hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. S. Johnston 1,542 0 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 865 67 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 578 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 515 3 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 458 0 Browse Search
William Preston Johnston 445 3 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 436 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 404 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 347 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 341 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

Found 484 total hits in 94 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 9: the Mexican War. General Taylor occupies Corpus Christi. horsemanship of the Texans. Taylor moves to the Rio Grande. hostilities by the Mexicans. battle of Palo Alto. Resacaes, as belonging to Tamaulipas, General Taylor, pending negotiations, established himself at Corpus Christi, near the mouth of the Nueces, where he remained until March 8, 1846. Love, writing to Gquesting his recommendation of General Johnston as colonel of one of the new regiments: Corpus Christi, Texas, February 8, 1846. Dear sir: Your esteemed favor of the 17th ult., from Galveston, reHe had been ten years in Texas, and much in the field, without seeing one; but after passing Corpus Christi they appeared in great numbers, fiercely rearing themselves up and offering battle to an app desired to give me rank next himself in the Texas quota of four regiments, to go by land to Corpus Christi. Once away from Galveston there was no opportunity of writing until I should reach this poi
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
species of fort), across a branch of the St. Juan, which runs through the city. The Tennesseans and Mississippians of Butler's division and a few regulars under Captain Backus, moving rapidly in support, attacked the first battery or redoubt, a strong work armed with artillery and escopetas or muskets, and bravely carried the work (Alexander McClung, at the head of the Mississippians of his wing of the regiment, being the first to enter), driving the enemy from it with considerable loss. The Ohio regiment, under Colonel Mitchell, entered the town more to the right, and attacked the works with great courage and spirit; but here was concentrated the fire of all their works. From this point, or a little in the rear, the regulars had been forced back with great loss of officers and men, after keeping up the attack for more than an hour, and after having lost in killed and wounded a great number. Having been ordered to retire, the Ohio regiment did so in tolerably good order. As it de
Brazos Island (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
vanced guard has been pushed to Reynosa, about 60 miles above Matamoras, and several regiments are marching upon the same point; but, on account of the great quantity of rain which fell last month, their progress is necessarily slow. I am daily expecting my regiment to march. The troops are occupying Point Isabel, Brazos Santiago, Burita on the Rio Grande, Matamoras, and Reynosa, but we have no means of ascertaining the number-say 14,000. I visited the camp of the Louisville Legion on Brazos Island; they are a fine body of men; they are now at Burita. Rogers Lieutenant-Colonel Jason Rogers, of the Louisville Legion-General Johnston's brother-in-law. was quite well. Very truly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. Point Isabel, Texas, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancock: When I last wrote to you we knew nothing of our destination. The discharge of all the Louisiana regiments created great uneasiness among the Texas regiments, lest they, being six months men, should also be dischar
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
the Rio Grande unless Mexico should make or declare war, in which case I would act on the offensive. Whether war will grow out of this movement, time must determine; but I, for one, hope that all difficulties between the two countries will be settled without an appeal to the sword; but, if war must come, I trust we will not only be prepared to meet it, but to bring it to a speedy and honorable termination. With sincere regards, I remain, yours truly, Z. Taylor. To Mr. George Hancock, Louisville, Ky. When General Taylor found that he would have to contend with a greatly superior force of Mexicans, he called for volunteers to sustain his movement. The Texan Legislature promptly passed a bill raising the quota of that State. It was proposed to confer upon the Governor, who was himself requested to take chief command, the appointment of field and staff officers; and, under this supposition, Governor Henderson wrote, May 8th, urging General Johnston to meet him at Point Isabel, an
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): chapter 10
field division of volunteers under Major-General Butler, which I accepted, as I was desirous of participating in the campaign which was about to commence. The army moved from Camargo, and was concentrated at Ceralvo on the 12th; and marched thence to Monterey, successively in divisions, on the 13th, 14th, and 15th, as follows: Twiggs's division on the 13th, Worth's on the 14th, and Butler's on the 15th. They were again united at Marin on the 17th, and arrived together at the forest of St. Domingo, three miles from Monterey, on the 19th. The 19th and 20th were passed in reconnoitring the position of the enemy's defenses and making the necessary disposition for the attack. These arrangements having been made, and General Worth's division having occupied the gorge of the mountain above the city on the Saltillo road, the attack was commenced by General Worth, who had by his position taken all their defenses in reverse, and pressed by him on the 21st until he had captured two of thei
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e to Mexico. These movements would compel a concentration of the strength of Mexico at the capital, where a decisive engagement would soon be fought with adequate force and the war terminated. Mexico is to that republic what Paris is to France. If Mexico falls, her dependencies fall with her. Why, then, waste a cartridge on the castle of St. Juan d'ulloa, or throw away the public treasure in a war of marches against a country without population comparatively, as Santa F6, Chihuahua, or California? These are portions of country which Mexico does not pretend to defend against the Indians. Your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. A letter to Hancock, written August 11th, near Camargo, informs him of the movement of the troops from Matamoras to that point, and describes what he saw in his voyage up the Rio Grande. He portrays the six days journey up the tortuous channel of that river, its alluvial banks with their teeming crops, and the half-barbarous population gathered there, tog
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
to protect the frontier against the invasion threatened by Mexico. As Mexico not only asserted a general right to the soverMexico not only asserted a general right to the sovereignty of Texas, but also set up a special claim to the country between the Rio Grande and the Nueces, as belonging to Tamaunsportation, etc.); but not to cross the Rio Grande unless Mexico should make or declare war, in which case I would act on t The war should be conducted directly against the city of Mexico, the seat of vitality and strength. Apart from all sciencining an army corps at Monterey, or on the route thence to Mexico. These movements would compel a concentration of the strength of Mexico at the capital, where a decisive engagement would soon be fought with adequate force and the war terminated. Mexico is to that republic what Paris is to France. If Mexico falls, her dependencies fall with her. Why, then, waste a cuahua, or California? These are portions of country which Mexico does not pretend to defend against the Indians. Your f
Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
he route thence to Mexico. These movements would compel a concentration of the strength of Mexico at the capital, where a decisive engagement would soon be fought with adequate force and the war terminated. Mexico is to that republic what Paris is to France. If Mexico falls, her dependencies fall with her. Why, then, waste a cartridge on the castle of St. Juan d'ulloa, or throw away the public treasure in a war of marches against a country without population comparatively, as Santa F6, Chihuahua, or California? These are portions of country which Mexico does not pretend to defend against the Indians. Your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. A letter to Hancock, written August 11th, near Camargo, informs him of the movement of the troops from Matamoras to that point, and describes what he saw in his voyage up the Rio Grande. He portrays the six days journey up the tortuous channel of that river, its alluvial banks with their teeming crops, and the half-barbarous population gath
Monterey (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
oint of operation, retaining an army corps at Monterey, or on the route thence to Mexico. These movuppose in fifteen or twenty days, will be for Monterey. General Johnston had taken great pride inh his comrades under Shivers in the attack on Monterey. The following letter, written soon aftert the forest of St. Domingo, three miles from Monterey, on the 19th. The 19th and 20th were passed clear and succinct account of the storming of Monterey I add the following interesting description officer when he fell wounded in the streets of Monterey, at the point mentioned by Mr. Davis as the pous estimate of General Johnston's conduct at Monterey: In approaching the subject of your letrom Camargo, and during the operations before Monterey, resulting in its capture, with zeal, efficiech under his command won great distinction at Monterey, and subsequently at Buena Vista performed ex After we had ridden, perhaps a mile, out of Monterey, on our way to General Taylor's headquarters,[7 more...]
Nueces River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ight to the sovereignty of Texas, but also set up a special claim to the country between the Rio Grande and the Nueces, as belonging to Tamaulipas, General Taylor, pending negotiations, established himself at Corpus Christi, near the mouth of the Nueces, where he remained until March 8, 1846. Love, writing to General Johnston in September, 1845, says: General Taylor has 4,000 soldiers at Corpus Chriati. Six companies of Texan Rangers, under Hays, have been mustered into service. Theys of hostility committed by the Mexicans, a fortification was erected opposite Matamoras, afterward known as Fort Brown. On the 12th of April General Ampudia addressed a letter to General Taylor, requiring him to withdraw to the left bank of the Nueces, or that arms alone must decide the question. A little later, the Mexicans captured Captain Thornton and 60 men, and committed other overt acts of war; and, finally, threatened General Taylor's communications with Point Isabel, his base of supp
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...