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roops. Federal troops. design of advance. delay. advance. battle of the trenches. apathy of defenders. gunboat disabled. death of Dixon. battle of the gunboats. repulse. important order. authority and responsibility. a quiet day. abortive sortie. divided counsels. Federal reenforcements. exaggerated reports. discouragement. sortie agreed on. battle of Dover. the attack. Federal strength. well-matched antagonists. fight on the left. Brown's assault. Hanson's assault. Wynn's road cleared. cessation of conflict. the critical moment. recall of troops. Grant's advance. Grant and Smith. assault by Federal left. capture of Outwork. close of battle. losses.;, Confederate victory telegraphed. sortie planned. Forrest's reconnaissance. Council of War. discussion of surrender. escape of Floyd and Pillow. the breaking-up. prisoners. surrender. consequences. terms of surrender. Confederate strength and losses. Federal strength and losses. value of the
advance. Thayer's brigade formed, under the direction of General Lew Wallace, as described, at right angles to the intrenchments. The First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, and the Fifty-eighth Illinois, were on the right; Wood's battery in the centre ; and to the left, a detached company and the Fifty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Steadman, the left of the line being obliquely retired so as to front an approach from the trenches. The line of reserve consisted of the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Colonel Woods; the Forty-sixth Illinois, Colonel Davis; and the Fifty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Baldwin. Cruft reestablished his line on the right of Thayer. It was now one o'clock. The Federal right was doubled back. The Wynn's Ferry road was cleared, and it only remained for the Confederates to do one of two things. The first was, to seize the golden moment, and, adhering to the original purpose and plan of the sortie, move off rapidly by the route laid open by such strenuous efforts and so
her Confederate advance. Thayer's brigade formed, under the direction of General Lew Wallace, as described, at right angles to the intrenchments. The First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, and the Fifty-eighth Illinois, were on the right; Wood's battery in the centre ; and to the left, a detached company and the Fifty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Steadman, the left of the line being obliquely retired so as to front an approach from the trenches. The line of reserve consisted of the Seventy-six Colms's battalion. Quarles's regiment, the Forty-second Tennessee, also came up from Heiman's position, and helped Hanson defend the second line. In this last engagement, while Smith was attacking with Lauman's brigade, the Twelfth Iowa, Colonel Wood, and the Fiftieth Illinois, Colonel Bane, of Cook's brigade, also joined in the attack on his immediate right; and Morgan L. Smith's brigade farther still to the right. These were all fresh troops. Besides these, Cruft's brigade, part of Tha
he intrenchments, which inflicted upon the assailant a considerable loss, and almost silenced his fire late in the afternoon. My loss during the day was thirty-nine in killed and wounded. Heiman's position has already been described. A salient to the Confederate centre, it was the most elevated and advanced point on the line. Here was posted his brigade: the Tenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel McGavock; the Forty-eighth Tennessee, Colonel Voorhies; the Fifty-third Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Winston; the Twenty-seventh Alabama, Colonel Hughes; and Maney's light battery-in all about 1,700 strong. Badeau says of the Federal operations: Skirmishers were thrown out actively in front, and several smart fights occurred, but with no result of importance. They were in no case intended for real assaults, but simply as attempts to discover the force and position of the enemy, and to establish the national line. An attempt was made by McClernand to capture the ridge-road on whic
John A. Wharton (search for this): chapter 32
rgency, and led forward his troops, the Thirty-sixth Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid, and the Fiftieth Virginia, Major Thorburn, and formed on Baldwin's right. Wharton's brigade, the Fifty-first Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Massie, and the Fifty-sixth Virginia, Captain Daviess, also moved up to the left, on very bad ground, whicd Drake's brigades, while Forrest's cavalry covered their flank, and forced their horses through the thick undergrowth. Simonton pushed in between McCausland and Wharton, arrayed in the following order from right to left: the Third Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Webb; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; and First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton. To the left of Wharton, Drake put into action his brigade — the Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of the Twenty-sixth Alabama, under Major Garvin; and a Tennessee battalion, under Colonel Browder. As was said, Forrest suppo
Indian Wells (search for this): chapter 32
ead; and to his left, on the adjoining eminence, Drake's brigade was posted in the following order: Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; four pieces of light artillery, Captain French; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of Alabama Battalion, Major Garvin; and the Tennessee Battalion, Colonel Browder. The brigade organization was not preserved regularly beyond this point. The next commands in order were the Fifty-first Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Massie; Third Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells; first division of Green's battery, Captain Green; four pieces of light artillery, Captain Guy; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; Fifty-sixth Virginia, Captain Daviess; First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton; second division of Green's battery, Lieutenant Perkins; Twenty-sixth Mississippi, Colonel Reynolds. Besides the Forty-second Tennessee, already mentioned, the Twentieth Mississippi, Thirty-sixth Virginia, and Twenty-sixth Tennessee
James Webb (search for this): chapter 32
aged by the confusion in the Southern line, and hoping to profit by it, were now advancing. In the mean time, Brigadier General Johnson was leading into action still farther to the left, and consequently over greater spaces, Simonton's and Drake's brigades, while Forrest's cavalry covered their flank, and forced their horses through the thick undergrowth. Simonton pushed in between McCausland and Wharton, arrayed in the following order from right to left: the Third Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Webb; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; and First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton. To the left of Wharton, Drake put into action his brigade — the Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of the Twenty-sixth Alabama, under Major Garvin; and a Tennessee battalion, under Colonel Browder. As was said, Forrest supported the extreme left flank. In this disposition of the forces, the right of Pillow's wing
W. H. L. Wallace (search for this): chapter 32
valry-companies. The Second Brigade, Colonel W. H. L. Wallace, included the Eleventh, Twentieth, Folesby at 3,130, and of McArthur at 1,395. Colonel Wallace reported 3,400 effectives of all arms. Ant. Oglesby's brigade on the right, and W. H. L. Wallace's, next to it, moved to the right, along was another. The facts are these : As Wallace was moving to the right, McClernand detached r to receive him-most probably the men of W. H. L. Wallace's brigade, who became engaged about sevennto position about ten o'clock, and found W. H. L. Wallace retiring in comparatively good order. Buartly in column. In his front was massed W. H. L. Wallace's brigade, with two heavy batteries. Betelivering well-directed volleys. Here W. H. L. Wallace's brigade still clung to their second posnot fled. While Hanson was thus assailing Wallace's front, Buckner continued the movement againdisordered, but undismayed. Indeed, not only Wallace's command, but squads from all the others, ra[1 more...]
W. H. Wallace (search for this): chapter 32
enches; and, as each command took its position to the left, it was by a larger circuit, and with a proportionate loss of time. On the Federal side, McClernand's whole division engaged this line as it advanced. Oglesby's brigade — the Eighth, Eighteenth, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Illinois, two batteries, and four companies of cavalry-received the first shock, on its left. McArthur's brigade — the Seventeenth and Forty-ninth Illinois-next became engaged; and, finally, W. H. Wallace's brigade — the Eleventh, Twentieth, Forty-fifth, and Forty-eighth Illinois, the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, Taylor's First Illinois Artillery, and McAllister's battery — on Oglesby's left. According to the data of Appendix B to this chapter, McClernand's division was about 8,500 strong of all arms. The attacking Confederate left wing, according to the writer's estimate, was composed of five small brigades of infantry, 5,360 strong, and about 1,000 cavalry. Jordan, in his Life of Forres
Lew Wallace (search for this): chapter 32
sions were soon added the Third, commanded by General Lew Wallace, with Colonels Cruft and Thayer as brigade coand occupied the Federal right, Smith the left, and Wallace the centre. It is extremely difficult to arrive0,000 strong or more. These were assigned to General Lew Wallace, who had also brought over the troops from Foas McClernand's messages became more urgent, General Lew Wallace, commanding the central division, finding hime did somewhat broken, but in good order. General Lew Wallace says, in his report: Soon fugitives froon by the right flank. He promptly obeyed. General Wallace acted with vigor and decision. Meeting McClernayer's brigade formed, under the direction of General Lew Wallace, as described, at right angles to the intrencfield, and, after holding at bay for an hour or two Wallace's division, with the remnants of McClernand's, sloweed to the heavy firing on his right, which, like Lew Wallace, he mistook for an attack by McClernand. As he r
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