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Ptolemaeus or Ptolemaeus Ceraunus (*Ptolemai=os), surnamed CERAUNUS, king of Macedonia, was the son of Ptolemy I. king of Egypt, by his second wife Eurvdice. The period of his birth is not mentioned ; but if Droysen is right in assigning the marriage of Eurydice with Ptolemy to the year B. C. 321 (see Hellenism. vol. i. p. 154), their son cannot have been born till B. C. 320. He must, at all events, have been above thirty years old in B. C. 285, when the aged king of Egypt cane to the resolution of setting aside his claim to the throne, and appointing his younger son, Ptolemy Philadelphus, his successor. (Appian. Syr. 62 ; Julstin. 16.2.) To this step we are told that the old king was led not only by his warm attachment to his wife Berenice and her son Philadelphus, but by apprehensions of the violent and passionate character of his eldest son, which subsequent events proved to be but too well founded. Ptolemy Ceraunus quitted the court of Egypt in disgust, and repaired to that of Ly
Ptolemaeus or Ptolemaeus Ceraunus (*Ptolemai=os), surnamed CERAUNUS, king of Macedonia, was the son of Ptolemy I. king of Egypt, by his second wife Eurvdice. The period of his birth is not mentioned ; but if Droysen is right in assigning the marriage of Eurydice with Ptolemy to the year B. C. 321 (see Hellenism. vol. i. p. 154), their son cannot have been born till B. C. 320. He must, at all events, have been above thirty years old in B. C. 285, when the aged king of Egypt cane to the resolution of setting aside his claim to the throne, and appointing his younger son, Ptolemy Philadelphus, his successor. (Appian. Syr. 62 ; Julstin. 16.2.) To this step we are told that the old king was led not only by his warm attachment to his wife Berenice and her son Philadelphus, but by apprehensions of the violent and passionate character of his eldest son, which subsequent events proved to be but too well founded. Ptolemy Ceraunus quitted the court of Egypt in disgust, and repaired to that of Ly
yal birth. Seleucus, we are told, even held out hopes to him of establishing him on the throne of Egypt, when Ptolemy, probably deeming the crown of Macedonia to be more easily within his grasp, basely assassinated his new patron at Lysimachia, B. C. 280, and immediately assumed the diadem himself. (Appian. Syr. 62; Memnon. 100.12; Just. 17.2; Paus. 1.16.2; Euseb. Arm. p. 157.) His authority appears to have been acknowledged without opposition by the army, and this enabled him to make himselfy. (Just. 24.3-5; Paus. 10.19.7; Memnon. 100.14 ; Diod. xxii. Exc. Hoeschel. p. 495, Exc. Vales. p. 592; Dexippus apud Syncell. p. 266; Plb. 9.35.4.) Concerning the chronology of these events, sec Clinton (F. H. vol. ii. pp. 237, 238). It seems certain that the death of Ptolemy must have taken place before the end of B. C. 280. and that the period of seventeen months assigned to his reign by Dexippus (I. c.) must be reckoned from the death of Lysimachus, and not from that of Seleucus. [E.H.B]
Ptolemaeus or Ptolemaeus Ceraunus (*Ptolemai=os), surnamed CERAUNUS, king of Macedonia, was the son of Ptolemy I. king of Egypt, by his second wife Eurvdice. The period of his birth is not mentioned ; but if Droysen is right in assigning the marriage of Eurydice with Ptolemy to the year B. C. 321 (see Hellenism. vol. i. p. 154), their son cannot have been born till B. C. 320. He must, at all events, have been above thirty years old in B. C. 285, when the aged king of Egypt cane to the resolution of setting aside his claim to the throne, and appointing his younger son, Ptolemy Philadelphus, his successor. (Appian. Syr. 62 ; Julstin. 16.2.) To this step we are told that the old king was led not only by his warm attachment to his wife Berenice and her son Philadelphus, but by apprehensions of the violent and passionate character of his eldest son, which subsequent events proved to be but too well founded. Ptolemy Ceraunus quitted the court of Egypt in disgust, and repaired to that of Ly