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Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
omrades in arms. While mindful of whatever might aid the commanders at Donelson, General Johnston neglected nothing to secure the retreat of his own column. He brought Crittenden's command back within ten miles of Nashville, and thence to Murfreesboro. Besides the general orders for the march, he instructed Hardee to Let it be known that the object is to secure the crossing of the Cumberland, and no apprehension of the enemy in the rear. You will thus preserve their morale. This order musor-General Hardee completed the evacuation of Bowling Green on the 14th inst., and the rear-guard passed the Cumberland at this point yesterday morning in good order. I have ordered the army to encamp to-night midway between this place and Murfreesboro. My purpose is, to place the force in such a position that the enemy cannot concentrate his superior strength against the command, and to enable me to assemble as rapidly as possible such other troops in addition as it may be in my power to c
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
on of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munford's account. panic and mob. Fvernor Harris. letter to the Secretary of War. Forts Henry and Donelson had fallen, and the great water highways were opened to Nashville pleased. Such was the concentration that actually took place. Forts Donelson and Henry were nearly twice as far from Bowling Green by land aRiver, having fallen yesterday into the hands of the enemy, and Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River, not being tenable, preparations shoulright flank, under, Crittenden, was broken. Fort Henry was lost. Donelson was about to be attacked, with a doubtful prospect of successful reather became so intensely cold, as was related in the siege of Fort Donelson. The next day's march brought them to Camp Trousdale, where theneral Johnston sums up the fate of Donelson: At 2 A. M. to-day Fort Donelson surrendered. We lost all. Colonel Munford, who was General
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
owever, had he started for Columbus when the thunder of the Union guns on the Tennessee apprised him that it was too late, and, by the time he reached the Mississippi, Fort Henry had fallen. Without undertaking at all to solve how Mr. Swinton has fallen into such errors, a few facts will demonstrate an entirely different state of case. General Beauregard was ordered, January 26th, by letter from Richmond, to report to General Johnston, and to take command at Columbus. He did not leave Manassas for several days, and probably arrived at Bowling Green about February 5th or 6th. On the 7th he held a conference with Generals Johnston and Hardee, the minutes of which are here given. It will be observed that, on February 4th and 5th, General Johnston was moving troops to Clarksville to support Tilghman, and on the 6th ordered Floyd's entire command thither. General Beauregard remained in Bowling Green until the 12th. His conference with General Johnston did not take place until F
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ude could only result fatally — that his sole ground of hope rested in taking advantage of his interior position to concentrate the gross of his force at a single point, and assume the offensive against one or the other of the two Union armies. Connected with this is a piece of secret history, revealed to me by General Beauregard since the close of the war, which will not be out of place here. Toward the close of the first month of the year 1862, General Beauregard was transferred from Virginia to the West, to take charge, under Sidney Johnston, of the defense of the Mississippi Valley. En route he visited Johnston at his headquarters at Bowling Green, and between the two officers a prolonged conference ensued, touching the best method of action. It was with the liveliest concern that Beauregard, who had understood at Richmond that Johnston's force numbered 60,000 men, learned that in reality it was little over one-half that aggregate. But that officer was always essentially agg
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ion to be furnished you. The Legislature can also adjourn to some other place. You can do no further good here now, and I think you should take the public archives under your especial charge. The Governor said he would do so, went back, wrote a message to the Legislature, took charge of the archives as he had promised, put them in a place of safety, and in forty-eight hours was back at the capital, though in that time, at General Beauregard's earnest solicitation, he had gone through Jackson, Tennessee, to confer with him. In putting Floyd in command at Nashville, General Johnston used the following language, as appears by a memorandum taken at the time by Colonel Mackall: I give you command of the city; you will remove the stores. My only restriction is, do not fight a battle in the city. General Johnston also telegraphed Colonel D. P. Buckner, at Clarksville, February 16th: Do not destroy the army stores, if their destruction will endanger the city. If you can
Humboldt, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
already stated; and the other one, of that part of the State lying between the Tennessee River and the Mississippi. But, as the possession of the former river by the enemy renders the lines of communication of the army at Columbus liable to be cut off at any time from the Tennessee River as a base, by an overpowering force of the enemy, rapidly concentrated from various points on the Ohio, it becomes necessary, to prevent such a calamity, that the main body of that army should fall back to Humboldt, and thence, if necessary, to Grand Junction, so as to protect Memphis from either point, and still have a line of retreat to the latter place or to Grenada, Mississippi, and, if necessary, to Jackson, Mississippi. At Columbus, Kentucky, will be left only a sufficient garrison for the defense of the works there, assisted by Hollins's gunboats, for the purpose of making a desperate defense of the river at that point. A sufficient number of transports will be kept near that place for the
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
, applied to Colonel Schaller for more explicit information in regard to it, and received the following statement: Richmond, Virginia, May 22, 1863. Colonel: I give to you, according to your request, with great pleasure the following statement ofervant, F. Schaller, Colonel Twenty-second Mississipi Infantry, P. A. C. S. To Colonel William Preston Johnston, Richmond, Virginia. The writer is indebted to Colonel Munford's address, so frequently quoted, for the following important incidenkians and Tennesseeans, and as the rendezvous for volunteers for the front, it had come to be looked upon in the West as Richmond was an the East. Its original population of some 30,000 had probably been doubled, and, from a rather provincial and Un the rivers. I entertain the hope that this disposition will enable me to hold the enemy in check; and, when my forces are sufficiently increased, to drive him back .... Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of War, Richmond, Virginia. A. S. Johnston.
Richmond, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Valley. En route he visited Johnston at his headquarters at Bowling Green, and between the two officers a prolonged conference ensued, touching the best method of action. It was with the liveliest concern that Beauregard, who had understood at Richmond that Johnston's force numbered 60,000 men, learned that in reality it was little over one-half that aggregate. But that officer was always essentially aggressive in his military inspiration, and he now proposed that the works at Columbus shouldsissippi, Fort Henry had fallen. Without undertaking at all to solve how Mr. Swinton has fallen into such errors, a few facts will demonstrate an entirely different state of case. General Beauregard was ordered, January 26th, by letter from Richmond, to report to General Johnston, and to take command at Columbus. He did not leave Manassas for several days, and probably arrived at Bowling Green about February 5th or 6th. On the 7th he held a conference with Generals Johnston and Hardee, th
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 33
with valuable annotations pertinent to the times, illustrates Chapter III. of Part IV. of that work, which describes the picture of a general who answers to all the requirements of the command, by a review of the life and character of General Johnston. Colonel Schaller has for several years been Professor of Modern Languages at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. He begins his brief but appreciative memoir as follows : Two foreign officers in the service of the Confederate States were ordered to report for duty to General Albert Sidney Johnston in the month of October, 1861. When leaving his headquarters at Bowling Green, in the State of Kentucky, having then seen and spoken with him for the first time, they simultaneously exclaimed, when outside of the inclosure of the unpretending quarters: He is the very beau-ideal of a general. To one of these officers, who now feebly attempts to pay this humble tribute to the memory of the departed hero, this, his first
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
work at Bowling Green. evacuation of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munf held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. Bowling Green, Kentucky, February 7, 1862. At a meeting held to-day at my quarters (Cov1861. When leaving his headquarters at Bowling Green, in the State of Kentucky, having then seen and spoken with him for the first time, ths of General Albert Sidney Johnston, in the town of Bowling Green, Kentucky, and in the presence of then Colonel (now General) John S. Bowen, to both the South and yourself. I then sketched the connection of Kentucky with the Confederacy; that its Governor and Council were then unde Senators to our Congress; that they must flee with him, and leave Kentucky with no organized representation of the Southern cause on its soilt were begun. But these could not be carried out, and the soil of Kentucky abandoned to the enemy, without exciting the liveliest emotions of
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