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January 3rd (search for this): chapter 32
enry. Badeau says, This was the first mention of Fort Donelson, whether in conversation or dispatches, between the two commanders. This statement is erroneous. Halleck telegraphed Buell, January 31st: I have ordered an advance on Fort Henry and _Dover. It will be made immediately. He frequently calls Fort Donelson Dover. He also says, February 2d, It is only proposed to take and occupy Fort Henry and Dover, etc. Buell, however, had recommended the same movement to Halleck, as early as January 3d, and had already voluntarily started thirteen regiments to aid Grant in it. Halleck was also sending reinforcements, and he replied to Grant on the 8th: Some of the gunboats from Fort Holt will be sent up. Reinforcements will reach you daily. Hold on to Fort Henry at all hazards. Impress slaves, if necessary, to strengthen your position as rapidly as possible. On the 10th he again promised large reinforcements. Grant was not able to make good his promise. His biographer attr
causing her to leak badly, and it is probable she will sink before morning. Another entered the Carondelet, killing four men and wounding eight others. Commodore Foote tells me that he has commanded at the taking of six forts, and has been in several naval engagements, but he never was under so severe a fire before. Fifty-seven shots struck his vessel, his upper works were riddled, and his lower decks strewed with the dead and wounded. Howison's History (Southern Literary Messenger, 1862), p. 323. Hoppin says (page 223): The Louisville was disabled by a shot, which cut away her rudder-chains, making her totally unmanageable, so that she drifted with the current out of action. Very soon the St. Louis was disabled by a shot through her pilothouse, rendering her steering impossible, so that she also floated down the river. The other two armored vessels were also terribly struck, and a rifled cannon on the Carondelet burst, so that these two could no longer sustain th
operations: Skirmishers were thrown out actively in front, and several smart fights occurred, but with no result of importance. They were in no case intended for real assaults, but simply as attempts to discover the force and position of the enemy, and to establish the national line. An attempt was made by McClernand to capture the ridge-road on which Grant moved, but this was without orders, and unsuccessful, though gallantly made; three regiments were engaged in the affair. On the first two days Grant lost about 300 men in killed and wounded. The assault by Smith on Buckner was one of these smart fights; that of McClernand on Heiman was another. The facts are these : As Wallace was moving to the right, McClernand detached Colonel Hayne, with his regiment, the Forty-eighth Illinois, to support McAllister's battery, and giving him, in addition, the Seventeenth Illinois, Major Smith, and the Forty-ninth Illinois, Colonel Morrison, ordered him to storm Heiman's posi
August 31st, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 32
ere not accessible to the writer when this memoir was prepared, he has no means of verifying the statements made by Federal writers. He gives such data as he has. In a memorandum furnished Hon. Montgomery Blair by the War Department, for the information of the writer, General Grant's effective force at Donelson is placed at about 24,400. In a memorandum furnished the writer by the War Department (see Appendix, Chapter XXXI.), it is placed at 27,113. General Buell, in his letter of August 31, 1865, published in the New York World, September 5, 1865, estimates the reinforcements sent by him to Grant at 10,000 men, and Grant's force at from 30,000 to 35,000. Badeau says: On the last day of the fight Grant had 27,000 men, whom he could have put into battle; some few regiments of these were not engaged. Other reenforcements arrived on the 16th, after the surrender, swelling his number still further. In this estimate no account is taken of the cooperating naval forces,
ll. Floyd was sent to Russellville, with orders to protect the railroad line from Bowling Green to Clarksville. It was added: He must judge from after-information whether he shall march straight upon the enemy, now reported at South Carrollton, or wait for further developments of his intention. It is sufficient to say, he must get the best information of the movements of the enemy southward from the river, and beat them at the earliest favorable opportunity. Toward the close of January, General Pillow, who had been for some time sick in Nashville, was placed in command at Clarksville. On February 6th Brigadier-General Bushrod R. Johnson was placed in command at Fort Donelson. Next day, on account of the attack at Fort Henry, Pillow was ordered to move from Clarksville, with all the troops there, to Donelson, and assume command. Brigadier-General Clark was also charged to move at once from Hopkinsville to Clarksville with his command, something over 2,000 men; and Floy
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