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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ghbors. enlistment of his Regiment. March to Texas with the Second cavalry. suffering from cold.y, which was intended for immediate service in Texas, General Johnston was appointed as colonel, wimand, though he had served with the rangers in Texas; but his professional knowledge was wide, and ardee, with orders to march to the frontier of Texas in October. General Johnston was troubled at be column was put in motion for the frontier of Texas. It was a happy day for General Johnston wcavalry, nearly 800 strong, on the road toward Texas. As Texas was to be their home for some years by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preshree weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the elevated table-lands, ng suddenly down on the highest table-lands of Texas, 2,000 feet above the sea, upon a regiment onlus loss on the enemy, and made the frontier of Texas a safe residence in comparison to what it is n[2 more...]
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
set of people. A man refused to sell me fresh milk for my sick baby at any price; for, said he, that milk has butter in it. After it is churned, if you will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While
San Antonio (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
over. Having been ordered, on the 2d of April, to proceed to San Antonio to take command of the department, he made the journey on horsebrehensions at that time. On the 21st of August, writing from San Antonio to the author, he says: The best friends of the Union begireedy wreckers. May Divine interposition prevent the shock! San Antonio, Texas, September 12, 1856. My dear son: We are all well, but gooown as the Blanco, within twenty miles of Austin, and even below San Antonio, in September. The arrival of the Second Cavalry changed the asWilliam E. Jones, General Johnston sent the following reply: San Antonio, Texas, December 1, 1S56. dear sir: Your letter in relation to th the son of a friend of General Johnston, and, having settled at San Antonio as a lawyer while the latter had his headquarters there, was at lows by my informant: A battalion was raised in and around San Antonio to go to General Walker's assistance, and I was waited upon by a
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
no other prompting than his own feelings in the matter, used active efforts to secure the appointment for General Johnston. His position was somewhat embarrassing, as that gallant and popular partisan leader, Major Ben McCulloch, was vehemently pressed by influential friends for the same appointment. Hon. P. H. Bell, although an advocate of the claims of McCulloch, kindly offered a testimonial to the capacity and character of General Johnston. Hon. William Preston, member of Congress from Kentucky, was in the opposition, but was able, perhaps partly on that account, to smooth the way for General Johnston's promotion. But as it had been General Johnston's good fortune previously to be personally known and appreciated by President Taylor, so he chanced again to have in the Secretary of War a friend who had known him from boyhood and who esteemed him as highly as any man living. Mr. Preston wrote: Johnston's merits should have given him a regiment years ago, but his pride and delicacy
Fort Washita (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
n it. After it is churned, if you will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the elevated table-lands, some sixty miles northeast of Fort Belknap, the regiment was caught by a terrible no
Comal County (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
might be multiplied, but it is unnecessary. A vacancy occurring in the rank of brigadier-general, a great many of the Texas journals testified their good — will by expressing the hope that General Johnston would be appointed to it; a fact which is now mentioned merely to show their satisfaction with his administration on their frontier. The following instance is given as an illustration of General Johnston's mode of dealing with the people of the frontier. The citizens of Hays and Comal Counties joined in a petition to General Johnston, requesting him to station a force to protect their settlements. To their spokesman, Judge William E. Jones, General Johnston sent the following reply: San Antonio, Texas, December 1, 1S56. dear sir: Your letter in relation to the exposed condition of the settlements between the Guadalupe and Pedernalis Rivers, embracing those of the Blanco, has been received. Captain Bradfute, Second Cavalry, with the effective strength of his company, h
Preston (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the elevated table-lands, some sixty miles northeast of Fort Belknap, the regiment was caught by a terrible norther. General Johnston says in
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ultivated country, but inhabited by a mean set of people. A man refused to sell me fresh milk for my sick baby at any price; for, said he, that milk has butter in it. After it is churned, if you will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the col
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
our obedient servant, A. S. Johnston. Hon. W. E. Jones. Commenting upon this in grateful terms, a local journal says: This is one of the few efforts made by regular officers to conciliate the people and secure their services. It is the first step toward producing the harmony and good feeling which ought to exist between the Texans and the United States Army. Colonel Johnston, notwithstanding he is an officer of the army, does not forget he is at the same time a citizen of the United States. This is a sentiment, it is to be feared, some officers do not entertain, or cannot sufficiently appreciate. The people of this State were much gratified when they learned Colonel Johnston had charge of this department. His course, and the successes of his officers, have fully met their expectations, and, should he be continued, there is an abiding trust reposed in his ability to give protection to the frontier. In a letter to the author, dated December 24, 1856, inclosing the
Newcastle (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
r 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the elevated table-lands, some sixty miles northeast of Fort Belknap, the regiment was caught by a terrible norther. General Johnston says in a letter to the writer, of January 17th: Norther! It makes me cold to write the word. I do not believe that any of the hyperborean explorers felt the cold more intensely than did my regiment. Noble fellows! Officers and men, they will always be found at their post, wherever duty calls them. Think of a northern blast, sixty miles an hour, unceasing, unrelenting (the mercury below zero, ice six inches thick)
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