hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. S. Johnston 1,542 0 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 865 67 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 578 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 515 3 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 458 0 Browse Search
William Preston Johnston 445 3 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 436 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 404 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 347 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 341 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

Found 910 total hits in 168 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Chewalla (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
)9,600 Total49,617 General Grant's command, February 1, 186227,113 General Buell's command, February 20, 1862103,864 General Grant's command, April 1, 186268,175 General Buell's command, April 30, 1862101,051 note.-Owing to the absence of returns of a uniform date, the above figures have been taken from such returns as are on file bearing date nearest to the time desired. Distances. By Land.Miles. From Corinth to Iuka. 23 From Corinth to Burnsville.10 From Corinth to Chewalla11 1/2 From Corinth to Bethel23 From Corinth to Purdy22 From Corinth to Eastport30 From Corinth to Wynn's Landing21 From Corinth to Farmington5 From Corinth to Hamburg19 From Corinth to Monterey11 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Savannah30 Iuka to Eastport8 Burnsville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 Monterey to Purdy15 Monterey to Farmington9 On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 Fro
Snake Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
, as they approach the river, become deep, or spread out in tangled marshes. The ridges between these creeks are considerably elevated above the river-level. The Tennessee flows northwest for some distance, until a little west of Hamburg, a point nineteen miles from Corinth, it takes its final bend to the north. Here, two affluents, Owl and Lick Creeks, flowing nearly parallel, somewhat north of east, from three to five miles apart, empty into the Tennessee. Owl Creek, uniting with Snake Creek, takes that name below their junction. It forms the northern limit of the ridge, which Lick Creek bounds on the south. These streams, rising some ten or twelve miles back, toward Corinth, were bordered near their mouths by swamps filled with back-water, and impassable except where the roads crossed. The inclosed space, a rude parallelogram, is a rolling table-land, about one hundred feet above the river-level, with its water-shed lying near Lick Creek, and either slope broken by de
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
in Kentucky, like wary swordsmen, watched every opposing movement, with only an occasional thrust and parry, until the final rush and death-grapple, the struggle in Missouri resembled those stage-combats in which many and often aimless blows are given, the antagonists exchange weapons and positions, and the situations shift with startling rapidity, until an interposing hand strikes up the weapons and leaves the contest undecided. After the return of Price's army from the expedition to Lexington, it moved about in Southwestern Missouri until Christmas, when it advanced to Springfield, where it remained until the middle of February. McCulloch wrote to General Johnston, October 11th, that he had been able to recruit about 1,000 infantry, which did not supply his losses from sickness. McCulloch was convinced that nothing could be done until spring, except in the way of organization and preparation. Many motives impelled Price to resume the aggressive. He was flattered with the ge
Bentonville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ear-guard at Cassville, and harassed it for four days on the retreat. Curtis pursued Price to Fayetteville, Arkansas, and then retired to Sugar Creek, where he proposed to establish himself. Leaving the main body here to fortify, he sent out heavy detachments to live upon the country and collect provisions. As soon as Van Dorn arrived at the Confederate camps, on Boston Mountain, he made speedy preparations to attack Curtis or some one of his detachments. Learning that Sigel was at Bentonville with 7,000 men, he attempted to intercept him with his army, then about 16,000 strong. The lack of discipline and perfect methods in the Confederate army allowed Sigel to effect his escape, which he did with considerable skill. Curtis was enabled to concentrate at Sugar Creek; and, instead of taking him in detail, Van Dorn was obliged to assail his entire army. Nevertheless, while Curtis was preparing for a front attack, Van Dorn, by a wide detour, led Price's army to the Federal re
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
Distances. By Land.Miles. From Corinth to Iuka. 23 From Corinth to Burnsville.10 From Corinth to Chewalla11 1/2 From Corinth to Bethel23 From Corinth to Purdy22 From Corinth to Eastport30 From Corinth to Wynn's Landing21 From Corinth to Farmington5 From Corinth to Hamburg19 From Corinth to Monterey11 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Savannah30 Iuka to Eastport8 Burnsville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 Monterey to Purdy15 Monterey to Farmington9 On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to InPurdy15 Monterey to Farmington9 On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsbu
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 35
least ten thousand ran away, held their ground against sixty thousand chosen troops of the South, with their best leaders. In a letter to the editor of the United States service Magazine, published January, 1865, General Sherman says: It was General Smith who selected that field of battle, and it was well chosen. On any other s order either an evidence of weakness, or an invitation to attack, or as calculated to make his raw men timid. Sherman, in his letter to the editor of the United States Service Magazine, already quoted, which might by courtesy be styled his After-thoughts, wrote as follows: It was necessary that a combat, fierce and bittto Grant, New York World, April 6, 1866. General Buell gives the following summary of his share in the campaign before Shiloh, in a letter published in the United States Service Magazine, to the statements of which his high character must secure entire credit: I deemed it best that mine [my army] should march through by l
Union City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
No.10, and Humboldt. Polk issued the preliminary orders February 25th, for the evacuation, which was completed on March 2d. General Beauregard selected Brigadier-General J. P. McCown, an old army-officer, for the command of Island No.10, forty miles below Columbus, whither he removed his division February 27th. A. P. Stewart's brigade was also sent to New Madrid. Some 7,500 troops were assembled at these points. The remainder of the forces marched by land, under General Cheatham, to Union City. The quarters and buildings were committed to the flames; and at 3 P. Ir., March 2d, General Polk followed the retiring column from the abandoned stronghold. Polk says in his report: The enemy's cavalry — the first of his forces to arrive after the evacuation-reached Columbus in the afternoon next day, twenty-four hours after the last of our troops had left. In five days we moved the accumulations of six months, taking with us all our commissary and quartermaster's stores — an
Leetown (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
n, and fifty pieces of artillery. He advanced February 11th, and Price retreated. He overtook Price's rear-guard at Cassville, and harassed it for four days on the retreat. Curtis pursued Price to Fayetteville, Arkansas, and then retired to Sugar Creek, where he proposed to establish himself. Leaving the main body here to fortify, he sent out heavy detachments to live upon the country and collect provisions. As soon as Van Dorn arrived at the Confederate camps, on Boston Mountain, he mampted to intercept him with his army, then about 16,000 strong. The lack of discipline and perfect methods in the Confederate army allowed Sigel to effect his escape, which he did with considerable skill. Curtis was enabled to concentrate at Sugar Creek; and, instead of taking him in detail, Van Dorn was obliged to assail his entire army. Nevertheless, while Curtis was preparing for a front attack, Van Dorn, by a wide detour, led Price's army to the Federal rear, moving McCulloch against
Lick Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
takes its final bend to the north. Here, two affluents, Owl and Lick Creeks, flowing nearly parallel, somewhat north of east, from three to their junction. It forms the northern limit of the ridge, which Lick Creek bounds on the south. These streams, rising some ten or twelve mindred feet above the river-level, with its water-shed lying near Lick Creek, and either slope broken by deep and frequent ravines draining into the two creeks; the side toward Lick Creek being precipitous, while that toward Owl Creek, though broken, is a gradual declivity. This pla-cabins, was situated about midway between the mouths of Owl and Lick Creeks, in the narrow and swampy bottom that here fringes the Tennesseebers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's LandinLick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Fur
Woodsonville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
y when Buell was conveying to Halleck pretty accurate information of the numbers there. Grant felt safe at Shiloh, because he knew he was numerically stronger than his adversary. His numbers and his equipment were superior to those of his antagonist, and the discipline and morale of Map. his army ought to have been so. The only infantry of the Confederate army which had ever seen a combat were some of Polk's men, who were at Belmont; Hindman's brigade, which was in the skirmish at Woodsonville; and the fugitives of Mill Spring. In the Federal army were the soldiers who had fought at Belmont, Fort Henry, and Donelson- 30,000 of the last. There were many raw troops on both sides. Some of the Confederates received their arms for the first time that week. Unless these things were so, and unless Grant's army was, in whole or in part, an army of invasion, intended for the offensive, of course it was out of place on that south bank. But Sherman has distinctly asserted that it
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...