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New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
-perpetrating, however, a great outrage against humanity, in firing into the town filled with women and children, without any notice to have them removed. In the attack the Mounted Rifles charged on the Texans, who with their rifles knocked a few of them from their saddles, when they turned, running over the infantry and producing great confusion in their flight. The major then withdrew. They were thus, I think, wholly demoralized, and that night commenced a disorderly retreat toward New Mexico. Next day they were overtaken by the Texans, and, without the loss of a man, surrendered themselves prisoners of war; that is, the major surrendered them. They certainly were in no condition to resist, though Captain Potter and one or two others protested, Captain — among them. He commanded the rear-guard. Captain Hardiman, a Texan and a good soldier, says, --fled from his company with his squadron before he was within 600 yards of him. Six hundred United States troops, arms, transport
Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
dcastle, for important details in regard to General Johnston's journey through Arizona; and, assured that the spirited narratives of these faithful companions will bwas captain to General Johnston's body-guard, and afterward major of the Third Arizona Regiment. The following is Captain Gift's account of the organization and e us all day, like a line ruled through the immense green meadow (this part of Arizona is very fertile). It was eleven o'clock at night before we reached the spring,oring cliff, gave evidence that one of those sickening tragedies, so common in Arizona before and since, had been enacted here. I was afterward told that the party f the capture of Lynde's command by the Texans under Colonel Baylor: Mesilla, Arizona, August 7, 1861. My dear wife: We arrived at this place on July 28th, threee moment of Baylor's brilliant victory and of the fall of the Federal power in Arizona, linked his coming with auguries of victory. He had safely run the gantlet, i
Chihuahua (Chihuahua, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 19
There was good ground for apprehension, as a cavalry scout had gone ahead of them one day, and, notwithstanding their celerity, had gained on them. They therefore halted about two miles from Picacho, to make such dispositions as prudence dictated. It was determined that, in case they were assailed by an overpowering force, their little column should amuse the enemy, while General Johnston, accompanied by two picked men, should ride for the Mexican frontier, forty miles distant, and to Chihuahua, if necessary. For this purpose, his riding horse and two of Ridley's had been kept in good condition and unsaddled. He now mounted afresh, and took his place, with Mackenzie and Ryerson, who had been selected to accompany him; Ryerson for his familiarity with the country, Mackenzie for his personal devotion to General Johnston, and for the possession of every quality to fit him for such an enterprise. Gift says: Dave Mackenzie was one of the best scouts in America, and one of the
San Antonio (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
your trials Give my love to our dear children. At Mesilla, the party disbanded, most of them taking the stage for San Antonio, and, on by land, to New Orleans. Ridley says: There was a stage from Mesilla to San Antonio, and some of our pSan Antonio, and some of our party availed themselves of it at once. The general, after nearly two weeks unavoidable delay, proceeded by the same conveyance, from El Paso. He did this very reluctantly, and would have remained with us, until the last of the party could start for San Antonio, but for our urging upon him the necessity of getting to Richmond as fast as possible. In his entire forgetfulness of self, lie was ever ready to sacrifice himself and his own interests and desires for others. Among the little incforded us a most comfortable night's lodging. The journey from Los Angeles to Mesilla was 800 miles, and thence to San Antonio, the frontier city of Texas, 700 more. It was made under the burning glare of a July sun, through wastes of shifting
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
, as, being advised of their taking the route to Thorn, our troops could have reached there first. During the early part of the night Captain Moore received a dispatch from Fort Craig, notifying him of his danger. They immediately destroyed their cannon, burned their train, all but eight wagons, mounted their infantry upon the mules, and marched or rather took to flight on the route to Fort Craig, 120 miles above this, I judge, a forlorn-looking band. Thus 250 infantry and dragoons-United States soldiers-saved themselves from the terrible Texans by an ignominious flight. It is due to the Texans to say that they accorded to the prisoners taken in their recent engagement the most honorable terms, and treated them with the greatest consideration, which was acknowledged by their officers in a handsome letter to the commander. Our party arrived all well and animals in good condition, and the best of feeling prevailing. To-morrow we will resume our journey. Great events are
Vallecito (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
enerals, but I knew I had one, and that was Sidney Johnston. Itinerary. 1861. June 16.Left Los Angeles — to Rancho Chino, thirty-five miles. June 22.Arrived at Warner's Ranch. One hundred miles from Los Angeles. June 27.Left Warner's. To Vallecito. June 30.Left Vallecito. Sunday night. Eighteen miles to Carrizo Wells. Comet seen. July 1.Left Carrizo, 3 P. M. Thirty-seven miles to Indian Wells. July 2.Indian Wells at noon. Twenty-eight miles to Alamo Springs. July 3.Alamo Springs atVallecito. Sunday night. Eighteen miles to Carrizo Wells. Comet seen. July 1.Left Carrizo, 3 P. M. Thirty-seven miles to Indian Wells. July 2.Indian Wells at noon. Twenty-eight miles to Alamo Springs. July 3.Alamo Springs at 8 A. M. Thirty miles to Cook's Wells. July 4.Cook's to Yeager's Ferry. (Fort Yuma.) July 7.Yuma, up the Gila, and thence two hundred and seventy miles to Tucson. July 18.Arrived at Tucson. July 22.Left Tucson, 8 A. M. Thirty miles. July 23.Forty miles to a dry camp. July 24.Fifteen miles to Dragoon Springs, thence fifty miles to Apache Pass. July 25. July 26. July 27.From Apache Pass. One hundred and sixty-five miles to the Rio Grande at Picacho, near Mesilla. July 28.To Mesill
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
er. through Texas. anecdotes. the journey summed up. A nation's suspense and joy. Arrival at Richmond. General Johnston remained at Los Angeles from May 2d to June 16th. His letter to Mrs. Gilpetter if he had been in command. I have stood the journey well so far, and expect to get to Richmond in good health. May God preserve you, dear wife, and sustain you in your trials Give my love t the party could start for San Antonio, but for our urging upon him the necessity of getting to Richmond as fast as possible. In his entire forgetfulness of self, lie was ever ready to sacrifice himss may be the services of one man who is equal to the highest command. In his rapid progress to Richmond, General Johnston could not escape a continued ovation. Popular recognition of him as a great telegraph, of course, had announced him; but President Davis was not aware that he had reached Richmond, when he called at the Executive mansion. The President was sick in bed; but, when he heard th
Paraje (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
sked to dance by a lady-he could not refuse. Ridley attributes the escape of Moore and Lord, when they burned their camp at Cook's Spring, and turned off to Fort Craig, to the negligence of the scouts, who did not report the movement for some twenty-four hours. General Johnston's letter, written immediately after these evesed of their taking the route to Thorn, our troops could have reached there first. During the early part of the night Captain Moore received a dispatch from Fort Craig, notifying him of his danger. They immediately destroyed their cannon, burned their train, all but eight wagons, mounted their infantry upon the mules, and marched or rather took to flight on the route to Fort Craig, 120 miles above this, I judge, a forlorn-looking band. Thus 250 infantry and dragoons-United States soldiers-saved themselves from the terrible Texans by an ignominious flight. It is due to the Texans to say that they accorded to the prisoners taken in their recent eng
Whitethorn (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
uch doubted it before. They judged from the disorderly character of their march, and their apparent unconsciousness of danger. The troops were then at Cook's Spring, fifty miles from our camp at the forks of the road to Fort Thorn, fifty miles above here on the river. Our scouts took their position to watch them during the night, and to ascertain in the morning which route they would take. On either there could have been no chance of escape, as, being advised of their taking the route to Thorn, our troops could have reached there first. During the early part of the night Captain Moore received a dispatch from Fort Craig, notifying him of his danger. They immediately destroyed their cannon, burned their train, all but eight wagons, mounted their infantry upon the mules, and marched or rather took to flight on the route to Fort Craig, 120 miles above this, I judge, a forlorn-looking band. Thus 250 infantry and dragoons-United States soldiers-saved themselves from the terrible
Picacho (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
Apache Pass and Cook's Spring. The journey from Cook's Spring to the Rio Grande, some sixty miles, was made without camping. The road led to the river at a point several miles above Mesilla, where was situated the little Mexican village of Picacho, inhabited by poor farmers, whose cornfields lay about the town. Eight miles below Mesilla was Fort Fillmore, with a strong Federal garrison, and it was probable that they would find the road picketed, and troops in the village. There was good ground for apprehension, as a cavalry scout had gone ahead of them one day, and, notwithstanding their celerity, had gained on them. They therefore halted about two miles from Picacho, to make such dispositions as prudence dictated. It was determined that, in case they were assailed by an overpowering force, their little column should amuse the enemy, while General Johnston, accompanied by two picked men, should ride for the Mexican frontier, forty miles distant, and to Chihuahua, if necess
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