hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
43 BC 170 170 Browse Search
44 BC 146 146 Browse Search
49 BC 140 140 Browse Search
45 BC 124 124 Browse Search
54 BC 121 121 Browse Search
46 BC 119 119 Browse Search
63 BC 109 109 Browse Search
48 BC 106 106 Browse Search
69 AD 95 95 Browse Search
59 BC 90 90 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

Found 2 total hits in 2 results.

t long; Demetrius was the first to turn his arms against Philip, but the latter was supported not only by Straton tyrant of Beraea, but by a large Parthian army under a general named Mithridates, who blockaded Demetrius in his camp, and ultimately took him prisoner. After this Philippus made himself master of Antioch, and became for a short time sole ruler of Syria, probably in the year B. C. 88. But the civil war was soon renewed by his remaining brother Antiochus XII., who made himself master of Damascus and Coele-Syria, of which Philip was unable to dispossess him. (J. AJ 13.13.4, 14.3, 15.1; Euseb. Arm. p. 169.) The subsequent fortunes of the latter are wholly unknown but it seems certain that he was dethroned, and probably also put to death by Tigranes, king of Armenia, when that monarch established himself on the throne of Syria, B. C. 83. (Trog. Pomp. Prol. xl.; Euseb. Arm. p. 170; Eckhel. vol. iii. p. 244; Froelich. Ann. Syr. p. 114 ; Clinton, F. H. vol. iii. p. 339 [E.H.B]
of the whole of Syria, which they appear to have divided between them. Their concord, however, did not last long; Demetrius was the first to turn his arms against Philip, but the latter was supported not only by Straton tyrant of Beraea, but by a large Parthian army under a general named Mithridates, who blockaded Demetrius in his camp, and ultimately took him prisoner. After this Philippus made himself master of Antioch, and became for a short time sole ruler of Syria, probably in the year B. C. 88. But the civil war was soon renewed by his remaining brother Antiochus XII., who made himself master of Damascus and Coele-Syria, of which Philip was unable to dispossess him. (J. AJ 13.13.4, 14.3, 15.1; Euseb. Arm. p. 169.) The subsequent fortunes of the latter are wholly unknown but it seems certain that he was dethroned, and probably also put to death by Tigranes, king of Armenia, when that monarch established himself on the throne of Syria, B. C. 83. (Trog. Pomp. Prol. xl.; Euseb. Arm.