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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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oint, and still have a line of retreat to the latter place or to Grenada, Mississippi, and, if necessary, to Jackson, Mississippi. At Columbus, Kentucky, will be left only a sufficient garrison for the defense of the works there, assisted by Hollins's gunboats, for the purpose of making a desperate defense of the river at that point. A sufficient number of transports will be kept near that place for the removal of the garrison therefrom, when no longer tenable in the opinion of the commanding officer. Island No.10 and Fort Pillow will likewise be defended to the last extremity, aided also by Hollins's gunboats, which will then retire to the vicinity of Memphis, where another bold stand will be made. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, General C. S. A. (Signed) W. J. Hardee, Major-General. A true copy: S. W. Ferguson, Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. This plan of campaign embraced the defense of the line of the Cumberland, if possible; or, if not, then a retreat to Stevenson. Beaureg
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 33
dum of conference held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. plan of campaign. military prose of the first month of the year 1862, General Beauregard was transferred from Virginia to the Wesmoved. Johnston fell in with this plan, and Beauregard proceeded to Columbus to put it in train of te an entirely different state of case. General Beauregard was ordered, January 26th, by letter froordered Floyd's entire command thither. General Beauregard remained in Bowling Green until the 12thdum of conference held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. Bowling Green, Kentucky, Februae; or, if not, then a retreat to Stevenson. Beauregard was to fall back southward with Polk's army,n which he afterward carried out, before General Beauregard's arrival. The memorandum quoted and of campaign, presented in definite shape to Beauregard and Hardee, had been long maturing in Genera at the capital, though in that time, at General Beauregard's earnest solicitation, he had gone thro[4 more...]
Robert W. Woolley (search for this): chapter 33
. resolve to retreat. Munford's account. John C. Brown. preparations for retreat. protests of the Kentuckians. Colonel Woolley's account of General Johnston's work at Bowling Green. evacuation of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. nelson and Henry were nearly twice as far from Bowling Green by land as from the Federal strongholds by water. Colonel Robert W. Woolley, in a letter written at the time, says: The railroad was almost bare of transportation. The locomotives cellent man lived long enough to assure General Johnston of his approval of the strategy he then condemned. Colonel Robert W. Woolley (now of Louisville, Kentucky), who had enjoyed exceptional advantages of observation, in a communication to theohnston left Bowling Green before daylight on the 13th, and made his headquarters at Edgefield, opposite Nashville. Colonel Woolley, in the article before mentioned, says: The evacuation was accomplished, protected by a force so small as to m
Edward W. Munford (search for this): chapter 33
ophecy. Colonel Schaller's account. resolve to retreat. Munford's account. John C. Brown. preparations for retreat. progade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munford's account. panic and mob. Floyd. retreat. Forrest. Goe. The chief were inadequate forces and armament. In Colonel Munford's pointed language, he had no army. General Johnstoton, Richmond, Virginia. The writer is indebted to Colonel Munford's address, so frequently quoted, for the following imp the statements of General Brown and Colonels Schaller and Munford fully prove that the plan of campaign, presented in defini was clearly foreshadowed in his conversations with Brown, Munford, Bowen, and Schaller. The preparations for retreat wer M. to-day Fort Donelson surrendered. We lost all. Colonel Munford, who was General Johnston's aide-de-camp, in his addree circumstances, bold and judicious. The following is Colonel Munford's account of his share in the transaction, based on hi
A. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 33
map, the general and Colonel Bowen were standing, the former giving evidently an explanation of its military positions. In the course of their conversation, General Johnston directed Colonel Bowen's attention to a position upon this map, which had been marked by the engineers, Shiloh Church, and, concluding his remarks, he laid ed to our memory in the strongest manner when Brigadier-General Bowen and myself were actually engaged in the terrible conflict, which the prophetic words of General Johnston had fully three months previously predicted. Meeting General Bowen upon the battle-field of Shiloh Church, shortly after he (General Bowen) had been woundedese facts simply as they occurred, without any addition whatsoever; but you must permit me here to state my firm conviction that this incident in the life of General Johnston was not a singular chance, as sometimes will happen in the life of man, but gloriously illustrating the strategic genius of the lamented general. With the i
Jeff Thompson (search for this): chapter 33
as on that Thursday night that the weather became so intensely cold, as was related in the siege of Fort Donelson. The next day's march brought them to Camp Trousdale, where they occupied the huts; but with little profit, as some atmospheric condition made the smoke in them intolerable. After a bad night from smoke and the bitter cold, they marched twenty-seven miles next day, and on the day after, the 16th, through Nashville, and five miles beyond. The Kentuckians retreated sullenly. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, pp. 16-81. General George B. Hodge, then Breckinridge's assistant adjutant-general, in an interesting account of that brigade, mentions that- The spirits of the army were cheered by the accounts which General Johnston, with thoughtful care, forwarded by means of couriers daily, of the successful resistance of the army. The entire army bivouacked in line of battle on the night of the 15th, at the junction of the Gallatin and Nashville and B
John S. Bowen (search for this): chapter 33
f January, 1862, when one day looking with Colonel Bowen upon a map, showing the course of the Tennthe presence of then Colonel (now General) John S. Bowen, commanding the forts and the town of Bowlng. In front of this map, the general and Colonel Bowen were standing, the former giving evidentlyir conversation, General Johnston directed Colonel Bowen's attention to a position upon this map, wr memory in the strongest manner when Brigadier-General Bowen and myself were actually engaged in three months previously predicted. Meeting General Bowen upon the battle-field of Shiloh Church, shortly after he (General Bowen) had been wounded, and while my regiment was replenishing its ammunitdge of the fall of our illustrious leader, General Bowen recalled the circumstances above cited, anowed in his conversations with Brown, Munford, Bowen, and Schaller. The preparations for retread that Buell might attack his rear, and placed Bowen's brigade, which had the head of column, in li
George W. Johnson (search for this): chapter 33
easts of the Southern party at Bowling Green. The soldiers, though depressed, received the fact of retreat with that sullen resolution which the military life engenders; but all others seemed filled with despair. The Provisional Governor, George W. Johnson, a warm friend and admirer of General Johnston, but self-confident and enthusiastic, regarded the abandonment of the soil of the Commonwealth as an act of political suicide, and all the civilians shared this opinion. He appealed to Generalrefugees. General Johnston found it hard to steel himself against these eager petitioners, who had given up their homes to follow the fortunes of his army, but he was bound to do what was right and necessary. A letter was written to him by Governor Johnson, in the very spirit of Leonidas, whom he emulated. Sometimes it is harder to do right than to hold a Thermopylae. General Johnston was inexorable. It is sufficient here to say that this gallant and excellent man lived long enough to assur
Wilson Duke (search for this): chapter 33
ry soldiers and the roll of their baggage-wagons were continuous through that dreary day and those which succeeded it. Duke, in his Life of Morgan (page 113), tells what he saw, in his usual animated style. He says: The Tennessee troops wem the north side of the river before the bridges were destroyed on the night of the 19th. Fear was replaced by greed. Duke says, in his graphic way: Excitement and avarice seemed to stimulate the people to preternatural strength. I saw ansion. Forrest came into personal collision with mob-leaders, and his cavalry twice charged the mob with drawn sabres. Duke speaks of Floyd's conduct in terms of the highest commendation. Hie says: Nothing could have been more admirable thville, and I was remarkably impressed by him. . . . He was evidently endowed with no common nerve, will, and judgment. Duke illustrates his conclusions about Floyd by details of his conduct, highly creditable to that general. He continues:
Nathan Bedford Forrest (search for this): chapter 33
ucky brigade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munford's account. panic and mob. Floyd. retreat. Forrest. Governor Harris. letter to the Secretary of War. Forts Henry and Donelson had fallen, and the great water highwaysermitted spoliation, when limits were overstepped, had to be kept within bounds by the sternest measures of repression. Forrest came into personal collision with mob-leaders, and his cavalry twice charged the mob with drawn sabres. Duke speaks left behind when we, in our turn, departed, witnessed the arrival of the Federals, and their occupation of the city. Forrest's cavalry was very useful in the enforcement of order and in facilitating the removal of stores. Their reputation and muliarly fitted him for rising above the tumult of civil commotion. His regiment remained in Nashville until Friday, and Forrest himself, with a small detachment, staid until Sunday, the 23d of February, when the enemy's advance-guard appeared in Ed
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