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express a thought with the greatest effect, the orator by his eloquence, or the actor by his gestures. Macrobius, who relates this anecdote, goes on to say that these exercises gave Roscius so high an opinion of his art, that he wrote a work in which he compared eloquence and acting. Like Aesopus, Roscius realized an immense fortune by his profession. Macrobius says that he made a thousand denarii a day, and Pliny relates that his yearly profits were fifty millions of sesterces. He died in B. C. 62, as Cicero, in his oration for Archias (100.8), which was delivered in that year, speaks of his death as a recent event. (Cic. de Div. 1.36, 2.31, de Orat. 1.27-29, 59, 60, 2.57, 59, 3.26, 59, de Leg. 1.4, Brut. 84; Plut. Cie. 5 ; Macr. 2.10; V. Max. 8.7.7; Plin. Nat. 7.39. s. 40.) A scholiast on Cicero gives the cognomen Gallus to Q. Roscius, but it does not occur elsewhere, as far as we know. (Schol. Bob. pro Arch. p. 357, ed. Orelli.) In B. C. 68 Cicero pleaded the cause of his friend
fifty millions of sesterces. He died in B. C. 62, as Cicero, in his oration for Archias (100.8), which was delivered in that year, speaks of his death as a recent event. (Cic. de Div. 1.36, 2.31, de Orat. 1.27-29, 59, 60, 2.57, 59, 3.26, 59, de Leg. 1.4, Brut. 84; Plut. Cie. 5 ; Macr. 2.10; V. Max. 8.7.7; Plin. Nat. 7.39. s. 40.) A scholiast on Cicero gives the cognomen Gallus to Q. Roscius, but it does not occur elsewhere, as far as we know. (Schol. Bob. pro Arch. p. 357, ed. Orelli.) In B. C. 68 Cicero pleaded the cause of his friend in a civil suit before the judex C. Piso. It appears that a certain C. Fannius Chaerea had a slave of the name of Panurgus, whom he entrusted to Roscius for instruction in his art, on the agreement that whatever profits the slave might acquire should be divided between them. Panurgus was murdered by one Q. Flavius of Tarquinii, and accordingly an action was brought against him for damages, by Fannius and Roscius. Before the case came on for trial, Rosc