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o (squint-eyed) is originally Greek, though it was also used by the Romans, and applied as a cognomen, among others, to the father of Pompeius Magnus. How the geographer got this name we are not informed. Groskurd infers that Strabo died about A. D. 24 Strabo (lib. xii. p. 576) says that Cyzicus was still a free state; but in A. D. 25, Cyzicus lost its privilege as a Libera Civitas (amisere libertatem ; Tac. Ann. 4.36; D. C. 54.7). Accordingly, Groskurd concludes that Strabo was dead in A. D. . 25. In the seventeenth and last book (p. 828, &c.) he mentions the death of Juba II. as a recent occurrence, and he also mentions the fact of Juba being succeeded by his son Ptolemaeus. Juba died in A. D. 21. The conclusion that Strabo died in A. D. 24 is unsupported by any evidence. We only know that he died after A. D. 21. Groskurd's reckoning makes Strabo attain the age of near ninety. In fact he may have lived after A. D. 25, and may have been more than ninety when he died; but as the year
oskurd infers that Strabo died about A. D. 24 Strabo (lib. xii. p. 576) says that Cyzicus was still a free state; but in A. D. 25, Cyzicus lost its privilege as a Libera Civitas (amisere libertatem ; Tac. Ann. 4.36; D. C. 54.7). Accordingly, Groskurd concludes that Strabo was dead in A. D. 25; but this is not a necessary conclusion. We can only conclude that the passage about Cyzicus was written before A. D. 25. In the seventeenth and last book (p. 828, &c.) he mentions the death of Juba II. as A. D. 25. In the seventeenth and last book (p. 828, &c.) he mentions the death of Juba II. as a recent occurrence, and he also mentions the fact of Juba being succeeded by his son Ptolemaeus. Juba died in A. D. 21. The conclusion that Strabo died in A. D. 24 is unsupported by any evidence. We only know that he died after A. D. 21. Groskurd's reckoning makes Strabo attain the age of near ninety. In fact he may have lived after A. D. 25, and may have been more than ninety when he died; but as the year of his birth is unknown, we cannot fix the limit of his age. As to the time at which he
us as still living. Germanicus died in Syria in A. D. 20 (19); and Groskurd concludes that the sixth book was written in A. D. 19. The true conclusion is that this passage was written before A. D. 19. It has been shown that Strabo was writing after AA. D. 19. It has been shown that Strabo was writing after A. D. 19, and yet the passage at the end of the sixth book stands as he wrote it, though Germanicus was dead when he wrote the passage about Juba II. in the seventeenth book. This shows that the inference from particular passages should be the strict A. D. 19, and yet the passage at the end of the sixth book stands as he wrote it, though Germanicus was dead when he wrote the passage about Juba II. in the seventeenth book. This shows that the inference from particular passages should be the strict logical inference and no more. A passage in the fourth book (p. 206) certainly was written in A. D. 19, for Strabo there states that the Carni and Taurisci had quietly paid tribute for thirty-three years; and both these tribes were reduced to subjectA. D. 19, for Strabo there states that the Carni and Taurisci had quietly paid tribute for thirty-three years; and both these tribes were reduced to subjection by Tiberius and Drusus in B. C. 14. Groskurd concludes thus : " if Strabo wrote his fourth book in his eighty-fifth year, and if we allow him two years for the composition of the first three books, he will have commenced his work in the eighty-th
e end of the sixth book stands as he wrote it, though Germanicus was dead when he wrote the passage about Juba II. in the seventeenth book. This shows that the inference from particular passages should be the strict logical inference and no more. A passage in the fourth book (p. 206) certainly was written in A. D. 19, for Strabo there states that the Carni and Taurisci had quietly paid tribute for thirty-three years; and both these tribes were reduced to subjection by Tiberius and Drusus in B. C. 14. Groskurd concludes thus : " if Strabo wrote his fourth book in his eighty-fifth year, and if we allow him two years for the composition of the first three books, he will have commenced his work in the eighty-third year of his age; and since he finished it in his eighty-eighth or ninth year, we may allow for the composition of the whole work six or seven years." This conclusion as to the age when Strabo began his work depends on the date of his birth, which is unknown; and the conclusion as
passage about Cyzicus was written before A. D. 25. In the seventeenth and last book (p. 828, &c.) he mentions the death of Juba II. as a recent occurrence, and he also mentions the fact of Juba being succeeded by his son Ptolemaeus. Juba died in A. D. 21. The conclusion that Strabo died in A. D. 24 is unsupported by any evidence. We only know that he died after A. D. 21. Groskurd's reckoning makes Strabo attain the age of near ninety. In fact he may have lived after A. D. 25, and may have been mA. D. 21. Groskurd's reckoning makes Strabo attain the age of near ninety. In fact he may have lived after A. D. 25, and may have been more than ninety when he died; but as the year of his birth is unknown, we cannot fix the limit of his age. As to the time at which he wrote his work, we know nothing more than can be collected from particular passages, and we cannot with certainty infer from a particular passage in a book being written after a given time, that the whole book was written after such time; but Groskurd does make such inferences. At the close of the sixth book (p. 288) Strabo speaks of Caesar Germanicus as still l
has confounded him with the son P. Servilius Casca, who was also called Isauricus. But it is clear that Strabo means to say that he saw the Isauricus who got his name from the conquest of the Isaurians. The assumed date, B. C. 66, for the birth of Strabo, is too early. He was certainly writing as late as A. D. 18; and perhaps we may with Clinton place his birth not later than B. C. 54. But Strabo was a pupil of Tyrannio the grammarian (p. 548), and Tyrannio was made prisoner by Lucullus in B. C. 71, and carried to Rome, probably not later than B. C. 66, and perhaps earlier. Strabo therefore was a hearer of Tyrannio at Rome. The name Strabo (squint-eyed) is originally Greek, though it was also used by the Romans, and applied as a cognomen, among others, to the father of Pompeius Magnus. How the geographer got this name we are not informed. Groskurd infers that Strabo died about A. D. 24 Strabo (lib. xii. p. 576) says that Cyzicus was still a free state; but in A. D. 25, Cyzicus los
ne (p. 816). It is assumed that he must have been a man of mature years when he first visited Rome, but there is nothing which justifies the conjecture of making him eight and thirty at the time of this visit, in order to establish B. C. 66 as the year of his birth. A passage in which Strabo says (p. 568) that he saw P. Servilius Isauricus, has given rise to some discussion. This Servilius defeated the Isauri. whence he got the name Isauricus, between B. C. 77 and 75; and he died at Rome in B. C. 44, at the age of ninety. If Strabo saw this Isauricus, when did he see him ? As the question cannot be satisfactorily answered, it has been assumed that Strabo confounded Isauricus with some other distinguished Roman whom he saw in Asia in his youth, or that he has confounded him with the son P. Servilius Casca, who was also called Isauricus. But it is clear that Strabo means to say that he saw the Isauricus who got his name from the conquest of the Isaurians. The assumed date, B. C. 66, for
wn personal observation. Eratosthenes, Artemidorus, Ephorus, Fabius Pictor, Caecilius, the Sicilian, and an anonymous chorographer are his main written authorities for the description of Italy. The anonymous chorographer is supposed to be a Roman, because he gives distances in Roman miles and not in Greek stadia. Some critics have conjectured that this chorographer is M. Vipsanius Agrippa, but this work of Agrippa, says Groskurd, was not completed and published until after his death, and in B. C. 12, and consequently much too late for Strabo to have made use of it between B. C. 29 and 26, at Rome. The translator here assumes that he has fixed Strabo's residence at Rome during this period, whereas it cannot be proved, and if it could, the argument would not even then be conclusive. It is a better objection to the supposition of this chorographer being Agrippa, "that Strabo made use of this work only for Italy, perhaps also southern Gaul, and for no other country, and yet it extended ove
im ? As the question cannot be satisfactorily answered, it has been assumed that Strabo confounded Isauricus with some other distinguished Roman whom he saw in Asia in his youth, or that he has confounded him with the son P. Servilius Casca, who was also called Isauricus. But it is clear that Strabo means to say that he saw the Isauricus who got his name from the conquest of the Isaurians. The assumed date, B. C. 66, for the birth of Strabo, is too early. He was certainly writing as late as A. D. 18; and perhaps we may with Clinton place his birth not later than B. C. 54. But Strabo was a pupil of Tyrannio the grammarian (p. 548), and Tyrannio was made prisoner by Lucullus in B. C. 71, and carried to Rome, probably not later than B. C. 66, and perhaps earlier. Strabo therefore was a hearer of Tyrannio at Rome. The name Strabo (squint-eyed) is originally Greek, though it was also used by the Romans, and applied as a cognomen, among others, to the father of Pompeius Magnus. How the geo
us in Egypt, and travelled as far as Syene (p. 816). It is assumed that he must have been a man of mature years when he first visited Rome, but there is nothing which justifies the conjecture of making him eight and thirty at the time of this visit, in order to establish B. C. 66 as the year of his birth. A passage in which Strabo says (p. 568) that he saw P. Servilius Isauricus, has given rise to some discussion. This Servilius defeated the Isauri. whence he got the name Isauricus, between B. C. 77 and 75; and he died at Rome in B. C. 44, at the age of ninety. If Strabo saw this Isauricus, when did he see him ? As the question cannot be satisfactorily answered, it has been assumed that Strabo confounded Isauricus with some other distinguished Roman whom he saw in Asia in his youth, or that he has confounded him with the son P. Servilius Casca, who was also called Isauricus. But it is clear that Strabo means to say that he saw the Isauricus who got his name from the conquest of the Isa
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