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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

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1. P. Sittius, of Nuceria in Campania, was one of the adventurers, bankrupt in character and fortune, but possessing considerable ability, who abounded in Rome during the latter years of the republic. He was connected with Catiline, and went to Spain in B. C. 64, from which country he crossed over into Mauritania in the following year. It was said that P. Sulla had sent him into Spain to excite an insurrection against the Roman government; and Cicero accordingly, when he defended Sulla, in B. C. 62, was obliged also to undertake the defence of his friend Sittius, and to deny the truth of the charges that had been brought against him. The orator represented Sittius as his own friend, and pointed out how his father had remained true to the Romans during the Marsic war. (Cic. pro Sull. 20.) Sittius, however, did not return to Rome. His property in Italy was sold to pay his debts, and he continued in Africa, where he fought with great success in the wars of the kings of the country, selli
Si'ttius or SI'TIUS. 1. P. Sittius, of Nuceria in Campania, was one of the adventurers, bankrupt in character and fortune, but possessing considerable ability, who abounded in Rome during the latter years of the republic. He was connected with Catiline, and went to Spain in B. C. 64, from which country he crossed over into Mauritania in the following year. It was said that P. Sulla had sent him into Spain to excite an insurrection against the Roman government; and Cicero accordingly, when he defended Sulla, in B. C. 62, was obliged also to undertake the defence of his friend Sittius, and to deny the truth of the charges that had been brought against him. The orator represented Sittius as his own friend, and pointed out how his father had remained true to the Romans during the Marsic war. (Cic. pro Sull. 20.) Sittius, however, did not return to Rome. His property in Italy was sold to pay his debts, and he continued in Africa, where he fought with great success in the wars of the king
friend, and pointed out how his father had remained true to the Romans during the Marsic war. (Cic. pro Sull. 20.) Sittius, however, did not return to Rome. His property in Italy was sold to pay his debts, and he continued in Africa, where he fought with great success in the wars of the kings of the country, selling his services first to one prince and then to another. The reputation he had acquired gradually attracted troops to his standard; and at the time that Caesar landed in Africa, in B. C. 46, he was at the head of a considerable force both by land and by sea. Although Sittius had not previously had any connection with Caesar, he resolved to espouse his cause, foreseeing that Caesar would be victorious in Africa as elsewhere, and that he himself would be liberally rewarded for his services. Sittius came to the assistance of Caesar at the time when his aid was most needed, for he had landed in Africa with only a small number of his troops, and ran the risk of being overwhelmed by