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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Hamburg Landing (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
mand, and the thorough knowledge of the strength of his line of defense, as well as of the topography of the country which he occupied, he was eminently conscious that, without a speedy accession of strength his line would become untenable, and that a new contracted line could only be obtained south of Tennessee River. When and by whom this would be executed was, of course, beyond the bounds of human calculation; but Corinth afterward did become the strategic point of the campaign, and Hamburg Landing was the most convenient port whereby to reach it, and from whence it could be threatened. ... With sentiments of the highest esteem I am, colonel, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, F. Schaller, Colonel Twenty-second Mississipi Infantry, P. A. C. S. To Colonel William Preston Johnston, Richmond, Virginia. The writer is indebted to Colonel Munford's address, so frequently quoted, for the following important incident: Not very long before the evacuation of Bowling
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Harris. letter to the Secretary of War. Forts Henry and Donelson had fallen, and the great wateGreen and Columbus would have been uncovered. Henry had no value, except as the gateway of the Ten that actually took place. Forts Donelson and Henry were nearly twice as far from Bowling Green bysaster. Grant moved February 2d; in four days Henry was in his hands. Ten days only intervened beand, by the time he reached the Mississippi, Fort Henry had fallen. Without undertaking at all tuary 7th, when they both knew of the fall of Fort Henry, and made their plans with reference to thatnt part of the time), it was determined that Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, having fallen yestever by the enemy, resulting from the fall of Fort Henry, separates the army at Bowling Green from tho make demonstrations by water. Long before Fort Henry fell, in view of the disappointments to whiccretary of War, informing him of the loss of Fort Henry, and the condition of things at Donelson. H[1 more...]
Franklin (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
authorities. Medical Director D. W. Yandell, in making this report at Nashville, February 18, 1862, says this large number is to be accounted for by the immense number of convalescents and men merely unfit for duty or unable to undertake a march. On February 11th, everything being in readiness, the troops began their retreat, Hindman's brigade covering the rear. Breckinridge's command passed through Bowling Green on the 12th, and bivouacked on the night of the 13th two miles north of Franklin. It was on that Thursday night that the weather became so intensely cold, as was related in the siege of Fort Donelson. The next day's march brought them to Camp Trousdale, where they occupied the huts; but with little profit, as some atmospheric condition made the smoke in them intolerable. After a bad night from smoke and the bitter cold, they marched twenty-seven miles next day, and on the day after, the 16th, through Nashville, and five miles beyond. The Kentuckians retreated sullen
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ad no value, except as the gateway of the Tennessee River; nor Donelson, save as an outpost of Nashit was determined that Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, having fallen yesterday into the hands olso determined that the possession of the Tennessee River by the enemy, resulting from the fall of that part of the State lying between the Tennessee River and the Mississippi. But, as the possessliable to be cut off at any time from the Tennessee River as a base, by an overpowering force of thwen upon a map, showing the course of the Tennessee River, these memorable and propletic words fell. S. Johnston to survey the course of the Tennessee River as far as Florence, Alabama, where its nacted line could only be obtained south of Tennessee River. When and by whom this would be executedary to take his new position south of the Tennessee River; that the Governor and Legislature would his usual animated style. He says: The Tennessee troops were naturally most influenced by t
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
urned the positions both at Bowling Green and Columbus. Of course, such misfortunes could not happeny one time on the line from Bowling Green to Columbus, and in reserve, was never more than 43,000 mld a defense of this line have been made? At Columbus? Then must the defense of Middle Tennessee hg Green. But, last of all, if the barrier at Columbus had been abandoned to maintain Bowling Green,ration, and he now proposed that the works at Columbus should be so reduced that their defense mightution. Scarcely, however, had he started for Columbus when the thunder of the Union guns on the Tent to General Johnston, and to take command at Columbus. He did not leave Manassas for several days,he army at Bowling Green from the one at Columbus, Kentucky, which must henceforth act independentlycessary, to Jackson, Mississippi. At Columbus, Kentucky, will be left only a sufficient garrisonith Polk's army, leaving a small garrison at Columbus. The immediate evacuation of Bowling Green w[3 more...]
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
n were given up, the rear of the armies at Bowling Green and Columbus would have been uncovered. Hon and Henry were nearly twice as far from Bowling Green by land as from the Federal strongholds byGenerals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. Bowling Green, Kentucky, February 7, 1862. At a meetiral Albert Sidney Johnston, in the town of Bowling Green, Kentucky, and in the presence of then Colowen, commanding the forts and the town of Bowling Green, of which former my regiment garrisoned Fo Not very long before the evacuation of Bowling Green, the general and myself being alone, lie las closed by his assuring me he would hold Bowling Green as long as it was safe to do so-even to thjunction of the Gallatin and Nashville and Bowling Green and Nashville [turnpike] roads, about ten camp, were seen suddenly to retreat toward Bowling Green. The enemy pursued, and succeeded in shelry, the Federal vanguard appeared opposite Bowling Green, and opened fire from several pieces of ar[27 more...]
Grenada (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
he enemy renders the lines of communication of the army at Columbus liable to be cut off at any time from the Tennessee River as a base, by an overpowering force of the enemy, rapidly concentrated from various points on the Ohio, it becomes necessary, to prevent such a calamity, that the main body of that army should fall back to Humboldt, and thence, if necessary, to Grand Junction, so as to protect Memphis from either point, and still have a line of retreat to the latter place or to Grenada, Mississippi, and, if necessary, to Jackson, Mississippi. At Columbus, Kentucky, will be left only a sufficient garrison for the defense of the works there, assisted by Hollins's gunboats, for the purpose of making a desperate defense of the river at that point. A sufficient number of transports will be kept near that place for the removal of the garrison therefrom, when no longer tenable in the opinion of the commanding officer. Island No.10 and Fort Pillow will likewise be defended to the l
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
fense of this line have been made? At Columbus? Then must the defense of Middle Tennessee have been abandoned without an effort to save it. At Henry and Donelson? n be brought together; the first one having for object the defense of the State of Tennessee along its line of operation as already stated; and the other one, of thatis army forced back to the Cumberland, and beyond to the southern frontier of Tennessee. Colonel Frank Schaller, of the Twenty-second Mississippi, an educated so of the war in the Western Department. The Senators and Representatives from Tennessee, with the exception of Judge Swann, waited upon the President, saying, We comree of importance. It was the capital of the rich, populous, and martial State of Tennessee. As the base of Bowling Green, as a depot of supplies for the armies of ot be carried off nor distributed to the citizens, burned; and the capital of Tennessee (although we did not know it then) was abandoned finally to the enemy. Morga
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Chapter 29: the retreat from Bowling Green. General Johnston's strategy discussed. Mr. Swinton's extraordinary statement. memorandum of conference held f the Kentuckians. Colonel Woolley's account of General Johnston's work at Bowling Green. evacuation of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. precautions.Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munford's account. panic and mob. Floyd. retreat. Forrest. Governor Harris. letter to the Secretary of War. Forts Heess to the rear of the Confederate armies, and turned the positions both at Bowling Green and Columbus. Of course, such misfortunes could not happen in his departmeital of the rich, populous, and martial State of Tennessee. As the base of Bowling Green, as a depot of supplies for the armies of the East as well as of the West, corps under the command of Major-General Hardee completed the evacuation of Bowling Green on the 14th inst., and the rear-guard passed the Cumberland at this point y
Henry (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
y defensive purpose strikes the writer as mere fatuity. But this aside, at what one point could a defense of this line have been made? At Columbus? Then must the defense of Middle Tennessee have been abandoned without an effort to save it. At Henry and Donelson? The same result would have ensued, for there was nothing to prevent Buell's advance, except the interposition of the force at Bowling Green. But, last of all, if the barrier at Columbus had been abandoned to maintain Bowling Greenucted. General Johnston did all that was possible when he placed Floyd's command at Russellville, within striking distance of both Bowling Green and Donelson, which were alike threatened. Floyd was at Donelson in time, and could have been at Henry with any reasonable warning. If there were not enough men at Donelson, it was not from defect of judgment, but from want of adequate means. The elements, too, fought for the Federals. An unprecedented flood favored their attacks by water, whil
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