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Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 32
y artillery was served by details from the infantry regiments Bidwell's company of the Thirtieth Tennessee, and Beaumont's of the Fiftieth Tennessee. and light artillery. Ross's company, 116 strong. Captain Stankiewitz had about twenty-five men in the field-work, with some light pieces. Forrest commanded all the cavalry-his own regiment, Gantt's Tennessee Battalion, and three or four small companies-altogether 800 or 1,000 strong. He had arrived with his regiment only on the 10th. Scott's Louisiana Cavalry Regiment was in observation on the right bank of the Cumberland. The aggregate of this force has been variously stated. General Johnston estimated it at 17,000, thus: Garrisons of Henry and Donelson5,000 Floyd's and Buckner's command8,000 Pillow's, from Clarksville2,000 Clark's, from Hopkinsville2,000 17,000 To these must be added Polk's reinforcements, not included in Tilghman's returns-1,600 men-making 18,600 men. The generals commanding at Donelson est
nd Twenty-sixth Tennessee, were also held in reserve. The Fiftieth Virginia was also in position on the left; as was Browder's battalion (Fifty-first Tennessee). The Forty-ninth Tennessee, Colonel Bailey, and the Fiftieth, Colonel Sugg, with Colms's Tennessee Battalion, were assigned as a garrison to the fort — in all, some 700 or 800 strong. The heavy artillery was served by details from the infantry regiments Bidwell's company of the Thirtieth Tennessee, and Beaumont's of the Fiftiecky. A brisk fire was kept up until sunset, when the firing ceased. A battalion of Sugg's regiment reached the field just before the close of the fight, and deployed to the right of the Forty-ninth. The right wing was likewise reinforced by Major Colms's battalion. Quarles's regiment, the Forty-second Tennessee, also came up from Heiman's position, and helped Hanson defend the second line. In this last engagement, while Smith was attacking with Lauman's brigade, the Twelfth Iowa, Colone
her Confederate advance. Thayer's brigade formed, under the direction of General Lew Wallace, as described, at right angles to the intrenchments. The First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, and the Fifty-eighth Illinois, were on the right; Wood's battery in the centre ; and to the left, a detached company and the Fifty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Steadman, the left of the line being obliquely retired so as to front an approach from the trenches. The line of reserve consisted of the Seventy-six Colms's battalion. Quarles's regiment, the Forty-second Tennessee, also came up from Heiman's position, and helped Hanson defend the second line. In this last engagement, while Smith was attacking with Lauman's brigade, the Twelfth Iowa, Colonel Wood, and the Fiftieth Illinois, Colonel Bane, of Cook's brigade, also joined in the attack on his immediate right; and Morgan L. Smith's brigade farther still to the right. These were all fresh troops. Besides these, Cruft's brigade, part of Tha
her heedlessly, on the extreme right, and attempted to stem the tide of battle, was broken into fragments by the onset, and became hopelessly involved in the crowd of fugitives. Cruft bore the brunt of battle for some time; but, at length, he, too, had to give back, which he did somewhat broken, but in good order. General Lew Wallace says, in his report: Soon fugitives from the battle came crowding up the hill, in rear of my own line, bringing unmistakable signs of disaster. Captain Rawlins was conversing with me at the time, when a mounted officer galloped down the road, shouting: We are cut to pieces! The effect was very perceptible. To prevent a panic among the regiments of my Third Brigade, I ordered Colonel Thayer to move on by the right flank. He promptly obeyed. General Wallace acted with vigor and decision. Meeting McClernand's whole division in full retreat, with Cruft also falling back, he threw forward Thayer's strong brigade, to receive the combined at
ubbornly held the ground, it looked for a long time as if the effort would prove abortive. In carrying the first hill, Simonton's brigade, separated from the troops on its right, received the full force of the Federal fire. Robert Slaughter's company, of the Eighth Kentucky, charged straight up on two pieces of artillery and suffered severely, but the guns were taken. Gregg's Texans met heavy losses near the top of the same hill. Here fell the brave Lieutenant-Colonel Clough and Lieutenant Nowland near together. The First Mississippi greatly distinguished itself; and the Virginians to their left planted their colors on the crest, which they carried by the most unflinching resolution. At length, however, the Confederate left so established its line as to turn the right flank of the Federals, and, by an almost simultaneous assault along its whole length, between nine and ten o'clock, forced the position that had been so well maintained by an enveloping movement, and crushed M
Indian Wells (search for this): chapter 32
ead; and to his left, on the adjoining eminence, Drake's brigade was posted in the following order: Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; four pieces of light artillery, Captain French; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of Alabama Battalion, Major Garvin; and the Tennessee Battalion, Colonel Browder. The brigade organization was not preserved regularly beyond this point. The next commands in order were the Fifty-first Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Massie; Third Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells; first division of Green's battery, Captain Green; four pieces of light artillery, Captain Guy; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; Fifty-sixth Virginia, Captain Daviess; First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton; second division of Green's battery, Lieutenant Perkins; Twenty-sixth Mississippi, Colonel Reynolds. Besides the Forty-second Tennessee, already mentioned, the Twentieth Mississippi, Thirty-sixth Virginia, and Twenty-sixth Tennessee
ennessee, came up, in reserve to this brigade. To the left of Heiman, in the valley, was the Thirtieth Tennessee, Colonel Head; and to his left, on the adjoining eminence, Drake's brigade was posted in the following order: Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; four pieces of light artillery, Captain French; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of Alabama Battalion, Major Garvin; and the Tennessee Battalion, Colonel Browder. The brigade organization was not preserved regularly beyond thississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Webb; Eighth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg; and First Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton. To the left of Wharton, Drake put into action his brigade — the Fourth Mississippi, Major Adair; Fifteenth Arkansas, Colonel Gee; two companies of the Twenty-sixth Alabama, under Major Garvin; and a Tennessee battalion, under Colonel Browder. As was said, Forrest supported the extreme left flank. In this disposition of the forces, the
he sent for aid. Grant was absent, at the river, with Foote; and as McClernand's messages became more urgent, General Lew Wallace, commanding the central division, finding himself unoccupied in front, moved Cruft's brigade up to the right, ill support of the retreating Federals. Cruft's brigade was composed of four regiments — the Thirty-first Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Osborn; Seventeenth Kentucky, Colonel McHenry; Twenty-fifth Kentucky, Colonel Shackleford; and Forty-fourth Indiana, Colonel Reed--in all about 2,300 strong. They came into position about ten o'clock, and found W. H. L. Wallace retiring in comparatively good order. But the regiments farther to their right were badly broken. The Twenty-fifth Kentucky, which was carried forward rather heedlessly, on the extreme right, and attempted to stem the tide of battle, was broken into fragments by the onset, and became hopelessly involved in the crowd of fugitives. Cruft bore the brunt of battle for some time; but, at lengt
Joseph H. Dixon (search for this): chapter 32
n behind a headland, she threw 138 shots, until a 128-pound shot came crashing through one of her ports, injuring her machinery, and sending her off crippled. No damage was done to the fort, except that a shot disabled a gun, and killed Captain Joseph H. Dixon, a valuable young engineer, whose name has been mentioned in connection with the fortification of the place. Educated, enthusiastic, and full of talents and purpose, his loss was generally deplored. Thus far the weather had been warnow United States Senator from Tennessee, commanded the garrison. It was in bad plight from cold, hunger, and protracted watching, but was resolute in spirit. Captain Culbertson, a West Point graduate, commanded the artillery after the death of Dixon. Under him were Captains Ross, Bidwell, and Beaumont, who commanded the batteries. Stankiewitz, a gallant Pole, had two six-pounders and an eight-inch howitzer on the hill. They held their fire, under Pillow's orders, until the boats came with
e of the enemy, but was rallied and formed fifty yards to the rear. The Twenty-sixth Tennessee, Colonel Lillard, formed on its left, across the road; and the Twentieth Mississippi advanced on the left of the Twenty-sixth Tennessee, through an open field, where it was exposed to a destructive fire, which it could not return. McCausland,--supporting Baldwin, perceived the emergency, and led forward his troops, the Thirty-sixth Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid, and the Fiftieth Virginia, Major Thorburn, and formed on Baldwin's right. Wharton's brigade, the Fifty-first Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Massie, and the Fifty-sixth Virginia, Captain Daviess, also moved up to the left, on very bad ground, which they held tenaciously. These brigades were just in time to check the Illinois troops, who, encouraged by the confusion in the Southern line, and hoping to profit by it, were now advancing. In the mean time, Brigadier General Johnson was leading into action still farther to the lef
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