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Sulpicius had the unpopular function of presiding at the quaestio peculatus (Cic. pro Muren. 20). Murena expended considerable sums on the public exhibitions (ludi Apollinares), which he had to superintend during his office. (Plin. Nat. 33.3; Cic. pro Muren. 18, 19.) After his praetorship (B. C. 64) he was propraetor of Gallia Cisalpina, where his brother Caius served under him, and he settled the disputes between debtor and creditor in a satisfactory and equitable way, as Cicero says. In B. C. 63 he was a candidate for the consulship, and was elected with D. Junius Silanus. Serv. Sulpicius, an unsuccessful candidate, instituted a prosecution against Murena for bribery (ambitus), and he was supported in the matter by M. Porcius Cato, Cn. Postumius, and Serv. Sulpicius the younger (Plut. Cat. Min. 21, Cic. 35, and the oration of Cicero for Murena). Murena was defended by Q. Hortensius, M. Tullius Cicero, who was then consul, and M. Licinius Crassus. The speech of Cicero, which is exta
and was one of ten commissioners who were sent out to settle affairs in the countries conquered by Lucullus. (Cic. Att. 13.6.) In B. C. 65, was praetor with Serv. Sulpicius, and had the jurisdictio, while Sulpicius had the unpopular function of presiding at the quaestio peculatus (Cic. pro Muren. 20). Murena expended considerable sums on the public exhibitions (ludi Apollinares), which he had to superintend during his office. (Plin. Nat. 33.3; Cic. pro Muren. 18, 19.) After his praetorship (B. C. 64) he was propraetor of Gallia Cisalpina, where his brother Caius served under him, and he settled the disputes between debtor and creditor in a satisfactory and equitable way, as Cicero says. In B. C. 63 he was a candidate for the consulship, and was elected with D. Junius Silanus. Serv. Sulpicius, an unsuccessful candidate, instituted a prosecution against Murena for bribery (ambitus), and he was supported in the matter by M. Porcius Cato, Cn. Postumius, and Serv. Sulpicius the younger (P
general in honourable feeling and conduct. Murena followed Tigranes in his retreat from Tigranocerta to the Taurus, and took all his baggage, and he was left to maintain the siege of Tigranocerta while Lucullus marched from before that city to check Tigranes, who was again in sight of Tigranocerta with a large army. He returned to Rome before the end of the war, and was one of ten commissioners who were sent out to settle affairs in the countries conquered by Lucullus. (Cic. Att. 13.6.) In B. C. 65, was praetor with Serv. Sulpicius, and had the jurisdictio, while Sulpicius had the unpopular function of presiding at the quaestio peculatus (Cic. pro Muren. 20). Murena expended considerable sums on the public exhibitions (ludi Apollinares), which he had to superintend during his office. (Plin. Nat. 33.3; Cic. pro Muren. 18, 19.) After his praetorship (B. C. 64) he was propraetor of Gallia Cisalpina, where his brother Caius served under him, and he settled the disputes between debtor and
Mure'na 5. L. Licinius Murena, the son of No. 4, served under his father (B. C. 83) in the war against Mithridates. He was quaestor at Rome with the jurist Serv. Sulpicius, who was afterwards his opponent in the canvas for the consulship. In his aedileship Murena adorned the walls of the Comitium with Lacedaemonian stone (Plin. Nat. 35.14). In the third Mithridatic war, which began B. C. 74, he served under L. Lucullus (Plut. Luc. 15, &c.), and was left by him to direct the siege of Amisus, while Lycullus advanced against Mithridates. At the captare of Amisus B. C. 71). Tyrannio was made prisoner, and he was given to Murena at his request, who thereupon made him free, by which act it was implied that he had been a slave. Plutarch (Plut. Luc. 19) blames Murena for his conduct in this matter, and adds that it was not in this instance only that Murena showed himself far inferior to his general in honourable feeling and conduct. Murena followed Tigranes in his retreat from Tigranocerta t
er (B. C. 83) in the war against Mithridates. He was quaestor at Rome with the jurist Serv. Sulpicius, who was afterwards his opponent in the canvas for the consulship. In his aedileship Murena adorned the walls of the Comitium with Lacedaemonian stone (Plin. Nat. 35.14). In the third Mithridatic war, which began B. C. 74, he served under L. Lucullus (Plut. Luc. 15, &c.), and was left by him to direct the siege of Amisus, while Lycullus advanced against Mithridates. At the captare of Amisus B. C. 71). Tyrannio was made prisoner, and he was given to Murena at his request, who thereupon made him free, by which act it was implied that he had been a slave. Plutarch (Plut. Luc. 19) blames Murena for his conduct in this matter, and adds that it was not in this instance only that Murena showed himself far inferior to his general in honourable feeling and conduct. Murena followed Tigranes in his retreat from Tigranocerta to the Taurus, and took all his baggage, and he was left to maintain the
Mure'na 5. L. Licinius Murena, the son of No. 4, served under his father (B. C. 83) in the war against Mithridates. He was quaestor at Rome with the jurist Serv. Sulpicius, who was afterwards his opponent in the canvas for the consulship. In his aedileship Murena adorned the walls of the Comitium with Lacedaemonian stone (Plin. Nat. 35.14). In the third Mithridatic war, which began B. C. 74, he served under L. Lucullus (Plut. Luc. 15, &c.), and was left by him to direct the siege of Amisus, while Lycullus advanced against Mithridates. At the captare of Amisus B. C. 71). Tyrannio was made prisoner, and he was given to Murena at his request, who thereupon made him free, by which act it was implied that he had been a slave. Plutarch (Plut. Luc. 19) blames Murena for his conduct in this matter, and adds that it was not in this instance only that Murena showed himself far inferior to his general in honourable feeling and conduct. Murena followed Tigranes in his retreat from Tigranocerta t