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Jefferson Barracks (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ruited with farmers' sons and other daring young men, making its complement of men (850) about the middle of August. The recruits were rendezvoused at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, under the command of Major Hardee, with orders to march to the frontier of Texas in October. General Johnston was troubled at being absent from his reed some from cholera and other diseases, which has caused a considerable number to desert. I do not expect desertion to cease while the regiment remains at Jefferson Barracks. He was relieved, however, early in October, and proceeded to assume the command of his regiment. Major Hardee, an officer of tact, intelligence, and ot even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, No
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
pinion of General Johnston's qualities had greatly improved on a better acquaintance. Thus while General Johnston was undergoing the combined hardships, drudgery, and mental torture, arising out of his duties and losses as paymaster, a kind Providence and zealous friends advanced him to the very position which he preferred to all others. It is true that he had never held a regular cavalry command, though he had served with the rangers in Texas; but his professional knowledge was wide, and hnt, we stand to listen for the insolent shouts of the greedy wreckers. May Divine interposition prevent the shock! San Antonio, Texas, September 12, 1856. My dear son: We are all well, but good health is no novelty here; the beneficence of Providence has accorded this blessing to all the inhabitants of this beautiful region. The simplicity of our habits, from the necessity of practising a rigid economy, imposes upon us the fulfillment of the conditions which insure that blessing to us. Aft
Utah (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ters before he suffered a relapse, which brought him to the verge of the grave. His strong constitution at last brought him safely through. Writing about the middle of May, he says: I try my physical powers a little every day. I have been so little accustomed to sickness that I can hardly realize it, and find myself inclined constantly to jump up and go right off to work. He was gradually restored to strength and health, but did not recover his robust appearance until braced by a winter in Utah. During the summer and fall of 1856 all other interests were subordinate to the political struggle which resulted in the election of Mr. Buchanan, the Democratic candidate, over Fremont, the nominee of the Antislavery party. The following letters are inserted, because they clearly define General Johnston's views on the subject of abolitionism and his apprehensions at that time. On the 21st of August, writing from San Antonio to the author, he says: The best friends of the Union
William Preston Johnston (search for this): chapter 13
tradition. Mr. Davis reverses the rule. General Johnston made Colonel of the Second cavalry. no F with the frontier people. his motives. General Johnston's influence with Young men. two illustratier of Texas. It was a happy day for General Johnston when, mounting his splendid gray charger,or the comfort of the officers' families, General Johnston reserved only one small room for his own commanders, even when deserving. When General Johnston reached Fort Mason, the border was full og instance is given as an illustration of General Johnston's mode of dealing with the people of the cember 24, 1856, inclosing the foregoing, General Johnston remarks: They praise or condemn on hat night between ten and twelve o'clock, General Johnston entered his room, and inquired whether hece. Before answering, my informant asked General Johnston whether he proposed to take official actiold that such had been the advice given. General Johnston then asked whether he had counted the cos[41 more...]
f cavalry, which was intended for immediate service in Texas, General Johnston was appointed as colonel, with rank from March 3, 1855. Brevet Colonel Robert E. Lee was made lieutenant-colonel; and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel William J. Hardee and Major George H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, Charles W. Field, Chambliss, and Phifer, became Southern generals; and K. Garrard and others attained the same place in the Northern army. It is doubtful whether any other one regiment furnished an equal number of distinguished officers to the two contending armies during the grea
William E. Jones (search for this): chapter 13
of General Johnston's mode of dealing with the people of the frontier. The citizens of Hays and Comal Counties joined in a petition to General Johnston, requesting him to station a force to protect their settlements. To their spokesman, Judge William E. Jones, General Johnston sent the following reply: San Antonio, Texas, December 1, 1S56. dear sir: Your letter in relation to the exposed condition of the settlements between the Guadalupe and Pedernalis Rivers, embracing those of the Blanco frontier of such extent, presenting so many facilities of approach and concealment, small parties can elude the vigilance of their scouts, and penetrate into the settlements. With great respect, your obedient servant, A. S. Johnston. Hon. W. E. Jones. Commenting upon this in grateful terms, a local journal says: This is one of the few efforts made by regular officers to conciliate the people and secure their services. It is the first step toward producing the harmony and good fe
his own career, he continued: The days of Quixotism are past, and with them the chance for name and fame in all such enterprises as this. The age is materialistic, and he who goes about in search of windmills and giants is apt to be considered a fit candidate for Bedlam. The question, however, wears a moral aspect, which should be duly weighed and considered. Is there any material difference between the filibuster and the buccaneer? Tell me not of philanthropy as a plea. I say of it as Roland's wife said of liberty: Alas I how many crimes are committed in thy name! Besides, if you are pining for adventure, you will not have long to wait. Liberty and philanthropy are at work, and on a broader field than yours. Fanaticism will soon bring on a sectional collision between the States of the Union, in which every man will have to choose his side. When it comes there will be no lack of blows, and may God help the right! Then give up your present project, and wait. Go to Austin a
K. Garrard (search for this): chapter 13
rward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, Charles W. Field, Chambliss, and Phifer, became Southern generals; and K. Garrard and others attained the same place in the Northern army. It is doubtful whether any other one regiment furnished an equal number of distinguished officers to the two contending armies during the great civil war. McCulloch, in his disappointment at not receiving a colonel's commission, refused the position of major tendered him. He had been a gallant and enterprising leader of partisan troops, and deserved well of his country. His nomination was a high compliment, as he was the only f
orge H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, Charles W. Field, Chambliss, and Phifer, became Southern generals; and K. Garrard and others attained the same place in the Northern army. It is doubtful whether any other one regiment furnished an equal number of distinguished officers to the two contending armies during the great civil war. McCulloch, in his disappointment at not receiving a colonel's commission, refused the position of major tendered him. He had been a gallant and enterprising leader of partisan troops, and deserved well of his country. His nomination was
Stephen F. Austin (search for this): chapter 13
n when deserving. When General Johnston reached Fort Mason, the border was full of terror. The year 1855 had been one of unusual disaster and suffering. The Indians had murdered and pillaged as far down as the Blanco, within twenty miles of Austin, and even below San Antonio, in September. The arrival of the Second Cavalry changed the aspect of affairs; and a vigorous warfare upon the Comanches, illustrated by many successful combats, gave an unwonted security to the settlers. General soon bring on a sectional collision between the States of the Union, in which every man will have to choose his side. When it comes there will be no lack of blows, and may God help the right! Then give up your present project, and wait. Go to Austin and enter on your profession there. I will give you letters which will insure you an advantageous business connection there. By these arguments, here given almost in his very words, and similar ones, he again induced me to defer my wishes to hi
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