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name, but calls him sometimes Abú Jafar Ibnu-l-Jezzár, sometimes Ahmed Ibn Ibrahím Ibn Abí Cháled ; which has led Lambecius and Bandini, in their excellent catalogues, to state that the original work " partim ab Epro filio Zaphar nepote Elgzezar, partim autem ab Achmede filio Abrami, nepote Chaletis medici, primum fuit compositum." Ibnu-l-Jezzár was a pupil of Ishak Ibn Soleiman Al-Isráílí (commonly called Isaac Judaeus), and lived at Kairowán in Africa. He died at a great age, A. H. 395 (A. D. 100 4/5). He was a man of considerable eminence, and wrote several works on medicine, metaphysics, history &c., some of which are extant in MS. in different European libraries. The only one of these with which we are here concerned is entitled Zádu-l-Musáfer, " Viaticum Peregrinautium," and consists of seven books. There is an incomplete Arabic MS. of this work in the Bodleian Library at Oxford (Hunt. 302), which the Writer has examined partially throughout, more especially the part corr
h=tis or *Prwtashkrh/ths, that is, Protosecretarius, a word whose meaning may be found in the glossaries of Du Cange and Meursius, and which, in the case of Censtantinus, has occasioned his being somctimes called (by a curious series of errors) " Asyncritus " and " Asynkitus." (See Lambec. loco cit. p. 295.) At last he became a monk in the Monastery of Cassino, A. D. 1072, where he employed part of his time in writing and translating various medical works, and where he died at a great age, A. D. 1087. It is not necessary to mention here all his numerous works, a list of which may be found in Fabricius, Bibl. Gr. vol. xiii. p. 124, ed. vet., and in Choulant's Handb. der Bücherkunde für die Aeltere Medicin. They were collected and published in 2 vols. fol. Basil. 1536, 1539. The only one of his writings with which we are at present concerned is that which consists of seven books, and is entitled, "De omnium Morborum, qui Homini accidere possunt, Cognitione et Curatione," or in some o
the Duke Robert Guiscard, and whence he is sometimes called in Greek MSS. *Kwnst. o( *(Rhgi=nos. Hence also his title of *Prwtashkrh=tis or *Prwtashkrh/ths, that is, Protosecretarius, a word whose meaning may be found in the glossaries of Du Cange and Meursius, and which, in the case of Censtantinus, has occasioned his being somctimes called (by a curious series of errors) " Asyncritus " and " Asynkitus." (See Lambec. loco cit. p. 295.) At last he became a monk in the Monastery of Cassino, A. D. 1072, where he employed part of his time in writing and translating various medical works, and where he died at a great age, A. D. 1087. It is not necessary to mention here all his numerous works, a list of which may be found in Fabricius, Bibl. Gr. vol. xiii. p. 124, ed. vet., and in Choulant's Handb. der Bücherkunde für die Aeltere Medicin. They were collected and published in 2 vols. fol. Basil. 1536, 1539. The only one of his writings with which we are at present concerned is that which