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es. McClernand's first brigade, commanded by Colonel Oglesby, was formed of the Eighth, Eighteenth, Twenty-n, Appendix, p. 34. reports the infantry strength of Oglesby at 3,130, and of McArthur at 1,395. Colonel Wallaceted 3,400 effectives of all arms. Add to this, for Oglesby, cavalry and artillery, 500, and we have the streng the Eighth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Rhodes, of Oglesby's brigade, advancing in line of battle, encounteredather, and might have broken up the expedition. Oglesby's brigade was deployed and moved forward through th artillery opened from every hill along the front. Oglesby's brigade on the right, and W. H. L. Wallace's, nes whole division engaged this line as it advanced. Oglesby's brigade — the Eighth, Eighteenth, Twenty-ninth, Tt Illinois Artillery, and McAllister's battery — on Oglesby's left. According to the data of Appendix B to thiront, and Buckner on their left. By the retreat of Oglesby and McArthur, they had become the salient of the Fe
ley, was the Thirtieth Tennessee, Colonel Head; and to his left, on the adjoining eminence, Drake's brigade was posted in the following order: Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; four pieces of light artillery, Captain French; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of Alabama Battalion, Major Garvin; and the Tennessee Battalion, Colonel Browder. The brigade organization was not preserved regularly beyond this point. The next commands in order were the Fifty-first Virginia, Lieutenant-Col; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; and First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton. To the left of Wharton, Drake put into action his brigade — the Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of the Twenty-sixth Alabama, under Major Garvin; and a Tennessee battalion, under Colonel Browder. As was said, Forrest supported the extreme left flank. In this disposition of the forces, the right of Pillow's wing rested on
Wharton J. Green (search for this): chapter 32
nd this point. The next commands in order were the Fifty-first Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Massie; Third Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells; first division of Green's battery, Captain Green; four pieces of light artillery, Captain Guy; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; Fifty-sixth VirginiaCaptain Green; four pieces of light artillery, Captain Guy; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; Fifty-sixth Virginia, Captain Daviess; First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton; second division of Green's battery, Lieutenant Perkins; Twenty-sixth Mississippi, Colonel Reynolds. Besides the Forty-second Tennessee, already mentioned, the Twentieth Mississippi, Thirty-sixth Virginia, and Twenty-sixth Tennessee, were also held in reserve. The Green's battery, Lieutenant Perkins; Twenty-sixth Mississippi, Colonel Reynolds. Besides the Forty-second Tennessee, already mentioned, the Twentieth Mississippi, Thirty-sixth Virginia, and Twenty-sixth Tennessee, were also held in reserve. The Fiftieth Virginia was also in position on the left; as was Browder's battalion (Fifty-first Tennessee). The Forty-ninth Tennessee, Colonel Bailey, and the Fiftieth, Colonel Sugg, with Colms's Tennessee Battalion, were assigned as a garrison to the fort — in all, some 700 or 800 strong. The heavy artillery was served by details
mate, was composed of five small brigades of infantry, 5,360 strong, and about 1,000 cavalry. Jordan, in his Life of Forrest, puts the cavalry at 800. Appendix A will show the grounds for this estimate. The antagonists were well matched in courage, confidence, and pride of prowess. Usually one or the other of two opponents promptly perceives to which side the scales of victory incline. In extreme peril, all the senses and perceptions of brave men are quickened; and, as the Greeks at Salamis saw their guardian goddess hovering over them, so some subtile instinct seems to say to men, This is the moment of your fate-press on --or-yield. As Macbeth says of Banquo: There is none but he Whose being I do fear: and under him My genius is rebuked; as, it is said, Mark Antony's was by Caesar. But these hardy soldiers, kindred in blood, equally emulous of glory, and, like the Roman twins, jealous of the birthright and preeminence of valor, saw nothing in any foe to quell the hope o
Zachary Taylor (search for this): chapter 32
s of time. On the Federal side, McClernand's whole division engaged this line as it advanced. Oglesby's brigade — the Eighth, Eighteenth, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Illinois, two batteries, and four companies of cavalry-received the first shock, on its left. McArthur's brigade — the Seventeenth and Forty-ninth Illinois-next became engaged; and, finally, W. H. Wallace's brigade — the Eleventh, Twentieth, Forty-fifth, and Forty-eighth Illinois, the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, Taylor's First Illinois Artillery, and McAllister's battery — on Oglesby's left. According to the data of Appendix B to this chapter, McClernand's division was about 8,500 strong of all arms. The attacking Confederate left wing, according to the writer's estimate, was composed of five small brigades of infantry, 5,360 strong, and about 1,000 cavalry. Jordan, in his Life of Forrest, puts the cavalry at 800. Appendix A will show the grounds for this estimate. The antagonists were well matche
or the other of two opponents promptly perceives to which side the scales of victory incline. In extreme peril, all the senses and perceptions of brave men are quickened; and, as the Greeks at Salamis saw their guardian goddess hovering over them, so some subtile instinct seems to say to men, This is the moment of your fate-press on --or-yield. As Macbeth says of Banquo: There is none but he Whose being I do fear: and under him My genius is rebuked; as, it is said, Mark Antony's was by Caesar. But these hardy soldiers, kindred in blood, equally emulous of glory, and, like the Roman twins, jealous of the birthright and preeminence of valor, saw nothing in any foe to quell the hope of final triumph. Each side believed that the fierce assault or stubborn stand was proof that the weight of numbers was with the foe; but, nothing daunted, trusted to manhood for success. As has been seen, when Baldwin first struck the enemy, instead of encountering pickets or skirmishers, he found
John W. Morton (search for this): chapter 32
maining section of Porter's battery, delayed in the same way, was brought into position by Lieutenant Morton, under a very heavy fire, and with the other guns continued firing until nightfall. It wa, he exclaimed, as Jordan has it, to the only unwounded officer left with his battery, Lieutenant John W. Morton, a mere lad of nineteen, Don't let them have the guns, Morton! Lieutenant Morton replMorton! Lieutenant Morton replied, No, captain, not while I have one man left! This battery, from its advanced and exposed position, lost eight men killed outright, and twenty-five wounded, out of forty-eight officers, non-commLieutenant Morton replied, No, captain, not while I have one man left! This battery, from its advanced and exposed position, lost eight men killed outright, and twenty-five wounded, out of forty-eight officers, non-commissioned officers, and men, actively engaged; the balance of the company, forty-two men, were drivers, teamsters, and artificers, protected in a ravine at some distance from the battery. Captain in 1869. He was a kind and cultivated gentleman, and a gallant soldier. His young lieutenant, Morton, before the close of the war became chief of artillery to General Forrest. Darkness separate
John C. Brown (search for this): chapter 32
l strength. well-matched antagonists. fight on the left. Brown's assault. Hanson's assault. Wynn's road cleared. cessatassable stream, called Hickman Creek. Buckner had with him Brown's brigade and part of Baldwin's, the rest of that brigade ber. Those of his regiments which remained were attached to Brown's brigade. Buckner gave his presence and supervision to therve of the Fourteenth Mississippi was held as its support; Brown's, Cook's, and Farquharson's regiments were on the left; Grestimated the force there at from 12,000 to 15,000 men. General Brown, General Palmer, and some other intelligent Tennesseean The advance of this column was first discovered by Colonel John C. Brown, who notified Colonel Heiman. Brown ordered the baBrown ordered the batteries of Graves and Porter to open upon the column, which they did with great effect, contributing materially to the repuls right. My command, to which the Twentieth Mississippi, Major Brown, was temporarily attached, constituted the advance, in t
Morgan L. Smith (search for this): chapter 32
illery, 500, and we have the strength of this division, 8,425 men (see Appendix B to this chapter). Smith's brigades were commanded by Colonels J. G. Lauman, Morgan L. Smith, and J. Cook. Lauman had the Second, Seventh, and Fourteenth Iowa; the Twenty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Indiana; Birge's regiment of sharp-shooters, and Stone's Missouri Battery. M. L. Smith had the Eighth Missouri and Eleventh Indiana; and Cook had the Seventh and Fiftieth Illinois, the Twelfth Iowa, the Fifty-second Indiana, and the Thirteenth Missouri. To these divisions were soon added the Third, commanded by General Lew Wallace, with Colonels Cruft and Thayer as brigade commanden's brigade, the Twelfth Iowa, Colonel Wood, and the Fiftieth Illinois, Colonel Bane, of Cook's brigade, also joined in the attack on his immediate right; and Morgan L. Smith's brigade farther still to the right. These were all fresh troops. Besides these, Cruft's brigade, part of Thayer's, and other commands, joined in the attac
Wells; first division of Green's battery, Captain Green; four pieces of light artillery, Captain Guy; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; Fifty-sixth Virginia, Captain Daviess; First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton; second division of Green's battery, Lieutenant Perkins; Twenty-sixth Mion, arrayed in the following order from right to left: the Third Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Webb; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; and First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton. To the left of Wharton, Drake put into action his brigade — the Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; Fifteent Federal fire. Robert Slaughter's company, of the Eighth Kentucky, charged straight up on two pieces of artillery and suffered severely, but the guns were taken. Gregg's Texans met heavy losses near the top of the same hill. Here fell the brave Lieutenant-Colonel Clough and Lieutenant Nowland near together. The First Mississipp
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