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s, because he had been preferred to her sons as the husband of Julia, the daughter of Augustus. (D. C. 53.33.) But for this there seems little ground. The opportune death both of C. Caesar and L. Caesar seems much more suspicious. These young men were the children of Julia by her marriage with Agrippa; and being the grandchildren of Augustus, they presented, as long as they lived, an insuperable obstacle to the accession of Tiberius, the son of Livia. But Lucius died suddenly at Massilia in A. D. 2, and Caius in Lycia A. D. 4, of a wound, which was not considered at all dangerous. It was generally suspected that they had both been poisoned, by the secret orders of Livia and Tiberius. She was even suspected of having hastened the death of Augustus in A. D. 14. Augustus left Livia and Tiberius as his heirs ; and by his testament adopted her into the Julia gens, in consequence of which she received the name of Julia Augusta. By the accession of her son to the imperial throne, Livia had
Li'via 2. Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, was the daughterof Livius Drusus Claudianus [DRUSUS, No. 7], who had been adopted by one of the Livia gens, but was a descendant of App. Claudius Caecus. Livia was born on the 28th of September, B. C. 56-54. (Letronne, Recherches pour servir à l'Histoire de l'Egypte, p. 171.) She was married first to Tib. Claudius Nero; but her beauty having attracted the notice of Octavian at the beginning of B. C. 38, her husband was compelled to divorce her, and surrender her to the triumvir. She had already borne her husband one son, the future emperor Tiberius, and at the time of her marriage with Augustus was six months pregnant with another, who subsequently received the name of Drusus. It was only two years previously that she had been obliged to fly before Octavian, in consequence of her husband having fought against him in the Perusinian war. (Suet. Tib. 3, 4; Vell. 2.75, 79; Suet. Aug. 62; D. C. 48.15, 34, 44.) Livia never bore Augustus any
rred to her sons as the husband of Julia, the daughter of Augustus. (D. C. 53.33.) But for this there seems little ground. The opportune death both of C. Caesar and L. Caesar seems much more suspicious. These young men were the children of Julia by her marriage with Agrippa; and being the grandchildren of Augustus, they presented, as long as they lived, an insuperable obstacle to the accession of Tiberius, the son of Livia. But Lucius died suddenly at Massilia in A. D. 2, and Caius in Lycia A. D. 4, of a wound, which was not considered at all dangerous. It was generally suspected that they had both been poisoned, by the secret orders of Livia and Tiberius. She was even suspected of having hastened the death of Augustus in A. D. 14. Augustus left Livia and Tiberius as his heirs ; and by his testament adopted her into the Julia gens, in consequence of which she received the name of Julia Augusta. By the accession of her son to the imperial throne, Livia had now attained the long-cheri
Li'via 2. Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, was the daughterof Livius Drusus Claudianus [DRUSUS, No. 7], who had been adopted by one of the Livia gens, but was a descendant of App. Claudius Caecus. Livia was born on the 28th of September, B. C. 56-54. (Letronne, Recherches pour servir à l'Histoire de l'Egypte, p. 171.) She was married first to Tib. Claudius Nero; but her beauty having attracted the notice of Octavian at the beginning of B. C. 38, her husband was compelled to divorce her, and surrender her to the triumvir. She had already borne her husband one son, the future emperor Tiberius, and at the time of her marriage with Augustus was six months pregnant with another, who subsequently received the name of Drusus. It was only two years previously that she had been obliged to fly before Octavian, in consequence of her husband having fought against him in the Perusinian war. (Suet. Tib. 3, 4; Vell. 2.75, 79; Suet. Aug. 62; D. C. 48.15, 34, 44.) Livia never bore Augustus any
of Julia by her marriage with Agrippa; and being the grandchildren of Augustus, they presented, as long as they lived, an insuperable obstacle to the accession of Tiberius, the son of Livia. But Lucius died suddenly at Massilia in A. D. 2, and Caius in Lycia A. D. 4, of a wound, which was not considered at all dangerous. It was generally suspected that they had both been poisoned, by the secret orders of Livia and Tiberius. She was even suspected of having hastened the death of Augustus in A. D. 14. Augustus left Livia and Tiberius as his heirs ; and by his testament adopted her into the Julia gens, in consequence of which she received the name of Julia Augusta. By the accession of her son to the imperial throne, Livia had now attained the long-cherished object of her ambition, and by means of her son thought to reign over the Roman world. But this the jealous temper of Tiberius would not brook. At first all public documents were signed by her as well as by Tiberius, and letters on
Li'via 2. Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, was the daughterof Livius Drusus Claudianus [DRUSUS, No. 7], who had been adopted by one of the Livia gens, but was a descendant of App. Claudius Caecus. Livia was born on the 28th of September, B. C. 56-54. (Letronne, Recherches pour servir à l'Histoire de l'Egypte, p. 171.) She was married first to Tib. Claudius Nero; but her beauty having attracted the notice of Octavian at the beginning of B. C. 38, her husband was compelled to divorce her, and surrender her to the triumvir. She had already borne her husband one son, the future emperor Tiberius, and at the time of her marriage with Augustus was six months pregnant with another, who subsequently received the name of Drusus. It was only two years previously that she had been obliged to fly before Octavian, in consequence of her husband having fought against him in the Perusinian war. (Suet. Tib. 3, 4; Vell. 2.75, 79; Suet. Aug. 62; D. C. 48.15, 34, 44.) Livia never bore Augustus any