hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. S. Johnston 1,542 0 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 865 67 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 578 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 515 3 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 458 0 Browse Search
William Preston Johnston 445 3 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 436 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 404 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 347 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 341 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

Found 463 total hits in 126 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
k Columbus, which, under the circumstances, seems to the writer judicious though apparently bold; but Fremont took no notice of his application. Badeau's Life of Grant, vol. i., p. 13. After the failure of the campaign projected against St. Louis, in the summer of 1861, General Polk turned his attention toward perfecting the river-defenses. Missouri and Arkansas were added to his department, but he was unable to avail himself of these increased powers, as the defense of the Mississippieunions gave me the very highest opinion of his profound judgment. He was a man of stately but winning courtesy, although occasionally indulging in pleasantry. At present I can recall but two of those conversations. One evening we received a St. Louis paper containing a general order of General Fremont, announcing his staff — a numerous body, composed largely of gentlemen with foreign names. As, for instance, General Asboth, Colonel De Alma, Majors Kappner and Blome, Captains Emavic Meiza
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
and in West Tennessee, his department extended from the mouth of the Arkansas River, on both sides of the Mississippi, to the northern limits of Confederate authority, and east as far as the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. For the following account of his services, previous to General Johnston's arrival, I am again indebted to Dr. William M. Polk: The force which he found in his command was mainly composed of a part of the Tennessee State army, together with some few Confederate troops in Mississippi. General Pillow, as the representative of the Tennessee State forces, was in chief command at Memphis; and the credit of all that had been done prior to that time is clearly his. A man of marked energy and executive ability, he was in a position to be of signal service to General Polk in the work that lay before him. Isham G. Harris, the Governor of the State, was in truth a war Governor. Filled with energy and of great ability, he had done much toward organizing an efficient force throu
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
sionary Bishop. Bishop of Louisiana. pecuniary losses. University of the South. Sugar and cotton planting. visit to Richmond. appointed Brigadier-General. the Bishop-soldier. appearance. anecdotes. command in West Tennessee. services. forished his theological education at Alexandria. He was married in May, 1830, and ordained in the Monumental Church, Richmond, Virginia, by Bishop Moore, to whom he became episcopant. To those who remember the stately presence and powerful form of thom the house, beyond the possibility of being overheard by any one, and remarked to me: Colonel, you may desire to go to Richmond; I called you here to tell you that there is no need at present of your remaining with me; for a long time to come there he enter on a campaign in Missouri. I accompanied him a part of the way toward Bowling Green, and then went on to Richmond, Virginia. While he was not a martinet, his enforcement of discipline was admirable, and yet extremely quiet. When he re
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
virtue of early training, and a bold, aggressive spirit, every inch a soldier. General Polk's great services, his close public and private relations with the subject of this memoir, his anomalous position as bishop and general, and the wide misapprehension of his life and character by those who knew only one side or the other, warrant a more extended notice. Leonidas Polk was descended from a family noted in our Revolutionary annals. It came from the north of Ireland about 1722, to Maryland; and about 1753, Thomas, the son of William Polk, found a congenial home in the Scotch-Irish settlement of Mecklenburg County, in the province of North Carolina. Here he married and prospered, attaining wealth and eminence among his people. It may be recollected that for Mecklenburg County is claimed the honor of making the first Declaration of Independence from the mother-country. According to the historian of these events, Colonel Thomas Polk convoked the meeting that took this first s
Washington, Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
sources, and afterward had parted so widely, moved thereafter with a common purpose to a common end. Their friendship was founded upon mutual esteem. When General Polk came from Europe, he brought with him a beautiful onyx cameo — the head of Washington — which he gave to General Johnston on his return, saying: I could find nothing so appropriate as a present for you; for I have never known any one whose character so closely resembled Washington's in all respects as your own. A very dear frieWashington's in all respects as your own. A very dear friend confirms this view of General Johnston thus: Did you ever see Jefferson's estimate of the character of Washington? It is better than the best for General Johnston. When General Polk took command in West Tennessee, his department extended from the mouth of the Arkansas River, on both sides of the Mississippi, to the northern limits of Confederate authority, and east as far as the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. For the following account of his services, previous to General Johnston's arrival, I
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
into consideration in deciding on his military operations. This was one of the many incidents which showed me that he was a complete general; for, while no true soldier will permit any merely political influences around him, yet an able commander should always take into consideration, and be minutely and accurately informed of, the condition, resources, etc., of the country in which he operates. At that time General Johnston contemplated a campaign in Missouri, General Price having taken Lexington about that time, and Fremont being the Federal commander in this State. I accepted the position on his staff with the understanding that I should not be expected to serve on it, except in such a campaign. We both thought my position, as Lieutenant-Governor of Missouri, might lead to misconstruction of my course, should I serve in any other State. The Missouri Unionists, we believed, would endeavor to dampen the hopes of the Confederate element in the State, by representing that the seco
Sewanee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
as increased by this concentration of effort. A series of providential visitations, not necessary to be recounted here, had crippled Bishop Polk's large estate; but his pecuniary losses neither shook his earnest faith nor abated his hope and zeal in all good works. The chief business of Bishop Polk's life for five or six years before the war, though not to the detriment of his duties as bishop, was in developing the plan and procuring the endowment of the University of the South, at Sewanee, on the Cumberland Mountains, in Tennessee. He secured 5,000 acres of land, and subscriptions for $400,000, and gave the start to an institution which is now doing a very useful work, and has before it a career of most excellent promise, but which he designed making second to none in this country — a place where Southern youth could obtain all those advantages of the higher university education which they were then seeking at the North or abroad. The building up of this institution had no
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ive operations in Missouri by a combined movement of the armies of Price, McCulloch, Hardee, and Pillow, aided by Jeff Thompson's irregular command. It has already been seen that this plan failed thrs Polk and Pillow felt the pressing necessity for the occupation of Columbus, and on August 28th Pillow wrote to Polk urging its immediate seizure. This had been Polk's own view for some time, but ororks were begun there. His design now was to make that the advanced point of defense-holding Fort Pillow as a position to fall back upon, in the event he was driven to it. With those two points thor the Missouri shore at that point, and thus obstructing river navigation below No. 10; while Fort Pillow was to form the last stronghold in the chain. Most of the winter was spent in strengthening was put on No. 10 and New Madrid; so that when the time came to occupy them, they, as well as Fort Pillow, were in a proper state of defense. General Polk's share in this campaign will appear as
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
er in the War of the Revolution, and rose to the rank of brigadier-general in the State forces. William Polk, his eldest son, then a lad not seventeen years old, left college in April, 1775, to become a lieutenant in the South Carolina line. He was actively engaged to the end of the war, toward the close as lieutenant-colonel, and was twice desperately wounded, once in the shoulder and again in the mouth. In 1783, he was made Surveyor-General of Middle Tennessee, and removed to where Nashville now stands. He returned, however, to North Carolina, where he held various honorable and important trusts, and died at Raleigh in 1834, aged seventy-six years. Like his father, he was a fine type of that sturdy and tenacious Scotch-Irish stock which knows so well how to subdue the opposing forces of Nature and man, and to maintain its rights against all odds. Leonidas Polk was the fourth son of Colonel William Polk, and was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, April 10, 1806. He was an a
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Jeff Thompson's irregular command. It has already been seen that this plan failed through want of cooperation. Both Generals Polk and Pillow felt the pressing necessity for the occupation of Columbus, and on August 28th Pillow wrote to Polk urging its immediate seizure. This had been Polk's own view for some time, but orders from the War Department had restrained him. It was only, therefore, when an hour's delay might have proved fatal, and when it was too late to prevent the seizure of Paducah by the Federals, that General Polk felt justified in exceeding his instructions, and thus disturbing the pretended neutrality of Kentucky. The Secretary of War and Governor Harris both remonstrated; but President Davis replied to his explanations, Necessity justifies your action. Polk was rapidly fortifying, when General Johnston arrived at Columbus. About this time, September 10th, Grant wrote to Fremont, proposing to attack Columbus, which, under the circumstances, seems to the writer
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...