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Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
oncerting a combined movement. It was the advance of Buell that now hastened General Johnston's resolution to attack: The First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Divisions, commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals Thomas, McCook, Nelson, Crittenden, and Wood, with a contingent force of cavalry, in all 37,000 effective men, constituted the main army, which, under the personal command of General Buell, was to join General Halleck in the projected movement against the enemy at Corinth, Mississippi. Army of the Cumberland, vol. i., p. 99. Mitchell's corps, moving against Florence, was 18,000 strong. The writer has used every effort to ascertain with entire accuracy the forces engaged in the battle of Shiloh. He lays before the reader all the information he can obtain. The Hon. Mr. McCrary, Secretary of War, kindly put at his disposal all the data in possession of the War Department. These are given in the Appendix to the battle of Shiloh, showing for the first tim
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 35
led to the satisfaction of both parties by the assignment of Major-General Earl Van Dorn to the command west of the Mississippi River. Van Dorn had been a captain in General Johnston's own regiment, the Second Cavalry, and was distinguished for ant's shortcomings. Halleck was now put in command of the whole West; Buell, Grant, and Pope, on the west bank of the Mississippi, and Curtis in Southwest Missouri, all moving under his supreme control. While the Confederate and Federal armies see he did neither. The truth is, he undervalued his adversary's celerity and daring. The water-shed between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, near the Great Bend, follows the general course of the latter stream, at the distance of some twepeat the grand tactics of Fort Donelson, by separating the rebels in the interior from those at Memphis and on the Mississippi River. We did not fortify our camps against an attack, because we had no orders to do so, and because such a course woul
Mill Spring, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ck pretty accurate information of the numbers there. Grant felt safe at Shiloh, because he knew he was numerically stronger than his adversary. His numbers and his equipment were superior to those of his antagonist, and the discipline and morale of Map. his army ought to have been so. The only infantry of the Confederate army which had ever seen a combat were some of Polk's men, who were at Belmont; Hindman's brigade, which was in the skirmish at Woodsonville; and the fugitives of Mill Spring. In the Federal army were the soldiers who had fought at Belmont, Fort Henry, and Donelson- 30,000 of the last. There were many raw troops on both sides. Some of the Confederates received their arms for the first time that week. Unless these things were so, and unless Grant's army was, in whole or in part, an army of invasion, intended for the offensive, of course it was out of place on that south bank. But Sherman has distinctly asserted that it was in prosecution of an offensive
Cook's Landing (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 FrCook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Furnace18 Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Furnace18
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
trate all your available troops at Savannah, or Pittsburg, twelve miles above. Large reinforcements being sent to General Grant. We must be ready to attack the enemy as soon as the roads are passable. On April 5th Halleck telegraphed from St. Louis: You are right about concentrating at Waynesboro. Future movements must depend on those of the enemy. I shall not be able to leave here until the first of next week, via Fort Henry and Savannah. Buell's letter to Grant, New York World that he was thought to be in danger. On the 3d of April Buell suggested that he had better cross the Tennessee at Hamburg, and Halleck replied, directing him to halt at Waynesboro, thirty miles from Savannah- Saying he could not leave St. Louis until the 7th to join us; but, as his dispatch did not reach me before I arrived at Waynesboro, I made no halt, but continued my march to Savannah. And further yet, the day before his arrival at Savannah, General Nelson, who commanded my leadi
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
Pushing forward through the scrub-oak, his wide-extended line met Sigel's, Asboth's, and Davis's divisions. Here on the rugged spurs of the hills ensued one of those fearful combats in which the most determined valor is resisted by the most stubborn tenacity. In the crisis of the struggle McCulloch, dashing forward to reconnoitre, fell a victim to a lurking sharp-shooter. Almost at the same moment McIntosh, his second in command, fell while charging a Federal battery with a regiment of Texas cavalry. Without direction or head, the shattered lines of the Confederates left the field, to rally, after a wide circuit, on Price's corps. When Van Dorn learned this sad intelligence, he urged his attack, pressing back the Federals until night closed the bloody scene. The Confederate headquarters were then at Elkhorn Tavern, where the Federal headquarters had been in the morning. Each army was now on its opponent's line of communications. Van Dorn found his troops much disorganize
Iuka (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
, April 30, 1862101,051 note.-Owing to the absence of returns of a uniform date, the above figures have been taken from such returns as are on file bearing date nearest to the time desired. Distances. By Land.Miles. From Corinth to Iuka. 23 From Corinth to Burnsville.10 From Corinth to Chewalla11 1/2 From Corinth to Bethel23 From Corinth to Purdy22 From Corinth to Eastport30 From Corinth to Wynn's Landing21 From Corinth to Farmington5 From Corinth to Hamburg19 From Corinth to Monterey11 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Savannah30 Iuka to Eastport8 Burnsville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 Monterey to Purdy15 Monterey to Farmington9 On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ill be to destroy the railroad-bridge over Bear Creek, near Eastport, Mississippi, and also the connections at Corinth, Jackson, and HumboldtSherman with his division, escorted by two gunboats, to land below Eastport and make a break in the Memphis & Charleston Railroad between Tuscumbia and Corinth. Sherman, finding a Confederate battery at Eastport, disembarked below at the mouth of the Yellow River, and started for BuFrom Corinth to Bethel23 From Corinth to Purdy22 From Corinth to Eastport30 From Corinth to Wynn's Landing21 From Corinth to Farmington5 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Savannah30 Iuka to Eastport8 Burnsville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 ing down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landi
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ties by the assignment of Major-General Earl Van Dorn to the command west of the Mississippi River. Van Dorn had been a captain in General Johnston's own regiment, the Second Cavalry, and was distinguished for courage, energy, and decision. On taking command, he adopted bold plans, in accordance with the views of Generals Johnston and Price. But these the enemy did not allow him to carry out. Van Dorn assumed command January 29, 1862, and was engaged in organizing the force in Northeastern Arkansas until February 22d, when, learning the Federal advance, he hastened, with only his staff, to Fayetteville, where McCulloch's army had its headquarters, and toward which Price was falling back from Springfield. General Curtis, the Federal commander, had at Rolla, according to his report, a force of 12,095 men, and fifty pieces of artillery. He advanced February 11th, and Price retreated. He overtook Price's rear-guard at Cassville, and harassed it for four days on the retreat.
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
horn, or Pea Ridge. Beauregard in West Tennessee. evacuation of Columbus. Island no.10. Pope's expedition. Grant's expedition up the Tennessee. plan and movemention of Columbus, and the establishment of a new line resting on New Madrid, Island No.10, and Humboldt. Polk issued the preliminary orders February 25th, for the evcted Brigadier-General J. P. McCown, an old army-officer, for the command of Island No.10, forty miles below Columbus, whither he removed his division February 27th. Pittsburg Landing, important operations were occurring around New Madrid and Island No.10. On the 18th of February General Halleck sent Major-General John Pope, whom hope to hold this position until Fort Pillow was fortified. The defense at Island No.10 was not adequate to the preparations there; but, as its bearing on General Jn of his own army, 25,000 or 30,000 under Beauregard, and 9,000 or 10,000 at Island No.10, Fort Pillow, and other garrisons; not more than 60,000 in all, of whom not
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