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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Daniel S. Donelson (search for this): chapter 33
ed without an effort to save it. At Henry and Donelson? The same result would have ensued, for therpt as the gateway of the Tennessee River; nor Donelson, save as an outpost of Nashville. While in striking distance of both Bowling Green and Donelson, which were alike threatened. Floyd was at Dn of the attack on Henry and the surrender of Donelson. He meant to defend Nashville at Donelson, iton told him that if he should lose Henry and Donelson, he should fall back to the line of the Cumbe a time, but the multitudes of fugitives from Donelson who came pouring in soon overtaxed the efforthe 16th, General Johnston sums up the fate of Donelson: At 2 A. M. to-day Fort Donelson surrendered.escribes the announcement of the surrender of Donelson: General Johnston's headquarters were ined by another messenger with dispatches from Donelson. I lighted a candle, and at the general's ren giving coherence to the routed fugitives of Donelson. His duty was, besides, to save from the wre
Chapter 29: the retreat from Bowling Green. General Johnston's strategy discussed. Mr. Swinton's extraordinary statement. memorandum of conference held by Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Hardee. plan of campaign. military prophecy. Colonel Schaller's account. resolve to retreat. Munford's account. John C. Browfend Nashville at Donelson, if he could, and, if not, then to reunite his corps and to fight on a more retired line. A very astonishing statement is made by Mr. Swinton, in his Decisive battles of the War, page 65. He says: In this condition, outnumbered on both lines, Johnston does not appear to have comprehended that a the Tennessee apprised him that it was too late, and, by the time he reached the Mississippi, Fort Henry had fallen. Without undertaking at all to solve how Mr. Swinton has fallen into such errors, a few facts will demonstrate an entirely different state of case. General Beauregard was ordered, January 26th, by letter from Ric
Simon B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 33
t the clamor of to-day is converted into the praises of to-morrow by a simple success. All I require to rectify that is to get in position where I can fight a battle, and I think all will be well. The conversation was closed by his assuring me he would hold Bowling Green as long as it was safe to do so-even to the last moment. In a few weeks the enemy's plans were developed just as he had foretold, and that moment came. General John C. Brown informs the writer that he was sent by General Buckner, between the 1st and 4th of February, from Russellville to Bowling Green, in order to have a full conversation with General Johnston touching the reorganization of the troops and some other matters. During this confidential interview, which was frank and extended, General Johnston explained to him the positions and relative strength of Buell's army and his own, and read to him a good deal of his correspondence elucidating these points. Among other things, General Johnston told him tha
Frank Schaller (search for this): chapter 33
eauregard, and Hardee. plan of campaign. military prophecy. Colonel Schaller's account. resolve to retreat. Munford's account. John C. Bland, and beyond to the southern frontier of Tennessee. Colonel Frank Schaller, of the Twenty-second Mississippi, an educated soldier, who by a review of the life and character of General Johnston. Colonel Schaller has for several years been Professor of Modern Languages at thng General Johnston's employment of his time at Bowling Green, Colonel Schaller adds: The result of all this was unshaken confidence on present writer, struck by this remarkable incident, applied to Colonel Schaller for more explicit information in regard to it, and received thThe memorandum quoted and the statements of General Brown and Colonels Schaller and Munford fully prove that the plan of campaign, presented foreshadowed in his conversations with Brown, Munford, Bowen, and Schaller. The preparations for retreat were begun. But these could not
Andrew H. Foote (search for this): chapter 33
ggregate. But that officer was always essentially aggressive in his military inspiration, and he now proposed that the works at Columbus should be so reduced that their defense might be sustained by two or three thousand men; that the remaining 12,000 should be brought to Bowling Green and joined to the 22,000 there, and that with the united force a vigorous, and, if possible, a crushing blow should be dealt to Buell's army, which was regarded at the time as the most menacing, for Grant and Foote had not yet moved. Johnston fell in with this plan, and Beauregard proceeded to Columbus to put it in train of execution. Scarcely, however, had he started for Columbus when the thunder of the Union guns on the Tennessee apprised him that it was too late, and, by the time he reached the Mississippi, Fort Henry had fallen. Without undertaking at all to solve how Mr. Swinton has fallen into such errors, a few facts will demonstrate an entirely different state of case. General Beauregard
cement of the surrender of Donelson: General Johnston's headquarters were in Edgefield, opposite Nashville. About midnight a dispatch was received from General Pillow, announcing a victory complete and glorious. We were jubilant over the result. All went to bed happy, the general and myself occupying the same room. Just the general's request read to him the astounding official statement that the place would capitulate at daylight, and the army be surrendered by Buckner, Floyd and Pillow having left on steamboats for Nashville I The general was lying on a little camp-bed in one corner; he was silent a moment, and then asked me to read the dispatchelegations of public functionaries and private citizens who were crowding round him for advice under the changed state of affairs. He received Generals Floyd and Pillow with the greatest courtesy, and made the former commandant of the post at Nashville. The excitement and confusion continued, and on Monday night an immense mob b
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 33
r other interference by the enemy — a result manifestly not in the table of probabilities-and led against either Buell or Grant, what would have been the chance of success? Buell had an army 75,000 strong. Grant could not be assailed in his fortifGrant could not be assailed in his fortifications on the north side of the Ohio; and, even if his intrenched position at Paducah had been attacked, he had his fleets and 25,000 men, with Buell and Halleck to draw upon for any required reinforcements up to 100,000 men within three or four don, either through the sluggishness of the enemy, or by the prolonged resistance of his own troops, to repair disaster. Grant moved February 2d; in four days Henry was in his hands. Ten days only intervened between General Johnston's first informd, if possible, a crushing blow should be dealt to Buell's army, which was regarded at the time as the most menacing, for Grant and Foote had not yet moved. Johnston fell in with this plan, and Beauregard proceeded to Columbus to put it in train of
l the civilians shared this opinion. He appealed to General Johnston in the most urgent and moving terms to change his purpose, and he was supported by the protests and appeals of the united voice of the Kentucky refugees. General Johnston found it hard to steel himself against these eager petitioners, who had given up their homes to follow the fortunes of his army, but he was bound to do what was right and necessary. A letter was written to him by Governor Johnson, in the very spirit of Leonidas, whom he emulated. Sometimes it is harder to do right than to hold a Thermopylae. General Johnston was inexorable. It is sufficient here to say that this gallant and excellent man lived long enough to assure General Johnston of his approval of the strategy he then condemned. Colonel Robert W. Woolley (now of Louisville, Kentucky), who had enjoyed exceptional advantages of observation, in a communication to the New Orleans Picayune, in March, 1862, in describing General Johnston's wor
George B. Hodge (search for this): chapter 33
s related in the siege of Fort Donelson. The next day's march brought them to Camp Trousdale, where they occupied the huts; but with little profit, as some atmospheric condition made the smoke in them intolerable. After a bad night from smoke and the bitter cold, they marched twenty-seven miles next day, and on the day after, the 16th, through Nashville, and five miles beyond. The Kentuckians retreated sullenly. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, pp. 16-81. General George B. Hodge, then Breckinridge's assistant adjutant-general, in an interesting account of that brigade, mentions that- The spirits of the army were cheered by the accounts which General Johnston, with thoughtful care, forwarded by means of couriers daily, of the successful resistance of the army. The entire army bivouacked in line of battle on the night of the 15th, at the junction of the Gallatin and Nashville and Bowling Green and Nashville [turnpike] roads, about ten miles from Nashvil
enemy were circulated, and were believed even by officers of high rank. Upon the second day, matters had arrived at such a state, and the excitement and disorder were so extreme, that it became necessary to take other precautions to repress the license that was prevailing, besides the establishment of guards and sentinels about the camps where the troops lay; and General Johnston ordered the establishment of a strong military police in Nashville. The First Missouri Infantry, Under Colonel Rich, a valuable officer, who lost his life at Shiloh. one of the finest and best-disciplined regiments in the service, was detailed for this duty, and Morgan's squadron was sent to assist it. Our duty was to patrol the city and suburbs, and we were constantly engaged at it until the city was evacuated. Floyd had no common task in holding in check an infuriated mob, and in giving coherence to the routed fugitives of Donelson. His duty was, besides, to save from the wreck the most importan
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