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te of the second Oppian in order to determine the date of Atheneaus. [ATHENAEUS]., or by considering the passage in question to be a spurious interpolation. It is also confirmed by Eusebius Chron. ap. S. Hieron. vol. viii. p. 722, ed. Veron. 1736) and Syncellus (Chronogr. pp. 352, 353, ed. Paris. 1652), who place Oppian in the year 171 (or 173), and by Suidas, who says he lived in the reign of "Marcus Antoninus," i. e. not Caracalla, as Kuster and others suppose, but M. Aurelius Antoninus, A. D. 161-180. If the date here assigned to Oppian be correct, the emperor to whom the "Halieutica" are dedicated, and who is called (1.3) gai/hs u(/paton kra/tus, *)Antwni=ne, will be M. Aurelius; the allusions to his son (1.66. 78, 2.683, 4.5, 5.45) will refer to Commodus; and the poem may be supposed to have been written after A. D. 177, which is the year when the latter was admitted to a participation of the imperial dignity. If the writer of the "Halieutica" be supposed to have lived under Cara
c. This passage, however, can hardly be fairly said to determine the point, for (as if to show the uncertainty of almost everything relating to Oppian) while Schneider considers that it proves that the poet was born at Corycus, Fabricius and others have adduced it as evidence to show that he was not. Respecting his date there has been equal difference of opinion. Athenaeus says (i. p. 13) he lived shortly before his own time, and Athenaeus flourished, according to Mr. Clinton (Fasti Rom. A. D. 194), about the end of the second century. This testimony may be considered as almost, conclusive with respect to Oppian's date, though it has been attempted to evade it, either by placing Athenaeus more than thirty years later * Fabricius, Schweighaeuser, and others, have first confounded the author of the "lalieutica" with the author of the "Cynegetica," and have then made use of the date of the second Oppian in order to determine the date of Atheneaus. [ATHENAEUS]., or by considering the pa
r 171 (or 173), and by Suidas, who says he lived in the reign of "Marcus Antoninus," i. e. not Caracalla, as Kuster and others suppose, but M. Aurelius Antoninus, A. D. 161-180. If the date here assigned to Oppian be correct, the emperor to whom the "Halieutica" are dedicated, and who is called (1.3) gai/hs u(/paton kra/tus, *)Antwni=ne, will be M. Aurelius; the allusions to his son (1.66. 78, 2.683, 4.5, 5.45) will refer to Commodus; and the poem may be supposed to have been written after A. D. 177, which is the year when the latter was admitted to a participation of the imperial dignity. If the writer of the "Halieutica" be supposed to have lived under Caracalla, the name "Antoninus" will certainly suit that emperor perfectly well, as the appellation "Aurelius Antoninus" was conferred upon him when he was appointed Caesar by his father, A. D. 196. (Clinton's Fasti Rom.) But if we examine the other passages above referred to, the difficulty of applying theme to Caracalla will be at o
hs into u(mete/rhs; but these emendations, which are purely conjectural, have not been received into the text by any one but the proposer. The author addresses his poem to the emperor Caracalla, whom he calls (1.3) *)Antwni=ne, to\n mega/lh mega/lw| fitu/sato *Du/mna *Sebh/rw|: and the tenth and eleventh lines have been brought forward as a presumptive evidence that he wrote it after Caracalla had been associated with his father in the empire, A. D. 198, and before the death of the latter, A. D. 211. The "Cynegetica" consist of about 2100 hexameter lines, divided into four books. The last of these is inmperfect, and perhaps a fifth book may also have been lost, as the anonymous author of the Life of Oppian says the poem consisted of; hat number of books, though Suidas mentions only four. There is probably an allusion in this poem to the "Halieutica" (1.77-80), which has been thought to imply that both poems were written by the same person; but this is not the necessary explanation o
ius; the allusions to his son (1.66. 78, 2.683, 4.5, 5.45) will refer to Commodus; and the poem may be supposed to have been written after A. D. 177, which is the year when the latter was admitted to a participation of the imperial dignity. If the writer of the "Halieutica" be supposed to have lived under Caracalla, the name "Antoninus" will certainly suit that emperor perfectly well, as the appellation "Aurelius Antoninus" was conferred upon him when he was appointed Caesar by his father, A. D. 196. (Clinton's Fasti Rom.) But if we examine the other passages above referred to, the difficulty of applying theme to Caracalla will be at once apparent, as that emperor (as far as we learn from history) had no son, --though some persons have even gone so far as to conjecture that he must have had one, because Oppian alludes to hint ! (Schneider's first ed. p. 346.) The "Halieutica" consist of about 3500 hexameter lines, divided into five books, of which the first two treat of the natural
he second Oppian in order to determine the date of Atheneaus. [ATHENAEUS]., or by considering the passage in question to be a spurious interpolation. It is also confirmed by Eusebius Chron. ap. S. Hieron. vol. viii. p. 722, ed. Veron. 1736) and Syncellus (Chronogr. pp. 352, 353, ed. Paris. 1652), who place Oppian in the year 171 (or 173), and by Suidas, who says he lived in the reign of "Marcus Antoninus," i. e. not Caracalla, as Kuster and others suppose, but M. Aurelius Antoninus, A. D. 161-180. If the date here assigned to Oppian be correct, the emperor to whom the "Halieutica" are dedicated, and who is called (1.3) gai/hs u(/paton kra/tus, *)Antwni=ne, will be M. Aurelius; the allusions to his son (1.66. 78, 2.683, 4.5, 5.45) will refer to Commodus; and the poem may be supposed to have been written after A. D. 177, which is the year when the latter was admitted to a participation of the imperial dignity. If the writer of the "Halieutica" be supposed to have lived under Caracalla,
s)mh/n into e)/bh, and, in the latter, h/mete/rhs into u(mete/rhs; but these emendations, which are purely conjectural, have not been received into the text by any one but the proposer. The author addresses his poem to the emperor Caracalla, whom he calls (1.3) *)Antwni=ne, to\n mega/lh mega/lw| fitu/sato *Du/mna *Sebh/rw|: and the tenth and eleventh lines have been brought forward as a presumptive evidence that he wrote it after Caracalla had been associated with his father in the empire, A. D. 198, and before the death of the latter, A. D. 211. The "Cynegetica" consist of about 2100 hexameter lines, divided into four books. The last of these is inmperfect, and perhaps a fifth book may also have been lost, as the anonymous author of the Life of Oppian says the poem consisted of; hat number of books, though Suidas mentions only four. There is probably an allusion in this poem to the "Halieutica" (1.77-80), which has been thought to imply that both poems were written by the same pers