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William Joseph Hardee (search for this): chapter 33
nce held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. plan of campaign. military prophecy. Colonnce held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. Bowling Green, Kentucky, February 7, 1862. rters (Covington House), by Generals Johnston, Hardee, and myself (Colonel Mackall being present par presented in definite shape to Beauregard and Hardee, had been long maturing in General Johnston's the communication of the force here under General Hardee from the south bank of the Cumberland. Tos consequences of such an event, I ordered General Hardee yesterday to make, as promptly as it couldhe general orders for the march, he instructed Hardee to Let it be known that the object is to secursequently burned. At half-past 3 o'clock, General Hardee retired from the town with the last of hiswas the response from the mob. Generals Floyd, Hardee, and myself, had to make speeches to them befoartment, the corps under the command of Major-General Hardee completed the evacuation of Bowling Gre[2 more...]
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 33
e of success? Buell had an army 75,000 strong. Grant could not be assailed in his fortifications on the north side of the Ohio; and, even if his intrenched position at Paducah had been attacked, he had his fleets and 25,000 men, with Buell and Halleck to draw upon for any required reinforcements up to 100,000 men within three or four days call. Nevertheless, it has been urged that these armies should have been concentrated. To concentrate them for any merely defensive purpose strikes th scale of miles, but by the time required to convey troops over the intervals between commands. Facilities of transportation more than distances, therefore, decide what these interior lines are. An unlimited power of water-communication enabled Halleck and Buell to cooperate fully, and practically to place what force they pleased where they pleased. Such was the concentration that actually took place. Forts Donelson and Henry were nearly twice as far from Bowling Green by land as from the Fe
William Preston Johnston (search for this): chapter 33
ard and Hardee, had been long maturing in General Johnston's mind. To defend the line of the Cumbere united voice of the Kentucky refugees. General Johnston found it hard to steel himself against thfive to one. His strategy succeeded. General Johnston held on to Bowling Green till the last moe army were cheered by the accounts which General Johnston, with thoughtful care, forwarded by meansver might aid the commanders at Donelson, General Johnston neglected nothing to secure the retreat oof his troops, in perfect order. When General Johnston learned, February 15th, that a battle wasar. In the midst of these unhappy scenes General Johnston remained calm, distributing his troops inabout the camps where the troops lay; and General Johnston ordered the establishment of a strong mile disaster almost or quite as soon as did General Johnston. Very early in the morning he rode over s, do not fight a battle in the city. General Johnston also telegraphed Colonel D. P. Buckner, a[23 more...]
George B. Crittenden (search for this): chapter 33
with a river in their rear; when, in fact, the last thing he wished was a battle, when the odds were four or five to one. His strategy succeeded. General Johnston held on to Bowling Green till the last moment. But his right flank, under, Crittenden, was broken. Fort Henry was lost. Donelson was about to be attacked, with a doubtful prospect of successful resistance. It was evident that the time for the evacuation of Bowling Green had come. On the 8th of February General Johnston wrotee army reached Nashville only in time to hear of the disaster of their comrades in arms. While mindful of whatever might aid the commanders at Donelson, General Johnston neglected nothing to secure the retreat of his own column. He brought Crittenden's command back within ten miles of Nashville, and thence to Murfreesboro. Besides the general orders for the march, he instructed Hardee to Let it be known that the object is to secure the crossing of the Cumberland, and no apprehension of the
W. W. Mackall (search for this): chapter 33
to that fact. Memorandum of conference held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. Bowling Green, Kentucky, February 7, 1862. At a meeting held to-day at my quarters (Covington House), by Generals Johnston, Hardee, and myself (Colonel Mackall being present part of the time), it was determined that Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, having fallen yesterday into the hands of the enemy, and Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River, not being tenable, preparations should at once be maeneral Beauregard's earnest solicitation, he had gone through Jackson, Tennessee, to confer with him. In putting Floyd in command at Nashville, General Johnston used the following language, as appears by a memorandum taken at the time by Colonel Mackall: I give you command of the city; you will remove the stores. My only restriction is, do not fight a battle in the city. General Johnston also telegraphed Colonel D. P. Buckner, at Clarksville, February 16th: Do not destroy th
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 33
ajor-General. A true copy: S. W. Ferguson, Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. This plan of campaign embraced the defense of the line of the Cumberland, if possible; or, if not, then a retreat to Stevenson. Beauregard was to fall back southward with Polk's army, leaving a small garrison at Columbus. The immediate evacuation of Bowling Green was now inevitable. His correspondence has already made manifest that General Johnston regarded his stay at Bowling Green as a mere question of time, unlessuring in General Johnston's mind. To defend the line of the Cumberland was his first intention; should that fail, to fall back to Stevenson by the railroad from Nashville, and thence by the Charleston & Memphis Railroad to effect a junction with Polk's command at Corinth. All this was clearly foreshadowed in his conversations with Brown, Munford, Bowen, and Schaller. The preparations for retreat were begun. But these could not be carried out, and the soil of Kentucky abandoned to the ene
only a sufficient force in that town to protect the manufactories and other property, in the saving of which the Confederate Government is interested. From Nashville, should any further retrograde movement become necessary, it will be made to Stevenson, and thence according to circumstances. It was also determined that the possession of the Tennessee River by the enemy, resulting from the fall of Fort Henry, separates the army at Bowling Green from the one at Columbus, Kentucky, which musrd fully prove that the plan of campaign, presented in definite shape to Beauregard and Hardee, had been long maturing in General Johnston's mind. To defend the line of the Cumberland was his first intention; should that fail, to fall back to Stevenson by the railroad from Nashville, and thence by the Charleston & Memphis Railroad to effect a junction with Polk's command at Corinth. All this was clearly foreshadowed in his conversations with Brown, Munford, Bowen, and Schaller. The prepa
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 33
duty or unable to undertake a march. On February 11th, everything being in readiness, the troops began their retreat, Hindman's brigade covering the rear. Breckinridge's command passed through Bowling Green on the 12th, and bivouacked on the night of the 13th two miles north of Franklin. It was on that Thursday night that t and five miles beyond. The Kentuckians retreated sullenly. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, pp. 16-81. General George B. Hodge, then Breckinridge's assistant adjutant-general, in an interesting account of that brigade, mentions that- The spirits of the army were cheered by the accounts which Generale order for retreat was given, and the first intimation the enemy had of the intended evacuation, so far as has been ascertained, was when Generals Hindman and Breckinridge, who were in advance toward his camp, were seen suddenly to retreat toward Bowling Green. The enemy pursued, and succeeded in shelling the town, while Hindman
Jeremy F. Gilmer (search for this): chapter 33
kly too that I believed the effect upon his own reputation would be serious; that the public believed he had 80,000 troops then with him; that they had unbounded confidence in his success; reminded him that when he had ordered his chief-engineer, Gilmer, to fortify Nashville, the popular sense of security was such that Gilmer was laughed at for suggesting the necessity for fortifications, was called in derision Johnston's dirt-digger, and had to abandon the attempt in despair. Now, sir, said I,Gilmer was laughed at for suggesting the necessity for fortifications, was called in derision Johnston's dirt-digger, and had to abandon the attempt in despair. Now, sir, said I, your retreat will startle these people like a thunderbolt; the loss of positions and of States, so unlooked for, will, with as mercurial a people as ours, produce a clamor the like of which you, perhaps, have never heard, and I sincerely trust it may not strike from your grasp the sceptre of your future usefulness. He remained silent and thoughtful for several minutes, and then used words which are indelible in my memory. This, said he, is a step I have pondered well, and such a step as no ma
John C. Brown (search for this): chapter 33
Hardee. plan of campaign. military prophecy. Colonel Schaller's account. resolve to retreat. Munford's account. John C. Brown. preparations for retreat. protests of the Kentuckians. Colonel Woolley's account of General Johnston's work at Bo last moment. In a few weeks the enemy's plans were developed just as he had foretold, and that moment came. General John C. Brown informs the writer that he was sent by General Buckner, between the 1st and 4th of February, from Russellville to which he afterward carried out, before General Beauregard's arrival. The memorandum quoted and the statements of General Brown and Colonels Schaller and Munford fully prove that the plan of campaign, presented in definite shape to Beauregard anailroad to effect a junction with Polk's command at Corinth. All this was clearly foreshadowed in his conversations with Brown, Munford, Bowen, and Schaller. The preparations for retreat were begun. But these could not be carried out, and the
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