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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

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Ma'rius 12. SEX. MAIRIUS, a man of immense wealth, who possessed gold mines in Spain, and lived in the reign of Tiberius. He is called by Tacitus Hispaniarum ditissimus. After escaping an accusation in A. D. 25, which Calpurnius Salvianus wished to bring against him, he was condemned to death in A. D. 33, and thrown down the Tarpeian rock, on the pretext of his having committed incest with his daughter, but in reality because the emperor coveted his riches (Tac. Ann. 4.36, 6.19). Dio Cassius, who says that Marius was a friend of Tiberius, and that he was indebted to the emperor for his wealth, gives a different reason for the condemnation of Marius; he relates that the charge of incest was brought against Marius, because he wished to conceal his daughter from the lust of his imperial master. (D. C. 58.22.)
Ma'rius 12. SEX. MAIRIUS, a man of immense wealth, who possessed gold mines in Spain, and lived in the reign of Tiberius. He is called by Tacitus Hispaniarum ditissimus. After escaping an accusation in A. D. 25, which Calpurnius Salvianus wished to bring against him, he was condemned to death in A. D. 33, and thrown down the Tarpeian rock, on the pretext of his having committed incest with his daughter, but in reality because the emperor coveted his riches (Tac. Ann. 4.36, 6.19). Dio Cassius, who says that Marius was a friend of Tiberius, and that he was indebted to the emperor for his wealth, gives a different reason for the condemnation of Marius; he relates that the charge of incest was brought against Marius, because he wished to conceal his daughter from the lust of his imperial master. (D. C. 58.22.)