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o kill the entire company, except the little children. The Mormon regiment, with some Indian auxiliaries, attacked the emigrants soon after they broke up camp on September 12th. The travelers quickly rallied, corraled their wagons, and kept up such a fire that the assailants were afraid to come to close quarters. Reinforcements were sent for, and arrived; but still the Mormons did not venture to assault the desperate men, who were fighting for their wives and little ones. At last, on the 15th, the fourth day of the siege, Lee sent in a flag of truce, offering, if the emigrants would lay down their arms, to protect them. They complied, laid down their arms, and half an hour afterward the massacre began. All were killed except seventeen little children. Every atrocity accompanied the slaughter, and the corpses were mutilated and left naked on the ground. Three men got out of the valley, two of whom were soon overtaken and killed; the other reached Muddy Creek, fifty miles off, a
ere unfounded. A judge, the attorney, and the marshal of the district court, were also Mormons. Two of the judges were Gentiles. Thus was impressed a Mormon policy upon the Federal relations of the Territory. The Federal officers arrived in July, and were soon involved in trouble. Judge Brocchus reprobated polygamy in a public assembly, and was told by the Governor, I will kick you or any other Gentile judge from this stand, if you or they again attempt to interfere with the affairs of oe as rotten as an old pumpkin that has been frozen seven times and melted in a harvest sun. Come on with your thousands of illegally-ordered troops, and I will promise you, in the name of Israel's God, that you shall melt away as the snow before a July sun. . . . You might as well tell me you can make hell into a powder-house as to tell me you could let an army in here and have peace; and I intend to tell them and show them this if they do not stay away. . . . And I say our enemies shall not sli
September 3rd (search for this): chapter 14
ying colonies, at San Bernardino, Carson's, Washoe, and Jack's Valleys, and elsewhere, were called in; and these Saints sold for a song property soon after worth millions. Missionaries returned in disguise. Preparations for desperate revolt were made; and the people were taught that war to the knife, even to the desolation of the land, was to be the measure of their resistance. Major Van Vliet, the quartermaster, sent to purchase lumber for quarters, forage, and subsistence, arrived on September 3d, and found to his surprise that he could buy nothing for the Government, and that the troops were to be treated as enemies. He was told by Brigham Young that the troops now on the march for Utah should not enter Salt Lake Valley. Major Van Vliet explained that the action in regard to Utah was exactly that taken in regard to all the other Territories, and that no hostile demonstration against the inhabitants was contemplated. But he found the president, leaders, and people, unanimous
September 12th (search for this): chapter 14
was passed, devoting said company to destruction; and the militia was regularly called out under orders from a military council at Parowan. The authorities were Colonel W. H. Dame, Lieutenant-Colonel Tsaac C. Haight, President and High-Priest of Southern Utah, and Major John D. Lee, a bishop of the church. Their orders were to kill the entire company, except the little children. The Mormon regiment, with some Indian auxiliaries, attacked the emigrants soon after they broke up camp on September 12th. The travelers quickly rallied, corraled their wagons, and kept up such a fire that the assailants were afraid to come to close quarters. Reinforcements were sent for, and arrived; but still the Mormons did not venture to assault the desperate men, who were fighting for their wives and little ones. At last, on the 15th, the fourth day of the siege, Lee sent in a flag of truce, offering, if the emigrants would lay down their arms, to protect them. They complied, laid down their arms,
September 14th (search for this): chapter 14
enemies. He was told by Brigham Young that the troops now on the march for Utah should not enter Salt Lake Valley. Major Van Vliet explained that the action in regard to Utah was exactly that taken in regard to all the other Territories, and that no hostile demonstration against the inhabitants was contemplated. But he found the president, leaders, and people, unanimous in their determination to prevent United States troops from entering the valley. Major Van Vliet left on the 14th of September; and, on the next day, Brigham Young issued a proclamation of the most inflammatory character, beginning- Citizens of Utah: We are invaded by a hostile force who are evidently assailing us to accomplish our overthrow and destruction. After reciting the various supposed grounds of grievance against the United States, and declaring, Our duty to ourselves, to our families, requires us not tamely to be driven and slain without an attempt to preserve ourselves, he concludes:
September 16th (search for this): chapter 14
ve peace; and I intend to tell them and show them this if they do not stay away. . . . And I say our enemies shall not slip the bow on old Bright's neck again. God bless you! Amen. This declaration of independence by the Mormon Prophet was reiterated from every pulpit. It is a curious illustration of the power of fanaticism that the refutation of his fallacious revelations and the speedy failure of his prophecies did not shake the faith of his disciples. At the same meeting of September 16th, Heber Kimball, Brigham's first councilor, abject sycophant, and a blasphemous old buffoon, preached thus: Is there a collision between us and the United States? No; we have not collashed; that is the word that sounds nearest to what I mean. But now the thread is cut between them and us, and we will never gybe again-no, never, worlds without end (voices, Amen! ). . . .Do as you are told, and Brigham Young will never leave the governorship of this Territory, from this time hencefo
June 1st, 1801 AD (search for this): chapter 14
der gave a seal to the church. His place as seer and revelator of God, after a brief contest, was usurped by a man of real ability, grasp, and steady purpose. Brigham Young, one of his earliest converts and chief counselors, a man of rude, native strength and cunning and excellent administrative power, came to the front as successor. Holding with firm hand the reins of power, he guided the destiny of the Latter- Day Saints until his death in 1877. Brigham Young was born in Vermont, June 1, 1801, whence he was removed while an infant to New York by his father, who was a small farmer. Though brought up to farm-labor, he became a painter and glazier. He was an early proselyte in 1832, and joined Smith at Kirtland. He soon attained a high place in Smith's confidence, and in rank in the church. In 1835 he was made an apostle, and in 1836, president of the twelve apostles. He was absent in England two years on a successful mission; but, except during this absence, followed Smith'
n confederates animated by similar sordid motives, deliberately framed and preached and organized a system of religious imposture, which was to establish him as the prophet and vicegerent of the Most High. He pretended to announce his mission by divine revelation, and to attest it by miracles. Secretly he made it the instrument of unbounded license, and of a perfect despotism, spiritual and temporal, over his deluded followers. Joseph Smith was a native of Vermont, where he was born in 1805. His father removed during his boyhood to near Palmyra, New York. His family was of the vagabond class, thriftless and superstitious. They were people of the lowest social grade, subsisting on the proceeds of irregular labor-hunting, trapping, well-digging, and peddling beer and cakes, together with some shiftless and ill-directed work on the farm on which they had squatted. Their neighbors testified that they were idle, thriftless, and suspected of pilfering. The family were very ignora
th the hazel-rod. According to his own account, at the age of fifteen, he had a vision in which Christ appeared to him and warned him against all existing creeds and sects. He received his call as a prophet on the 23d of September, 1823, when Nephi, a messenger of God, appeared to him in a vision, and told him that God had a work for him to do, etc. It is not necessary to recapitulate here the steps by which a bold imposture rose to a formidable fanaticism. Smith began his practices in 1823, at the age of eighteen, but it was seven years later before Mormonism began to take shape as a sect. His shallow pretenses of the discovery of the book of Mormon, and of miraculous spectacles to read it with, and his other tricks, have all been laid bare. Nevertheless, he drew around him a band in which craftiness, audacity, and superstition, accompanied by an American aptitude for organization, were the marked characteristics. A sect was founded. Converts were made rapidly, and colon
September 23rd, 1823 AD (search for this): chapter 14
cupied his thoughts. He was, according to his father, the genus of the family. His neighbors assert that he professed to discover hidden treasures by the use of a peep-stone --a large crystal through which he looked-and that he was also a water-witch, who found wells with the hazel-rod. According to his own account, at the age of fifteen, he had a vision in which Christ appeared to him and warned him against all existing creeds and sects. He received his call as a prophet on the 23d of September, 1823, when Nephi, a messenger of God, appeared to him in a vision, and told him that God had a work for him to do, etc. It is not necessary to recapitulate here the steps by which a bold imposture rose to a formidable fanaticism. Smith began his practices in 1823, at the age of eighteen, but it was seven years later before Mormonism began to take shape as a sect. His shallow pretenses of the discovery of the book of Mormon, and of miraculous spectacles to read it with, and his other
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