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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
y grateful to him. There were considerations to hold him back from the fray that might well have weakened the stoutest resolution. A wife and helpless family of little children looked to him for protection and support. He had saved no fortune: fifteen hundred dollars made up his available means. And now, when a great public duty demanded his talents and experience, it seemed that it must yield to the more immediate call of domestic obligations. But the very spot and people to which Providence had led him afforded to his family a retreat unequaled for security, while a generous, affectionate, and vigorous protector was raised up for their care and succor. Dr. John S. Griffin, Mrs. Johnston's brother, had the will and power to relieve General Johnston's embarrassment, by taking charge of his family. To him they were committed, and nobly was the trust redeemed. Freed from this imperious demand, General Johnston made up his mind to sacrifice all private interests for the sake o
Tucson (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
scape. on the road. the desert. the Comet. Tucson. the Pimos Indians, anecdote. Federal troopsned Fort Breckinridge, and, in passing through Tucson toward Fort Buchanan, had burned the town griss, and grazed our animals on the pastures near Tucson, for two days. The country through which t tells the following anecdote of their stay at Tucson: Encamped near us was a party of Texas Utory were collected at Fort Buchanan, south of Tucson, but were preparing to evacuate the country anhe Fort Buchanan road came into the trail from Tucson to the Rio Grande, before the United States trthe column or camp under any pretext. Between Tucson and Mesilla we saw the wrecks of two stages wha, and thence two hundred and seventy miles to Tucson. July 18.Arrived at Tucson. July 22.Left TucTucson. July 22.Left Tucson, 8 A. M. Thirty miles. July 23.Forty miles to a dry camp. July 24.Fifteen miles to Dragoon SprTucson, 8 A. M. Thirty miles. July 23.Forty miles to a dry camp. July 24.Fifteen miles to Dragoon Springs, thence fifty miles to Apache Pass. July 25. July 26. July 27.From Apache Pass. One hundred an[1 more...]
Vallecito (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
that they may love you and each other. The march was begun from Warner's, June 27th, and a halt made June 30th, at Vallecito. The itinerary at the end of this chapter may be found useful in elucidating the incidents of the journey. General Johnston wrote as follows to his wife, from Vallecito: Vallecito, 180 miles to Yuma, Sunday, June 30, 1861. I received your letter of June 25th by Major Armistead, who arrived here this morning. Our party is now as large as need be desired forVallecito, 180 miles to Yuma, Sunday, June 30, 1861. I received your letter of June 25th by Major Armistead, who arrived here this morning. Our party is now as large as need be desired for safety or convenience in traveling. Eight resigned army-officers and twenty-five citizens. They are good men and well armed. Late of the army we have Major Armistead, Lieutenants Hardcastle, Brewer, Riley, Shaaf, Mallory, and Wickliffe. Of and preparing for the next stage of the journey. No effort was made to molest us. Ridley says: Traveling from Vallecito to Carrizo Creek, we observed a luminous appearance in the heavens resembling a comet, extending two-thirds across the
Cooks Spring (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ant had this story from Cochise, the chief who said he led the Indians. This massacre was between Apache Pass and Cook's Spring. The journey from Cook's Spring to the Rio Grande, some sixty miles, was made without camping. The road led to tCook's Spring to the Rio Grande, some sixty miles, was made without camping. The road led to the river at a point several miles above Mesilla, where was situated the little Mexican village of Picacho, inhabited by poor farmers, whose cornfields lay about the town. Eight miles below Mesilla was Fort Fillmore, with a strong Federal garrison, nce by a lady-he could not refuse. Ridley attributes the escape of Moore and Lord, when they burned their camp at Cook's Spring, and turned off to Fort Craig, to the negligence of the scouts, who did not report the movement for some twenty-four from the disorderly character of their march, and their apparent unconsciousness of danger. The troops were then at Cook's Spring, fifty miles from our camp at the forks of the road to Fort Thorn, fifty miles above here on the river. Our scouts t
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
fell in battle-Johnston, Armistead, Mallory, and Brewer, These young gentlemen, though accustomed to a life of comparative ease, rough it as well as the best of them; wash, cook, pack, and harness animals, etc. The party is well armed, and, by observing a good compact order of march and vigilance in camp, we will be free from any danger of attack from Indians. I think there is no need of apprehension of molestation on the part of the authorities, civil or military, unless orders come from Washington. Should there be such, I will have notice in time. We find it very hot in some parts of the day; in others, not unpleasant. We have, tell your brother, in our mess, Captain Dillard, Mr. Jordan, and Mr. Frazee; and, with Ran as our cook and driver of my carriage, I could have no better arrangement for the most comfortable traveling the season and route will admit of. I have ridden but a few miles in the carriage since we started ... I have nothing to say to my boys that has not alread
Los Angeles (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
s received at last, however, before he left Los Angeles, thus completely severing the tie that boune a rebel. While General Johnston was at Los Angeles a beautiful set of silver was sent to him, as closed to him. Soldiers had been sent to Los Angeles to watch his movements, and he was subjectePrior to the arrival of General Johnston in Los Angeles, Captain Alonso Ridley Captain Ridley issary to order a force of horse and foot to Los Angeles to observe our movements; and, as the time than a hundred miles on the road. He left Los Angeles at daybreak with Captain Ridley and his ser went to the Chino Ranch, thirty miles from Los Angeles, whence he was accompanied by Dr. Carman Frhe general's acquaintance on his arrival at Los Angeles, after his resignation. I was quietly engatable night's lodging. The journey from Los Angeles to Mesilla was 800 miles, and thence to Sand at Warner's Ranch. One hundred miles from Los Angeles. June 27.Left Warner's. To Vallecito. Jun[3 more...]
to Carrizo Creek, we observed a luminous appearance in the heavens resembling a comet, extending two-thirds across the heavens, its nucleus near the horizon toward the northwest. The general and I were riding together when we first observed it. He remarked that it was not strange that we should see sights and portents in the heavens, making playful allusion to events in old Rome. A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye. In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, (Were) stars with trains of fire and dews of blood And even the like precurse of fierce events, As harbingers preceding still the fates, And prologue to the omen coming on, Have heaven and earth together demonstrated, Unto our climatures and countrymen. Hamlet, Act I, Scene 1. Its appearance was so sudden that I am sure that there was not a man in the party upon whom it did not make an impression. Captain Gift says: At Blue Water we were met by two citizens of Tucson, who cam
Agua Caliente, in San Diego County, which was more than a hundred miles on the road. He left Los Angeles at daybreak with Captain Ridley and his servant Ran, and went to the Chino Ranch, thirty miles from Los Angeles, whence he was accompanied by Dr. Carman Frazee. Dr. Frazee knew the country well, and acted as guide. Frazee served as private in Colonel Jefferson Davis's First Mississippi Regiment in the Mexican War. They rested at Chino during part of the day, and then moved forward, Mr. Carlisle, the proprietor of the Chino, having first picketed the road with some of his saqueros, with orders to ride forward and warn the general should soldiers appear in his rear. In this event, he and Frazee would have made their way to Mexican territory on horseback. The Federals, however, had no knowledge of the general's departure, and did not follow him. About the 25th of June nearly the whole party had arrived at the rendezvous, where we found the general enjoying himself, though the wea
Thomas Jordan (search for this): chapter 19
imals, etc. The party is well armed, and, by observing a good compact order of march and vigilance in camp, we will be free from any danger of attack from Indians. I think there is no need of apprehension of molestation on the part of the authorities, civil or military, unless orders come from Washington. Should there be such, I will have notice in time. We find it very hot in some parts of the day; in others, not unpleasant. We have, tell your brother, in our mess, Captain Dillard, Mr. Jordan, and Mr. Frazee; and, with Ran as our cook and driver of my carriage, I could have no better arrangement for the most comfortable traveling the season and route will admit of. I have ridden but a few miles in the carriage since we started ... I have nothing to say to my boys that has not already been said. I have perfect confidence that they will be all that ought to be desired or expected. They must learn that one man by an exhibition of physical power can control but few. It is by mora
John Rains (search for this): chapter 19
eted the road with some of his saqueros, with orders to ride forward and warn the general should soldiers appear in his rear. In this event, he and Frazee would have made their way to Mexican territory on horseback. The Federals, however, had no knowledge of the general's departure, and did not follow him. About the 25th of June nearly the whole party had arrived at the rendezvous, where we found the general enjoying himself, though the weather was excessively hot. The ranch was owned by John Rains, Esq., whose major-domo had orders to kill several bullocks, and jerk the meat for our use. This necessitated several additional days of delay, and I think it was the 29th of June, or about that time, when we finally moved away, organized under command of Alonso Ridley, to whom we intrusted the order of marching, etc., etc. The following additional particulars are from a letter of Colonel Ridley. They vary in some unimportant respects from Captain Gift's account: It gives me gre
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