hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Garnett 137 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 124 0 Browse Search
Macon (Georgia, United States) 102 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 90 0 Browse Search
Augusta (Georgia, United States) 80 0 Browse Search
Albany (New York, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
I. Across Sherman 62 0 Browse Search
Elzey 54 50 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 42 0 Browse Search
Albert Bacon 40 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865. Search the whole document.

Found 646 total hits in 151 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 4
of Lee's surrender, and of the armistice between Johnston and Sherman. Alas, we all know only too well what that armistice means! It is all over with us now, and there is nothing to do but bow our heads in the dust and let the hateful conquerors trample us under their feet. There is a complete revulsion in public feeling. No more talk now about fighting to the last ditch; the last ditch has already been reached; no more talk about help from France and England, but all about emigration to Mexico and Brazil. We are irretrievably ruined, past the power of France and England to save us now. Europe has quietly folded her hands and beheld a noble nation perish. God grant she may yet have cause to repent her cowardice and folly in suffering this monstrous power that has crushed us to roll on unchecked. We fought nobly and fell bravely, overwhelmed by numbers and resources, with never a hand held out to save us. I hate all the world when I think of it. I am crushed and bowed down to th
ighting to the last ditch; the last ditch has already been reached; no more talk about help from France and England, but all about emigration to Mexico and Brazil. We are irretrievably ruined, past the power of France and England to save us now. Europe has quietly folded her hands and beheld a noble nation perish. God grant she may yet have cause to repent her cowardice and folly in suffering this monstrous power that has crushed us to roll on unchecked. We fought nobly and fell bravely, over. Hudson, of Richmond. He was an attache of the American legation in Berlin while Cousin Bolling was there studying his profession, and they have both come back with the charming manners and small affectations that Americans generally acquire in Europe, especially if they have associated much with the aristocracy. People may laugh, but these polished manners do make men very nice and comfortable to be with. They are so adaptable, and always know just the right thing to say and do. Mrs. El
Union Springs (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
l escarpment many miles in length, overlooking the rich prairie lands of South-East Alabama. On top of this bluff the owners of the great cotton plantations in the prairie made their homes, and for some five or six miles north of the town of Union Springs, about midway between Montgomery and Eufaula, the edge of the bluff was lined with a succession of stately mansions surrounded by beautiful parks and gardens, very much as the water front of a fashionable seaside resort is built up to-day. Tlley we traveled without interruption to Macon, where the excitement is at its climax. The Yankees are expected here at any moment, from both north and south, having divided their forces at Tuskegee, it is said, and sent one column by way of Union Springs and Columbus, and another through Opelika and West Point. I saw some poor little fortifications thrown up along the line of the South-Western, with a handful of men guarding them, and that is the only preparation for defense I have seen. We
Eufaula (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
miles north of the town of Union Springs, about midway between Montgomery and Eufaula, the edge of the bluff was lined with a succession of stately mansions surrounrt has come that the Yankees have taken Selma, and a raid is advancing towards Eufaula, so that puts a stop to our Chunnennuggee trip. I can't say that I am disappol 15, Saturday A new rumor, that the Yankees are at Glenville, advancing on Eufaula, but those best qualified to judge seem to think this move only a feint, and come and see them. They had passed through Cuthbert on the morning train from Eufaula, but they had not gone fifteen miles beyond it when the boiler to their engineRenaud, and a number of others came to see us off. When the train arrived from Eufaula it was already crowded with refugees, besides 300 volunteers from the exempts hting had already begun at Columbus, and that a raid had been sent out towards Eufaula. Excitement on the train was intense. At Ward's Station, a dreary-looking li
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
t their deserts. April 18, Tuesday The first train on the Georgia R. R., from Atlanta to Augusta, was scheduled to run through to-day, and we started off on the Macon & Western so as to reach where. Gen. Elzey and staff left early in the morning to take up their new quarters either in Augusta or Washington, and if we had only known it, we might have gone out with them. I took a walk onlthall, going to Washington to visit Gen. Toombs's family, and Mrs. Paul Hammond, on her way to Augusta. Many people had to leave their baggage behind, and others still were not able to find even sthere we were. Every conveyance in town had been pressed for removing government stores-where? Augusta is supposed to be the next objective point of the enemy, and Milledgeville is directly on the red but little faster than our mule team. However, we reached Camack in time for the train from Augusta, and as we drew up at the platform, somebody thrust his head in at the window and shouted: Linc
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ome of the passengers who had come with us from Cuthbert, happened to hear him say that he was going to South-West Georgia to get his sisters, and told him that we were there. From Fort Valley we traveled without interruption to Macon, where the excitement is at its climax. The Yankees are expected here at any moment, from both north and south, having divided their forces at Tuskegee, it is said, and sent one column by way of Union Springs and Columbus, and another through Opelika and West Point. I saw some poor little fortifications thrown up along the line of the South-Western, with a handful of men guarding them, and that is the only preparation for defense I have seen. We are told that the city is to be defended, but if that is so, the Lord only knows where the men are to come from. The general opinion seems to be that it is to be evacuated, and every preparation seems to be going forward to that end. All the horses that could be found have been pressed for the removal of g
Thomasville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
t. But our aim was bad, and it fell short, so the poor creatures didn't get it, and if any of them noticed, I expect they thought we were only d-- d rebel women throwing our waste in their faces to insult them. I am glad they are going to be exchanged, anyway, and leave a climate that seems to be so unfriendly to them, though I think it is the garden spot of the world. If I had my choice of all the climates I know anything about, to live in, I would choose the region between Macon and Thomasville. The railroad from Smithville to Cuthbert runs into the oaky woods beyond Smithville, which are more broken and undulating than the pine flats, and the swamps are larger and more beautiful on account of the greater variety of vegetation. They are a huge mosaic, at this season, of wild azaleas, Atamasco lilies, yellow jessamine, and a hundred other brilliant wild flowers. My taste may be very perverted, but to my mind there is no natural scenery in the world so beautiful as a big Sou
Berlin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
green leaves on the trees and the Cherokee roses in full bloom, flinging their white festoons clear over the top of the big sycamore by the gate! Surely this old home of ours is the choicest spot of all the world. The first thing we did after seeing everybody and shaking hands all round with the negroes, was to take a good bath, and I had just finished dressing when Mrs. Elzey called, with Cousin Bolling's friend, Capt. Hudson, of Richmond. He was an attache of the American legation in Berlin while Cousin Bolling was there studying his profession, and they have both come back with the charming manners and small affectations that Americans generally acquire in Europe, especially if they have associated much with the aristocracy. People may laugh, but these polished manners do make men very nice and comfortable to be with. They are so adaptable, and always know just the right thing to say and do. Mrs. Elzey says the general is coming to Washington with the rest of his staff,
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
se, and Fred hopes to get us out by way of Milledgeville, before they arrive. When our train got ball for nothing. April 19, Wednesday. Milledgeville They began to evacuate the city [Macon] morning, to secure seats on the train for Milledgeville, and had just thrown ourselves on the bed,ation for it on one of his cars, as far as Milledgeville. We gratified a pretty girl from MontgomeThere goes Joe Brown. But when we reached Milledgeville, he heaped coals of fire on my head by offthe next objective point of the enemy, and Milledgeville is directly on the road from there to Macohockingly defaced, like everything else in Milledgeville. There don't seem to be a clean or a whol the door and we bade a joyous farewell to Milledgeville. It was only a shabby little covered cartty biscuit apiece that we had brought from Milledgeville, for we could buy nothing to eat along therming captain fell dead in love with me at Milledgeville, and was so struck with my appearance tha
Gopher Hill (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
edge of the bluff was lined with a succession of stately mansions surrounded by beautiful parks and gardens, very much as the water front of a fashionable seaside resort is built up to-day. The writer had frequently visited this delightful place with her cousin, Miss Victoria Hoxey (Tolie of the diary), who had a married sister living there. April 3, Monday. Albany, Ga All of us very miserable at the thought of parting. Mrs. Meals goes with us as far as Wooten's, on her way to Gopher Hill, so sister and the children are left alone. Brother Troup has been ordered to Gen. Wofford's command in North Georgia, and this separation adds to her feeling of loneliness, but she and the children will soon join us in Washington, so it won't matter so much. The ride to Albany was very unpleasant, the sun scorching hot, the glare of the sand blinding, and Mrs. Meals with a headache. Mr. George Hull writes that the Georgia R. R. will be open for travel by the last of this month, and s
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...