pidus 15. M'. Aemilius Mam. F. M. N. LEPIDUS, probably likewise a son of No. 8, was consul, B. C. 66, with L. Volcatius Tullus, the same year in which Cicero was praetor. He is mentioned several times by Cicero, but never attained much political importance. In B. C. 65, he is spoken of as one of the witnesses against C. Cornelius, whom Cicero defended. He belonged to the aristocratical party, but on the breaking out of the civil war in B. C. 49, he retired to his Formian villa to watch the progress of events. Here he was in almost daily intercourse with Cicero, from whose letters we learn that Lepidus was resolved not to cross the sea with Pompey, but to yield to Caesar if the latter was likely to be victorious. He eventually returned to Rome in March. (Sal. Cat. 18; Cic. in Cat. 1.6, pro Sull. 4; D. C. 36.25; Ascon. in Cornel. p. 66, ed. Orelli; Cic. Att. 7.12, 23, 8.1, 6, 9, 15, 9.1.)