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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 33
the retreat from Bowling Green. General Johnston's strategy discussed. Mr. Swinton's extrven is a better answer to the censures of General Johnston's conduct than the most elaborate argumenf the Confederates. No time was given to General Johnston, either through the sluggishness of the eIn this condition, outnumbered on both lines, Johnston does not appear to have comprehended that a dcing, for Grant and Foote had not yet moved. Johnston fell in with this plan, and Beauregard proceeh. On the 7th he held a conference with Generals Johnston and Hardee, the minutes of which are hert. Memorandum of conference held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. Bowling Green, espondence has already made manifest that General Johnston regarded his stay at Bowling Green as a mand which Buell was too wary to make. General Johnston's line of retreat was safe, so long as hi 1862, when at the headquarters of General Albert Sidney Johnston, in the town of Bowling Green, Ken[22 more...]
Isham G. Harris (search for this): chapter 33
Woolley's account of General Johnston's work at Bowling Green. evacuation of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munford's account. panic and mob. Floyd. retreat. Forrest. Governor Harris. letter to the Secretary of War. Forts Henry and Donelson had fallen, and the great water highways were opened to Nashville and to North Alabama. This gave access to the rear of the Confederate armies, and turned the positions both at B deputation of citizens, headed by the mayor, went out to negotiate, and the formal surrender of the city to Buell took place on Tuesday, the 25th. Nashville passed under the yoke that was never to be lifted. It is only just to say that Governor Harris gave General Johnston all the assistance in his power, and that the measures he took were, under the circumstances, bold and judicious. The following is Colonel Munford's account of his share in the transaction, based on his own personal kn
October, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 33
ork, which describes the picture of a general who answers to all the requirements of the command, by a review of the life and character of General Johnston. Colonel Schaller has for several years been Professor of Modern Languages at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. He begins his brief but appreciative memoir as follows : Two foreign officers in the service of the Confederate States were ordered to report for duty to General Albert Sidney Johnston in the month of October, 1861. When leaving his headquarters at Bowling Green, in the State of Kentucky, having then seen and spoken with him for the first time, they simultaneously exclaimed, when outside of the inclosure of the unpretending quarters: He is the very beau-ideal of a general. To one of these officers, who now feebly attempts to pay this humble tribute to the memory of the departed hero, this, his first impulsive exclamation, has become the basis of the greatest veneration of which he is capable.
January 26th (search for this): chapter 33
d. Johnston fell in with this plan, and Beauregard proceeded to Columbus to put it in train of execution. Scarcely, however, had he started for Columbus when the thunder of the Union guns on the Tennessee apprised him that it was too late, and, by the time he reached the Mississippi, Fort Henry had fallen. Without undertaking at all to solve how Mr. Swinton has fallen into such errors, a few facts will demonstrate an entirely different state of case. General Beauregard was ordered, January 26th, by letter from Richmond, to report to General Johnston, and to take command at Columbus. He did not leave Manassas for several days, and probably arrived at Bowling Green about February 5th or 6th. On the 7th he held a conference with Generals Johnston and Hardee, the minutes of which are here given. It will be observed that, on February 4th and 5th, General Johnston was moving troops to Clarksville to support Tilghman, and on the 6th ordered Floyd's entire command thither. Genera
March, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 33
overnor Johnson, in the very spirit of Leonidas, whom he emulated. Sometimes it is harder to do right than to hold a Thermopylae. General Johnston was inexorable. It is sufficient here to say that this gallant and excellent man lived long enough to assure General Johnston of his approval of the strategy he then condemned. Colonel Robert W. Woolley (now of Louisville, Kentucky), who had enjoyed exceptional advantages of observation, in a communication to the New Orleans Picayune, in March, 1862, in describing General Johnston's work at Bowling Green, says: An army must be obtained, or else he must evacuate the citadel that guards Nashville. A small army was obtained; but where, or how, it will puzzle the historian of this war to relate. By extraordinary exertions he secured a regiment here and another there; but few with any drill, and only five of them for three months with uniforms. The army had to be built up; and the general had not only to organize the troops, but
January, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 33
ke demonstrations by water. Long before Fort Henry fell, in view of the disappointments to which General Johnston had been subjected, he was fully aware that his line, unless it was strongly reinforced, could not be held; and in the month of January, 1862, when one day looking with Colonel Bowen upon a map, showing the course of the Tennessee River, these memorable and propletic words fell from his lips when pointing out a spot marked Shiloh Church: Here the great battle of the Southwest will formation in regard to it, and received the following statement: Richmond, Virginia, May 22, 1863. Colonel: I give to you, according to your request, with great pleasure the following statement of facts, which occurred during the month of January, 1862, when at the headquarters of General Albert Sidney Johnston, in the town of Bowling Green, Kentucky, and in the presence of then Colonel (now General) John S. Bowen, commanding the forts and the town of Bowling Green, of which former my regim
February 15th (search for this): chapter 33
ces of artillery on the town, and especially on the railroad-depot, which was subsequently burned. At half-past 3 o'clock, General Hardee retired from the town with the last of his troops, in perfect order. When General Johnston learned, February 15th, that a battle was raging at Donelson, he assumed that Buell might attack his rear, and placed Bowen's brigade, which had the head of column, in line of battle on each side of the road, the other brigades forming on it as they came up. Ordersossible it was to obtain labor in order to provide defenses for the city. Even when General Johnston's army was found retiring upon Nashville, the good news from Donelson kept the public mind in a state of unnatural elation. Even as late as February 15th he found that the measures he had taken to obstruct by a raft the Cumberland River, which was falling, were thwarted by the dead weight of popular opposition, directed by the river-men, who as a class resisted it. Reverse seemed impossible.
February 16th (search for this): chapter 33
pital, though in that time, at General Beauregard's earnest solicitation, he had gone through Jackson, Tennessee, to confer with him. In putting Floyd in command at Nashville, General Johnston used the following language, as appears by a memorandum taken at the time by Colonel Mackall: I give you command of the city; you will remove the stores. My only restriction is, do not fight a battle in the city. General Johnston also telegraphed Colonel D. P. Buckner, at Clarksville, February 16th: Do not destroy the army stores, if their destruction will endanger the city. If you can burn the army stores without destroying the city, do it. Thus, in the hour of his own deepest distress, he was vigilant and solicitous for the welfare of citizens and non-combatants. The following extract is from General Johnston's letter to the Secretary of War: headquarters, Western Department, Nashville, February 18, 1862. sir: In conformity with the intention announced to the d
February 14th (search for this): chapter 33
wn column. He brought Crittenden's command back within ten miles of Nashville, and thence to Murfreesboro. Besides the general orders for the march, he instructed Hardee to Let it be known that the object is to secure the crossing of the Cumberland, and no apprehension of the enemy in the rear. You will thus preserve their morale. This order must be communicated to the rear of the column, and cavalry must be left in rear to assist the sick and bring up stragglers. At noon, on the 14th of February, the Federal vanguard appeared opposite Bowling Green, and opened fire from several pieces of artillery on the town, and especially on the railroad-depot, which was subsequently burned. At half-past 3 o'clock, General Hardee retired from the town with the last of his troops, in perfect order. When General Johnston learned, February 15th, that a battle was raging at Donelson, he assumed that Buell might attack his rear, and placed Bowen's brigade, which had the head of column, in li
February 11th (search for this): chapter 33
ather was wet and cold, and very trying to men unused to the hardships of a winter campaign. Only 500 were in hospital at Bowling Green; but, before the army reached Nashville, 5,400, out of the 14,000, fell under the care of the medical authorities. Medical Director D. W. Yandell, in making this report at Nashville, February 18, 1862, says this large number is to be accounted for by the immense number of convalescents and men merely unfit for duty or unable to undertake a march. On February 11th, everything being in readiness, the troops began their retreat, Hindman's brigade covering the rear. Breckinridge's command passed through Bowling Green on the 12th, and bivouacked on the night of the 13th two miles north of Franklin. It was on that Thursday night that the weather became so intensely cold, as was related in the siege of Fort Donelson. The next day's march brought them to Camp Trousdale, where they occupied the huts; but with little profit, as some atmospheric conditi
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