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Virgi'lius 2. C. Virgilius, was praeter B. C. 62, and had Q. Cicero, the brother of the orator, as one of his colleagues. In the following year, B. C. 61, he governed Sicily as propraetor, where P. Clodius served under him as quaestor. He was still in Sicily in B. C. 58, when Cicero was banished; and notwithstanding his friendship with Cicero, and his having been a colleague of his brother in the praetorship, he refused to allow Cicero to seek refuge in his province. (Cic. pro Planc. 40, ad Q. Fr. 1.2.2; Schol. Bob. in Clod. p. 333, ed. Orelli; Plut. Cic. 32.) In the civil war Virgilius espoused the Pompeian party, and had the command of Thapsus, together with a fleet, in B. C. 46. After the battle of Thapsus, Virgilius at first refused to surrender the town; but when he saw that all resistance was hopeless, he subsequently surrendered the place to Caninius Rebilus, whom Caesar had left to besiege it. (Hirt. B. Afr. 28, 86, 93.)
Virgi'lius 2. C. Virgilius, was praeter B. C. 62, and had Q. Cicero, the brother of the orator, as one of his colleagues. In the following year, B. C. 61, he governed Sicily as propraetor, where P. Clodius served under him as quaestor. He was still in Sicily in B. C. 58, when Cicero was banished; and notwithstanding his friendship with Cicero, and his having been a colleague of his brother in the praetorship, he refused to allow Cicero to seek refuge in his province. (Cic. pro Planc. 40, ad Q. Fr. 1.2.2; Schol. Bob. in Clod. p. 333, ed. Orelli; Plut. Cic. 32.) In the civil war Virgilius espoused the Pompeian party, and had the command of Thapsus, together with a fleet, in B. C. 46. After the battle of Thapsus, Virgilius at first refused to surrender the town; but when he saw that all resistance was hopeless, he subsequently surrendered the place to Caninius Rebilus, whom Caesar had left to besiege it. (Hirt. B. Afr. 28, 86, 93.)
Virgi'lius 2. C. Virgilius, was praeter B. C. 62, and had Q. Cicero, the brother of the orator, as one of his colleagues. In the following year, B. C. 61, he governed Sicily as propraetor, where P. Clodius served under him as quaestor. He was still in Sicily in B. C. 58, when Cicero was banished; and notwithstanding his friendship with Cicero, and his having been a colleague of his brother in the praetorship, he refused to allow Cicero to seek refuge in his province. (Cic. pro Planc. 40, ad Q. Fr. 1.2.2; Schol. Bob. in Clod. p. 333, ed. Orelli; Plut. Cic. 32.) In the civil war Virgilius espoused the Pompeian party, and had the command of Thapsus, together with a fleet, in B. C. 46. After the battle of Thapsus, Virgilius at first refused to surrender the town; but when he saw that all resistance was hopeless, he subsequently surrendered the place to Caninius Rebilus, whom Caesar had left to besiege it. (Hirt. B. Afr. 28, 86, 93.)
Virgi'lius 2. C. Virgilius, was praeter B. C. 62, and had Q. Cicero, the brother of the orator, as one of his colleagues. In the following year, B. C. 61, he governed Sicily as propraetor, where P. Clodius served under him as quaestor. He was still in Sicily in B. C. 58, when Cicero was banished; and notwithstanding his friendship with Cicero, and his having been a colleague of his brother in the praetorship, he refused to allow Cicero to seek refuge in his province. (Cic. pro Planc. 40, ad Q. Fr. 1.2.2; Schol. Bob. in Clod. p. 333, ed. Orelli; Plut. Cic. 32.) In the civil war Virgilius espoused the Pompeian party, and had the command of Thapsus, together with a fleet, in B. C. 46. After the battle of Thapsus, Virgilius at first refused to surrender the town; but when he saw that all resistance was hopeless, he subsequently surrendered the place to Caninius Rebilus, whom Caesar had left to besiege it. (Hirt. B. Afr. 28, 86, 93.)