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P. H. Bell (search for this): chapter 13
addressed to Senator Rusk, and urged the cooperation of himself and his colleagues in securing the object of the petition. When the bill was passed, in 1855, General Rusk, who needed no other prompting than his own feelings in the matter, used active efforts to secure the appointment for General Johnston. His position was somewhat embarrassing, as that gallant and popular partisan leader, Major Ben McCulloch, was vehemently pressed by influential friends for the same appointment. Hon. P. H. Bell, although an advocate of the claims of McCulloch, kindly offered a testimonial to the capacity and character of General Johnston. Hon. William Preston, member of Congress from Kentucky, was in the opposition, but was able, perhaps partly on that account, to smooth the way for General Johnston's promotion. But as it had been General Johnston's good fortune previously to be personally known and appreciated by President Taylor, so he chanced again to have in the Secretary of War a friend
Robert W. Johnson (search for this): chapter 13
855. Brevet Colonel Robert E. Lee was made lieutenant-colonel; and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel William J. Hardee and Major George H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, Charles W. Field, Chambliss, and Phifer, became Southern generals; and K. Garrard and others attained the same place in the Northern army. It is doubtful whether any other one regiment furnished an equal number of distinguished officers to the two contending armies during the great civil war. McCulloch, in his disappointment at not receiving a colonel's commission, refused the position of major tendered
N. G. Evans (search for this): chapter 13
immediate service in Texas, General Johnston was appointed as colonel, with rank from March 3, 1855. Brevet Colonel Robert E. Lee was made lieutenant-colonel; and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel William J. Hardee and Major George H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, Charles W. Field, Chambliss, and Phifer, became Southern generals; and K. Garrard and others attained the same place in the Northern army. It is doubtful whether any other one regiment furnished an equal number of distinguished officers to the two contending armies during the great civil war. McCulloch, in his
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 13
d would not have ventured upon a freedom with him. In the course of an eventful life and extensive travel, I have come in con. tact with many of the historic personages of the day; and yet I scruple not to say that of them all, but three, to my thinking, would stand the test of the most rigid scrutiny. Of these, by a singular coincidence, the colonel and lieutenant-colonel of a cavalry regiment in the United States Army, afterward respectively the ranking officers of a hostile army, Albert Sidney Johnston and Robert E. Lee, were two; the third was Mr. Calhoun. No time-serving or self-seeking entered into their calculations. Self-abnegation at the bidding of duty was the rule of their lives. Could our much-maligned section lay no further claim to the consideration of mankind, the fact that it produced, almost in the same generation, such a triumvirate, typical of their people, is enough to place it among the foremost nations of the earth in the realms of thought, honor, patriotism,
Zachary Taylor (search for this): chapter 13
Administration was taking shape, the friends of different aspirants for appointment or promotion naturally urged their claims in the usual manner. General Johnston followed the same line of conduct which he had prescribed for himself during General Taylor's Administration, and abstained from presenting his claims. His patient performance of the duties of paymaster, however, incited the friends who witnessed it to move on his behalf. The Texas Legislature contained a number of those brave spi from Kentucky, was in the opposition, but was able, perhaps partly on that account, to smooth the way for General Johnston's promotion. But as it had been General Johnston's good fortune previously to be personally known and appreciated by President Taylor, so he chanced again to have in the Secretary of War a friend who had known him from boyhood and who esteemed him as highly as any man living. Mr. Preston wrote: Johnston's merits should have given him a regiment years ago, but his pride an
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 13
Second cavalry is now styled the Fifth cavalry. Pierce elected. Jefferson Davis Secretary of War. strength of the army. increase of force asked. actionure. Senator Rusk. William Preston. political appointments the tradition. Mr. Davis reverses the rule. General Johnston made Colonel of the Second cavalry. no r. When General Franklin Pierce was elected President, he appointed General Jefferson Davis Secretary of War. Pierce's gallantry, amiability, and address, had enbut his pride and delicacy have always prevented him from pressing his claims. Davis was truly his friend. It had been a custom, almost passing into precedent, oor the most part, from the army. The political pressure brought to bear upon Mr. Davis was very great, but no man was ever less amenable to such considerations; and Long before his untimely death in battle, he had the generosity to say that Mr. Davis had acted wisely in preferring General Johnston above him. General Scott
ured upon a freedom with him. In the course of an eventful life and extensive travel, I have come in con. tact with many of the historic personages of the day; and yet I scruple not to say that of them all, but three, to my thinking, would stand the test of the most rigid scrutiny. Of these, by a singular coincidence, the colonel and lieutenant-colonel of a cavalry regiment in the United States Army, afterward respectively the ranking officers of a hostile army, Albert Sidney Johnston and Robert E. Lee, were two; the third was Mr. Calhoun. No time-serving or self-seeking entered into their calculations. Self-abnegation at the bidding of duty was the rule of their lives. Could our much-maligned section lay no further claim to the consideration of mankind, the fact that it produced, almost in the same generation, such a triumvirate, typical of their people, is enough to place it among the foremost nations of the earth in the realms of thought, honor, patriotism, and knightly grace.
William Joseph Hardee (search for this): chapter 13
tical pressure brought to bear upon Mr. Davis was very great, but no man was ever less amenable to such considerations; and that his appointments were made with sole reference to efficiency is best evinced by the subsequent careers of the men selected. To the Second Regiment of cavalry, which was intended for immediate service in Texas, General Johnston was appointed as colonel, with rank from March 3, 1855. Brevet Colonel Robert E. Lee was made lieutenant-colonel; and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel William J. Hardee and Major George H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, C
Charles W. Field (search for this): chapter 13
lliam J. Hardee and Major George H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, Charles W. Field, Chambliss, and Phifer, became Southern generals; and K. Garrard and others attained the same place in the Northern army. It is doubtful whether any other one regiment furnished an equal number of distinguished officers to the two contending armies during the great civil war. McCulloch, in his disappointment at not receiving a colonel's commission, refused the position of major tendered him. He had been a gallant and enterprising leader of partisan troops, and deserved well of his
Thomas J. Rusk (search for this): chapter 13
Jefferson Davis Secretary of War. strength of the army. increase of force asked. action of General Johnston's friends. recommended by Texas Legislature. Senator Rusk. William Preston. political appointments the tradition. Mr. Davis reverses the rule. General Johnston made Colonel of the Second cavalry. no Favoritisms. of the proposed regiments. This memorial, dated January 8, 1854, in which the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and Speaker of the House united, was addressed to Senator Rusk, and urged the cooperation of himself and his colleagues in securing the object of the petition. When the bill was passed, in 1855, General Rusk, who needeGeneral Rusk, who needed no other prompting than his own feelings in the matter, used active efforts to secure the appointment for General Johnston. His position was somewhat embarrassing, as that gallant and popular partisan leader, Major Ben McCulloch, was vehemently pressed by influential friends for the same appointment. Hon. P. H. Bell, although
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