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Stevenson (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
of the commanding officer. Island No.10 and Fort Pillow will likewise be defended to the last extremity, aided also by Hollins's gunboats, which will then retire to the vicinity of Memphis, where another bold stand will be made. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, General C. S. A. (Signed) W. J. Hardee, Major-General. A true copy: S. W. Ferguson, Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. This plan of campaign embraced the defense of the line of the Cumberland, if possible; or, if not, then a retreat to Stevenson. Beauregard was to fall back southward with Polk's army, leaving a small garrison at Columbus. The immediate evacuation of Bowling Green was now inevitable. His correspondence has already made manifest that General Johnston regarded his stay at Bowling Green as a mere question of time, unless he should be promptly reinforced by a strong and well-organized corps. The defenses at Bowling Green, originally slight, had been greatly enlarged by the addition of a cordon of detached forts, m
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Munford's account. John C. Brown. preparations for retreat. protests of the Kentuckians. Colonel Woolley's account of General Johnston's work at Bowling Green. evacuation of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munford's account. panic and mob. Floyd. retreat. Forrest. Governor Harris. letter to the Secretary of War. Forts Henry and Donelson had fallen, and the great water highways were opened to Nashville and to North Alabama. This gave access to the rear of the Confederate armies, and turned the positions both at Bowling Green and Columbus. Of course, such misfortunes could not happen in his department without subjecting General Johnston to the severest criticism, and we shall presently see to what heights of excitement and depths of bitterness the tide of feeling ran. That mighty surge of wrath belonged to the hour, but it has left its mark on the military history of the times, and in the criticism which
Sewanee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
d soldier, who published during the war, at Columbia, South Carolina, an edition of Marmont's Spirit of military institutions, with valuable annotations pertinent to the times, illustrates Chapter III. of Part IV. of that work, which describes the picture of a general who answers to all the requirements of the command, by a review of the life and character of General Johnston. Colonel Schaller has for several years been Professor of Modern Languages at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. He begins his brief but appreciative memoir as follows : Two foreign officers in the service of the Confederate States were ordered to report for duty to General Albert Sidney Johnston in the month of October, 1861. When leaving his headquarters at Bowling Green, in the State of Kentucky, having then seen and spoken with him for the first time, they simultaneously exclaimed, when outside of the inclosure of the unpretending quarters: He is the very beau-ideal of a general. To
Barren river (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
nse to hold at bay the heavy odds in his front until reinforced. If anything is evinced in this biography, it is that General Johnston possessed that admirable equilibrium of judgment-boldness combined with caution — which fitted him to hold a desperate position to the last extremity, and yet to apprehend distinctly when it could be defended no longer, and retire from it in time. Early in the autumn, the difficulties of recruiting becoming apparent, made it plain that the line of the Barren River might have to be given up, and General Johnston endeavored to provide a second line of defense on the Cumberland — with how little effect has already been seen. On this second line, if forced to retreat, he purposed to make his stand as long as possible. But when he compared the unequal preparations for aggression and resistance, and perceived that no warning could stir the Southern people to a just sense of their danger, he beheld calamity coming as the clouds gather for the burst of t
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ve a line of retreat to the latter place or to Grenada, Mississippi, and, if necessary, to Jackson, Mississippi. At Columbus, Kentucky, will be left only a sufficient garrison for the defense of the works there, assisted by Hollins's gunboats, for the purpose of making a desperate defense of the river at that point. A sufficient number of transports will be kept near that place for the removal of the garrison therefrom, when no longer tenable in the opinion of the commanding officer. Island No.10 and Fort Pillow will likewise be defended to the last extremity, aided also by Hollins's gunboats, which will then retire to the vicinity of Memphis, where another bold stand will be made. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, General C. S. A. (Signed) W. J. Hardee, Major-General. A true copy: S. W. Ferguson, Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. This plan of campaign embraced the defense of the line of the Cumberland, if possible; or, if not, then a retreat to Stevenson. Beauregard was to fall back
Russellville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Bowling Green, for there is, I am informed, but one place in the South where a driving-wheel can be made, and not one where a whole locomotive can be constructed. General Johnston did all that was possible when he placed Floyd's command at Russellville, within striking distance of both Bowling Green and Donelson, which were alike threatened. Floyd was at Donelson in time, and could have been at Henry with any reasonable warning. If there were not enough men at Donelson, it was not from defven to the last moment. In a few weeks the enemy's plans were developed just as he had foretold, and that moment came. General John C. Brown informs the writer that he was sent by General Buckner, between the 1st and 4th of February, from Russellville to Bowling Green, in order to have a full conversation with General Johnston touching the reorganization of the troops and some other matters. During this confidential interview, which was frank and extended, General Johnston explained to him
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
e well-ordered retreat from Bowling Green to Nashville. Suppose that these forces could have been e surrender of Donelson. He meant to defend Nashville at Donelson, if he could, and, if not, then fall back to Stevenson by the railroad from Nashville, and thence by the Charleston & Memphis Railton, who had established his headquarters at Edgefield on the northern bank of the Cumberland, saw ht on the 13th, and made his headquarters at Edgefield, opposite Nashville. Colonel Woolley, in th a man was lost, and the little army reached Nashville only in time to hear of the disaster of thein's headquarters were in Edgefield, opposite Nashville. About midnight a dispatch was received frooyd and Pillow having left on steamboats for Nashville I The general was lying on a little camp-bed of General Floyd while he was commanding at Nashville, and I was remarkably impressed by him. . . e rode over to the general's headquarters in Edgefield to advise with him as to the best course und[35 more...]
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
eat to the latter place or to Grenada, Mississippi, and, if necessary, to Jackson, Mississippi. At Columbus, Kentucky, will be left only a sufficient garrison for the defense of the works there, assisted by Hollins's gunboats, for the purpose of making a desperate defense of the river at that point. A sufficient number of transports will be kept near that place for the removal of the garrison therefrom, when no longer tenable in the opinion of the commanding officer. Island No.10 and Fort Pillow will likewise be defended to the last extremity, aided also by Hollins's gunboats, which will then retire to the vicinity of Memphis, where another bold stand will be made. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, General C. S. A. (Signed) W. J. Hardee, Major-General. A true copy: S. W. Ferguson, Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. This plan of campaign embraced the defense of the line of the Cumberland, if possible; or, if not, then a retreat to Stevenson. Beauregard was to fall back southward with
America (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
lf to search for them. Of transportation, without which an army cannot subsist, he had none. Eight hundred wagons were needed. He had no workshops, yet lie got the wagons. Hospitals and a medical department were necessary, for the sick were never less than twenty-five per cent. The great object was to secure Bowling Green against attack, until it could be fortified and succor obtained. This was most skillfully done. The place, in front, soon became, in strength, the second fortress in America, and impregnable everywhere had infantry been sent to protect its wings. While the work was progressing, and while every effort was being made to get more troops, Johnston, by skillful maneuvers, threw his men near the river which divided the two armies, and made the forces of the North believe that he was trying to decoy them across, and then attack them, with a river in their rear; when, in fact, the last thing he wished was a battle, when the odds were four or five to one. His strateg
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
n he compared the unequal preparations for aggression and resistance, and perceived that no warning could stir the Southern people to a just sense of their danger, he beheld calamity coming as the clouds gather for the burst of the hurricane, and, with almost prophetic vision, saw his army forced back to the Cumberland, and beyond to the southern frontier of Tennessee. Colonel Frank Schaller, of the Twenty-second Mississippi, an educated soldier, who published during the war, at Columbia, South Carolina, an edition of Marmont's Spirit of military institutions, with valuable annotations pertinent to the times, illustrates Chapter III. of Part IV. of that work, which describes the picture of a general who answers to all the requirements of the command, by a review of the life and character of General Johnston. Colonel Schaller has for several years been Professor of Modern Languages at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. He begins his brief but appreciative memoir a
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